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New B&M 100lux headlight.



 
 
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  #91  
Old Today, 02:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,641
Default New B&M 100lux headlight.

On Mon, 11 Dec 2017 09:53:50 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 12/10/2017 8:01 PM, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 10 Dec 2017 12:30:16 +0100, Sepp Ruf
wrote:

John B. wrote:
On Sat, 09 Dec 2017 19:41:16 -0600, Tim McNamara wrote:
On Sat, 9 Dec 2017 10:34:13 +0100, Sepp Ruf wrote:
Because you generally want to shield from a flattish \ line of
approaching lights, but not shield your view to the sides, the flatter
brims work better.

We're talking about cycling caps, not baseball caps. A cycling cap
bill's curve would shade the center of the field of view while allowing
peripheral vision.

True. Just use what works best for you, short of Yehuda Moon style. Our
beloved champions aren't strict either, at least after a bad (styrofoam)
hair day:
https://ekz-crosstour.ch/wp/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/RSP_1321-1024x682.jpg

Just like the curved cutoff in the awful OculuStvzo engineering sample
doesn't work...

There's no equivalence between the shape of the brim and the shape of
the cutoff. The cutoff is designed to manage outgoing light, keeping it
where it is useful and not shining it where it is not.

Not functionally equivalent, of course. You did see the video he linked?
There are only two choices with a reversed crescent cutoff: Either aim it
low enough that it does not glare directly opposing traffic, or aim it high
enough to keep the 90 and 270 degree fields of vision for fast curves.

black-tinted rear window; auto-dimming mirrors; manure-spreading trailer.

I have an auto-dimming mirror in my new car. It verges on useless as it
does not dim anywhere near enough. I'd rather have a manual mirror so
that I don't have to reach up and point the damned mirror at the ceiling
so that I'm not blinded by the vehicle behind me.

My wife's small Honda has a manual tab on the bottom of the mirror.
Flick it with your finger and the "guy behind"'s lights are focused on
the ceiling :-)

Still leaves the side mirrors vulnerable. Okay, so the trailer will need to
be wide enough to block the view, but not as wide as to require the mounting
of extra side mirrors on the Honda.


I'm not sure about side mirrors. I have them on my pickup and my
wife's little Honda has them But I don't remember ever having a
problem with them.


I sometimes have the problem, mostly on freeways. My wife even has that
problem sitting in the passenger seat. It occurs mostly when truck
drivers (pickups, box trucks, tractor-trailer rigs) have high headlights
and insist on using high beams. It's more MFFY behavior.

Our current car has electrically adjustable side mirrors. If speed
differentials are small enough that the problem persists for more than a
few seconds, I point the mirrors downward until the offender is out of
range. If they pass quickly, I just shade my side mirror with my hand.


It might be the way I have the side mirrors aimed on the pickup. With
my head in the normal driving position I can see that rear edge of the
cargo box on the inside edge of the mirrors, and the rest is road.

My wife possibly re-aims the side mirrors if they bother her. At least
I've seen her adjust them when she starts the car.

Hey! After the saga about building small wheels and the spokes that
didn't tighten, you never did divulge your secrets of how to built
small wheels with long spokes :-)

--
Cheers,

John B.

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  #92  
Old Today, 02:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,468
Default wheel building problems

On 12/11/2017 8:23 PM, John B. wrote:


Hey! After the saga about building small wheels and the spokes that
didn't tighten, you never did divulge your secrets of how to built
small wheels with long spokes :-)


It was a very frustrating process. One of my best friends used to own a
bike shop. (BTW, I have other friends who used to own bike shops.
Apparently it's a tough way to make a living.) Anyway, he has a Hozan
spoke threader. Its dies roll the threads onto spokes.

So I borrowed it. (It's still in my basement.) Using extra spokes I had,
I experimenting with extending spoke threads a few millimeters, which I
figured was all I needed. But I failed again and again, probably many
more than 20 tries. I played endlessly with the depth adjustment of the
threads. I tried cutting spokes short and starting on the unthreaded
portion of the spokes. What I found time after time was a nipple would
thread on only about 6 to 8 mm, then bind. I tried several types of
nipples, and starting from either end of the nipples. No dice.

Looking with super-close-up goggles, then with a small microscope, it
seemed that the thread form was not symmetrical, not truly perpendicular
to the axis of the spoke. The threads sort of leaned one way, so to
speak - but I don't really know if that was the problem. My friend lent
me another head for the tool but it did no better. I did trials cranking
the thread roller by hand, and many more using an electric drill to do
the trials more rapidly. I lubricated using ordinary oil, then cutting
fluid. Nothing worked.

So I gave up on the proper solution, and went with a kludge. I
counterbored the original nipples about 2 mm, and also slid thin washers
onto the nipples for a belt and suspenders approach. The wheel tensioned
up fine, straight and true. Since the spoke ends are essentially even
with the "top" surface of the nipple, the original error was probably no
more than a millimeter, whatever caused it. I still suspect a slightly
undersized rim.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #93  
Old Today, 08:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,641
Default wheel building problems

On Mon, 11 Dec 2017 20:55:55 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 12/11/2017 8:23 PM, John B. wrote:


Hey! After the saga about building small wheels and the spokes that
didn't tighten, you never did divulge your secrets of how to built
small wheels with long spokes :-)


It was a very frustrating process. One of my best friends used to own a
bike shop. (BTW, I have other friends who used to own bike shops.
Apparently it's a tough way to make a living.) Anyway, he has a Hozan
spoke threader. Its dies roll the threads onto spokes.

So I borrowed it. (It's still in my basement.) Using extra spokes I had,
I experimenting with extending spoke threads a few millimeters, which I
figured was all I needed. But I failed again and again, probably many
more than 20 tries. I played endlessly with the depth adjustment of the
threads. I tried cutting spokes short and starting on the unthreaded
portion of the spokes. What I found time after time was a nipple would
thread on only about 6 to 8 mm, then bind. I tried several types of
nipples, and starting from either end of the nipples. No dice.

Looking with super-close-up goggles, then with a small microscope, it
seemed that the thread form was not symmetrical, not truly perpendicular
to the axis of the spoke. The threads sort of leaned one way, so to
speak - but I don't really know if that was the problem. My friend lent
me another head for the tool but it did no better. I did trials cranking
the thread roller by hand, and many more using an electric drill to do
the trials more rapidly. I lubricated using ordinary oil, then cutting
fluid. Nothing worked.

So I gave up on the proper solution, and went with a kludge. I
counterbored the original nipples about 2 mm, and also slid thin washers
onto the nipples for a belt and suspenders approach. The wheel tensioned
up fine, straight and true. Since the spoke ends are essentially even
with the "top" surface of the nipple, the original error was probably no
more than a millimeter, whatever caused it. I still suspect a slightly
undersized rim.


I had never seen a Hozan threader although looking on the net it seems
pretty common device. I did some looking on Amazon came across the
cutting head listed separately.
https://tinyurl.com/y8r7sars

Looking at the enlarged view it doesn't look like a very precise
device. Note the angle of the bottom roller versus the angle (as well
as you can see) of the other two.

I had some spokes cut and re-threaded in Singapore a couple of years
ago and I think that "those guys" used a machine that they got from
one of the spoke companies.
--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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