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  #1  
Old August 11th 19, 07:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 964
Default Power

I have some information on power development he

http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/cyclingpoweroutput.aspx

Using this information it appears that I'm making over 200 watts on a good day.

I did 22 miles on Thursday with one long 6% climb and four over 5% humps in an hour and 25 minutes. After a short break I continued into a 25 knot wind right on the nose for another 6 miles and then a hard climb up to 1,000 feet with up to 11% recorded max grade (though these three hard grades measure 12% as often as hot.)

I got home with 42 miles and a riding time of 3 hrs and 22 minutes and a total of 2,404 feet of climbing for an average speed of 12.2 mph.

I was wondering if my average speed was including my breaks so I installed MapMyRide and checked my average speed that way. I got pretty near the same average speed. This leaves me wondering how the hell that people tell me that they do a flat ride that crosses about 20 stop lights and get an average speed of 17 mph.
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  #2  
Old August 11th 19, 11:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Posts: 6,010
Default Power

On 12/8/19 4:09 am, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have some information on power development he

http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/cyclingpoweroutput.aspx

Using this information it appears that I'm making over 200 watts on a
good day.

I did 22 miles on Thursday with one long 6% climb and four over 5%
humps in an hour and 25 minutes. After a short break I continued into
a 25 knot wind right on the nose for another 6 miles and then a hard
climb up to 1,000 feet with up to 11% recorded max grade (though
these three hard grades measure 12% as often as hot.)

I got home with 42 miles and a riding time of 3 hrs and 22 minutes
and a total of 2,404 feet of climbing for an average speed of 12.2
mph.

I was wondering if my average speed was including my breaks so I
installed MapMyRide and checked my average speed that way. I got
pretty near the same average speed. This leaves me wondering how the
hell that people tell me that they do a flat ride that crosses about
20 stop lights and get an average speed of 17 mph.


Are you questioning whether people use a device that stops the clock
when they stop at lights or not?

I used to ride through city streets and on a typical 60 km ride would
stop more than 20 times, and my average speed was often around 32km/h
(20mph). My cycle computer stops the clock when I stop the bike.

--
JS
  #3  
Old August 13th 19, 12:06 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 964
Default Power

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 3:00:58 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 12/8/19 4:09 am, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have some information on power development he

http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/cyclingpoweroutput.aspx

Using this information it appears that I'm making over 200 watts on a
good day.

I did 22 miles on Thursday with one long 6% climb and four over 5%
humps in an hour and 25 minutes. After a short break I continued into
a 25 knot wind right on the nose for another 6 miles and then a hard
climb up to 1,000 feet with up to 11% recorded max grade (though
these three hard grades measure 12% as often as hot.)

I got home with 42 miles and a riding time of 3 hrs and 22 minutes
and a total of 2,404 feet of climbing for an average speed of 12.2
mph.

I was wondering if my average speed was including my breaks so I
installed MapMyRide and checked my average speed that way. I got
pretty near the same average speed. This leaves me wondering how the
hell that people tell me that they do a flat ride that crosses about
20 stop lights and get an average speed of 17 mph.


Are you questioning whether people use a device that stops the clock
when they stop at lights or not?

I used to ride through city streets and on a typical 60 km ride would
stop more than 20 times, and my average speed was often around 32km/h
(20mph). My cycle computer stops the clock when I stop the bike.

--
JS


Well using MapMyRide it appears to give me the same average speed as my cycling computers (several different brands). So how is it that I'm seeing averages of 12-14 mph and they all talk about 17 and 18 mph averages? Uphill they are generally faster until the last couple of rides. On the flats we are about the same speed. And downhill I'm so far gone that I have to wait 5 minutes at the top of the little HARD rise on the last hill into the city. 200 ft in a quarter mile. Not quite as hard as the top of Mt. Diablo but the steep part is twice as far.
  #4  
Old August 16th 19, 10:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
incredulous
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Posts: 107
Default Power

A Garmin watch offers auto-pause as an option. Calculation of rates and ratios will vary with use of the option.

Is auto-detection of pauses accurate? I doubt it as true as detection built into wheel rotation or disconnecting the speedometer.

Harry Travis
Portland Oregon USA
  #5  
Old August 17th 19, 12:07 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 4,247
Default Power

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 3:00:58 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 12/8/19 4:09 am, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have some information on power development he

http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/cyclingpoweroutput.aspx

Using this information it appears that I'm making over 200 watts on a
good day.

I did 22 miles on Thursday with one long 6% climb and four over 5%
humps in an hour and 25 minutes. After a short break I continued into
a 25 knot wind right on the nose for another 6 miles and then a hard
climb up to 1,000 feet with up to 11% recorded max grade (though
these three hard grades measure 12% as often as hot.)

I got home with 42 miles and a riding time of 3 hrs and 22 minutes
and a total of 2,404 feet of climbing for an average speed of 12.2
mph.

I was wondering if my average speed was including my breaks so I
installed MapMyRide and checked my average speed that way. I got
pretty near the same average speed. This leaves me wondering how the
hell that people tell me that they do a flat ride that crosses about
20 stop lights and get an average speed of 17 mph.


Are you questioning whether people use a device that stops the clock
when they stop at lights or not?

I used to ride through city streets and on a typical 60 km ride would
stop more than 20 times, and my average speed was often around 32km/h
(20mph). My cycle computer stops the clock when I stop the bike.


The bummer is when you don't stop but have to slow way down for lights or stops -- then you get dinged and look like a loser on Strava.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #6  
Old August 17th 19, 02:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 28
Default Power

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 2:09:28 PM UTC-4, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have some information on power development he

http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/cyclingpoweroutput.aspx

Using this information it appears that I'm making over 200 watts on a good day.

I did 22 miles on Thursday with one long 6% climb and four over 5% humps in an hour and 25 minutes. After a short break I continued into a 25 knot wind right on the nose for another 6 miles and then a hard climb up to 1,000 feet with up to 11% recorded max grade (though these three hard grades measure 12% as often as hot.)

I got home with 42 miles and a riding time of 3 hrs and 22 minutes and a total of 2,404 feet of climbing for an average speed of 12.2 mph.

I was wondering if my average speed was including my breaks so I installed MapMyRide and checked my average speed that way. I got pretty near the same average speed. This leaves me wondering how the hell that people tell me that they do a flat ride that crosses about 20 stop lights and get an average speed of 17 mph.


The other responders are correct, it's the auto-pause function, and they aren't the same from device to device. It's likely both your computer and the Map My Ride app do not have the auto-pause turned on, hence the similar averages. I have an old Polar 720 strapped to my commuter, but always use strava on my phone as well. The polar autopause is quite quick - it stops accumulating within about two seconds of the stop, and one second upon restart. The strava app takes quite a bit longer to stop. As a result: The actual moving time between the two devices on my 20 mile commute can vary by as much as three minutes (I go through 16 stop lights), but the total time is well over 5 minutes, sometimes as high as ten depending on how gracious the traffic light gods are feeling that day.

NOTE: Another annoying "feature" of GPS tracking devices is that they can shorten the actual travel distance depending on the sampling rate of the device - in essence, the function sometimes doesn't take enough data points which results in the traveled distance being quite a bit shorter. I had an early Garmin device that had a fixed five-second sampling rate, which really sucked on technical single track.
  #7  
Old August 17th 19, 02:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 477
Default Power

On Saturday, August 17, 2019 at 1:07:37 AM UTC+2, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 3:00:58 PM UTC-7, James wrote:
On 12/8/19 4:09 am, Tom Kunich wrote:
I have some information on power development he

http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/cyclingpoweroutput.aspx

Using this information it appears that I'm making over 200 watts on a
good day.

I did 22 miles on Thursday with one long 6% climb and four over 5%
humps in an hour and 25 minutes. After a short break I continued into
a 25 knot wind right on the nose for another 6 miles and then a hard
climb up to 1,000 feet with up to 11% recorded max grade (though
these three hard grades measure 12% as often as hot.)

I got home with 42 miles and a riding time of 3 hrs and 22 minutes
and a total of 2,404 feet of climbing for an average speed of 12.2
mph.

I was wondering if my average speed was including my breaks so I
installed MapMyRide and checked my average speed that way. I got
pretty near the same average speed. This leaves me wondering how the
hell that people tell me that they do a flat ride that crosses about
20 stop lights and get an average speed of 17 mph.


Are you questioning whether people use a device that stops the clock
when they stop at lights or not?

I used to ride through city streets and on a typical 60 km ride would
stop more than 20 times, and my average speed was often around 32km/h
(20mph). My cycle computer stops the clock when I stop the bike.


The bummer is when you don't stop but have to slow way down for lights or stops -- then you get dinged and look like a loser on Strava.

-- Jay Beattie.


On my Garmin I can set the auto stop speed. You can set it to 35 km/hr. I would get ultra short rides with an incredible average speed ;-). I have set it to 5 km/hr so the ferry which I take quite ofter doesn't start the timer. I don't know how Strava handles this but the lap that include the ferry has always an ridiculous low average speed. I want my money back ;-)

Lou
  #8  
Old August 17th 19, 08:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 964
Default Power

On Friday, August 16, 2019 at 2:53:32 PM UTC-7, incredulous wrote:
A Garmin watch offers auto-pause as an option. Calculation of rates and ratios will vary with use of the option.

Is auto-detection of pauses accurate? I doubt it as true as detection built into wheel rotation or disconnecting the speedometer.

Harry Travis
Portland Oregon USA


I think that the auto-pause doesn't kick in for as much as 10 minutes. That sounds like a long time but comparing distance on a smartphone app and the speedo gives the same average speed and distance.
 




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