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Recovery and Diet



 
 
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  #11  
Old August 12th 19, 09:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 4,107
Default Recovery and Diet

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 1:03:36 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 9:22:53 AM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
Cross Crusade -- this is just the beginner woman's field. https://tinyurl..com/y36z88ug I kid you not.

-- Jay Beattie.


I don't mean to sound snarky or rude, but that picture has a whole lot of men in it. And Santa Claus is down at the bottom of the picture talking to a little girl. Who definitely does NOT qualify as a woman. But maybe Oregon has a very different definition of "beginner woman's field".


Wrong link! https://www.cxmagazine.com/wp-conten...men-cc-pdx.jpg That's women. This is the beginner women: https://www.cxmagazine.com/wp-conten...-cc-women3.jpg That picture is from Alpenrose, my neighborhood dairy and velodrome: https://cni.pmgnews.com/images/artim...3582137737.jpg

-- Jay Beattie.
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  #12  
Old August 12th 19, 10:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 7,489
Default Recovery and Diet

On 8/12/2019 3:43 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 8:41:28 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.

Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou


I have the idea that you don't climb Lou. You absolutely must generate a lot of power to climb and the 12 or more percentage grades can take power in the 400 to 600 category just to crest.


Well I certainly don't climb as much as I would like but I have my moments and I have those moments for 30 years now:

https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3820852059

That aside grade has little to do with power. You only need the proper gearing. I can haul 85 kg 850 meter up in an hour. The average power needed for that is (mass*gravitational acceleration*elevation gain)/time in sec = (85*9.81*850)/3600 Nm/sec (= Watt) = 197 Watt. I can use the same available power to go fast against a headwind. There is nothing special about climbing when we talk about power needed. Accelerating after a corner or sprinting over a highway overpass you can easily exceed 600 Watt, but only for a short time. 400 Watt average over a distance of 16 km is a hard to believe value. Try a proper power meter and look at the data during a ride.


For discussing cheap and overrated Chinese headlights, the term
"chilumens" has become useful. You know - lumens that are somehow far
less powerful than standard ones.

Perhaps some people measure rider power output in KuniWatts? :-)


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #13  
Old August 12th 19, 11:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 624
Default Recovery and Diet

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 12:43:05 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 8:41:28 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.

Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou


I have the idea that you don't climb Lou. You absolutely must generate a lot of power to climb and the 12 or more percentage grades can take power in the 400 to 600 category just to crest.


Well I certainly don't climb as much as I would like but I have my moments and I have those moments for 30 years now:

https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3820852059

That aside grade has little to do with power. You only need the proper gearing. I can haul 85 kg 850 meter up in an hour. The average power needed for that is (mass*gravitational acceleration*elevation gain)/time in sec = (85*9.81*850)/3600 Nm/sec (= Watt) = 197 Watt. I can use the same available power to go fast against a headwind. There is nothing special about climbing when we talk about power needed. Accelerating after a corner or sprinting over a highway overpass you can easily exceed 600 Watt, but only for a short time. 400 Watt average over a distance of 16 km is a hard to believe value. Try a proper power meter and look at the data during a ride.

Lou


Normally a Cat 3 rider exits turns and generates 1000 to 1200 watts for the couple of seconds to get back up to speed where they hold about 600 before letting off for the next turn. There are several video's on YouTube that have the power overlay on the screen with the race. In the last sprint 1,600 watts was shown.

Until a couple of years ago the fast guys would be climbing an 8% grade at 8 mph and from 1/4 mile back I would shut them down and enter the rest area with them. Sometimes dropping them. And I'm a poor climber at 6'4" and 185 lbs.
Though I could do the same thing when I was 210 and in my 50's.

A year ago I tried the same thing and I came into the rest area slightly behind them. I turned around and was looking relaxed by the time they turned around and saw me. But that was all show since my heart rate must have been at 200.

I'm taking this stuff that is supposed to naturally boost your EPO. I can't tell if it is working a little or I'm getting more rest.
  #14  
Old August 12th 19, 11:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 624
Default Recovery and Diet

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 1:04:22 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 12:43:05 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 8:41:28 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.

Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou

I have the idea that you don't climb Lou. You absolutely must generate a lot of power to climb and the 12 or more percentage grades can take power in the 400 to 600 category just to crest.


Well I certainly don't climb as much as I would like but I have my moments and I have those moments for 30 years now:

https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3820852059

That aside grade has little to do with power. You only need the proper gearing. I can haul 85 kg 850 meter up in an hour. The average power needed for that is (mass*gravitational acceleration*elevation gain)/time in sec = (85*9.81*850)/3600 Nm/sec (= Watt) = 197 Watt. I can use the same available power to go fast against a headwind. There is nothing special about climbing when we talk about power needed. Accelerating after a corner or sprinting over a highway overpass you can easily exceed 600 Watt, but only for a short time. 400 Watt average over a distance of 16 km is a hard to believe value. Try a proper power meter and look at the data during a ride.



Stages. Its the best. https://stagescycling.com/us/products/power/

-- Jay Beattie.


Just out of curiosity what do you need that for? My brother has one and while he has high average speeds the power output doesn't seem particularly impressive. Racers use it in a race so that they don't go too hard too early - are you racing?
  #15  
Old August 12th 19, 11:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 624
Default Recovery and Diet

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 2:06:51 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/12/2019 3:43 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 8:41:28 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.

Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou

I have the idea that you don't climb Lou. You absolutely must generate a lot of power to climb and the 12 or more percentage grades can take power in the 400 to 600 category just to crest.


Well I certainly don't climb as much as I would like but I have my moments and I have those moments for 30 years now:

https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3820852059

That aside grade has little to do with power. You only need the proper gearing. I can haul 85 kg 850 meter up in an hour. The average power needed for that is (mass*gravitational acceleration*elevation gain)/time in sec = (85*9.81*850)/3600 Nm/sec (= Watt) = 197 Watt. I can use the same available power to go fast against a headwind. There is nothing special about climbing when we talk about power needed. Accelerating after a corner or sprinting over a highway overpass you can easily exceed 600 Watt, but only for a short time. 400 Watt average over a distance of 16 km is a hard to believe value. Try a proper power meter and look at the data during a ride.


For discussing cheap and overrated Chinese headlights, the term
"chilumens" has become useful. You know - lumens that are somehow far
less powerful than standard ones.

Perhaps some people measure rider power output in KuniWatts? :-)


--
- Frank Krygowski


And perhaps some people don't mind being poo-poo heads as a career. Since you can't even ride 15 miles now perhaps you're not the one to be speaking of power.
  #16  
Old August 12th 19, 11:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
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Posts: 624
Default Recovery and Diet

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.


Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.


There is a ketone diet which restricts your intake of carbohydrates and "teaches" your body to use fat instead of the much more limited carbohydrates. This is composed of a diet deficient in carbohydrates.

And there is the actual using of Ketones as a diet itself when racing. This later is what the pro-peloton his having a bit of problems with.
While it does give them upset stomachs (read diarrhea) and a taste that would make a spider gag, it still produces 1 to 2% faster recovery from efforts.
  #17  
Old August 12th 19, 11:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
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Posts: 763
Default Recovery and Diet

On Mon, 12 Aug 2019 15:07:08 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 2:06:51 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/12/2019 3:43 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 8:41:28 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.

Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou

I have the idea that you don't climb Lou. You absolutely must generate a lot of power to climb and the 12 or more percentage grades can take power in the 400 to 600 category just to crest.

Well I certainly don't climb as much as I would like but I have my moments and I have those moments for 30 years now:

https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3820852059

That aside grade has little to do with power. You only need the proper gearing. I can haul 85 kg 850 meter up in an hour. The average power needed for that is (mass*gravitational acceleration*elevation gain)/time in sec = (85*9.81*850)/3600 Nm/sec (= Watt) = 197 Watt. I can use the same available power to go fast against a headwind. There is nothing special about climbing when we talk about power needed. Accelerating after a corner or sprinting over a highway overpass you can easily exceed 600 Watt, but only for a short time. 400 Watt average over a distance of 16 km is a hard to believe value. Try a proper power meter and look at the data during a ride.


For discussing cheap and overrated Chinese headlights, the term
"chilumens" has become useful. You know - lumens that are somehow far
less powerful than standard ones.

Perhaps some people measure rider power output in KuniWatts? :-)


--
- Frank Krygowski


And perhaps some people don't mind being poo-poo heads as a career. Since you can't even ride 15 miles now perhaps you're not the one to be speaking of power.


Can't even ride 15 miles....

But think of the poor 70 year old geezer, bald headed and bragging,
about how he averaged 12 mph. For two whole hours, even!

Now, that IS pitiful!
--
cheers,

John B.

  #18  
Old August 12th 19, 11:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 624
Default Recovery and Diet

On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates.

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.


Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou


That is faster than hell.

Four years ago with a good tailwind I did 5 miles (8 Km) a little faster than that average and I had to come to a complete stop every 1/2 mile and wait for a stop light to change. Then accelerate up to top speed again trying to get to the next light before it turned red so that I would catch the synchronization. I never made it and I came in a couple of minutes after the group I was with who were on the other side of the lights and never had to stop. Though when I pulled into the parking lot of the Century I was so far gone I couldn't find the car because there was a police car pulled in front of the driveway into that particular parking lot and I didn't even realize it.

I wondered around for five minutes before wandering back and the cop car being gone found the parking lot with the entire group waiting for me. And then having to hear about how slow I was.
  #19  
Old August 13th 19, 12:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,107
Default Recovery and Diet

On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 3:05:11 PM UTC-7, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 1:04:22 PM UTC-7, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 12:43:05 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Monday, August 12, 2019 at 8:41:28 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 1:46:55 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Sunday, August 11, 2019 at 10:00:57 PM UTC+2, Tom Kunich wrote:
Personal experience and Global Cycling News programming often disagree as they have speaking about Ketone diets.

As it turns out, a weight loss diet and their idea of a Ketone dirt are more or less the same thing. Protein and Fats and no carbohydrates..

Since my wife has been trying to lose weight (and has been successful) I've ended up eating GCN's sort of Ketone Diet.

It hasn't have any positive effect on my performance and I can tell you that. Yet when I stop on a ride and have a coffee and a sugar roll, I get not only a boost in performance but I feel a lot better after the ride without the need to fall asleep in the lounge chair before I can even put the bike away.

Now what this is telling me is that if you are on the Ketone Diet your (or perhaps only my) liver simply cannot metabolize fat fast enough to maintain a performance level, but the speed with which I can metabolize carbohydrates is enough to hold my performance levels (which, granted are only around 200 Watts on a good day) for my normal rides of around 40-60 miles with a lot of climbing.

Now if we are talking a scant 10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance a couple of times this year.

Even in the Pro peloton the effect of ketons is questioned. Best and cheapest recovery drink is 0.5 liter of low fat choco drink: 2 third carbs and 1 third protein.

Again Tom 400 W is Pro level, even for 10 k miles. I set a new personal record yesterday for a Strava segment here in my neighborhood. Flat, no stop signs, almost no traffic and a moderate tailwind: 5.53 km in 7min 23 sec; average speed 45 km/hr. Average power of 259 Watt, measured with a power meter. Average heartbeat of 167 bpm. Overall place 44 out of 4070. First place out of 207 in this years classification in my age category: 55-64 yr. I am 62 y old. So I'm above average and nowhere near 400 W for a shorter distance. Again 400 Watt is Pro level.

Lou

I have the idea that you don't climb Lou. You absolutely must generate a lot of power to climb and the 12 or more percentage grades can take power in the 400 to 600 category just to crest.

Well I certainly don't climb as much as I would like but I have my moments and I have those moments for 30 years now:

https://connect.garmin.com/modern/activity/3820852059

That aside grade has little to do with power. You only need the proper gearing. I can haul 85 kg 850 meter up in an hour. The average power needed for that is (mass*gravitational acceleration*elevation gain)/time in sec = (85*9.81*850)/3600 Nm/sec (= Watt) = 197 Watt. I can use the same available power to go fast against a headwind. There is nothing special about climbing when we talk about power needed. Accelerating after a corner or sprinting over a highway overpass you can easily exceed 600 Watt, but only for a short time. 400 Watt average over a distance of 16 km is a hard to believe value. Try a proper power meter and look at the data during a ride.



Stages. Its the best. https://stagescycling.com/us/products/power/

-- Jay Beattie.


Just out of curiosity what do you need that for? My brother has one and while he has high average speeds the power output doesn't seem particularly impressive. Racers use it in a race so that they don't go too hard too early - are you racing?


No, I'm trying to support my son's employer. Training with power is SOP for racers and sport riders these days. I'm not into data, because its mostly depressing, but some people love it -- like most of my friends. And god bless them for supporting Stages. If it's good enough for Sky/Ineos, its good enough for you! https://www.teamineos.com/sponsors/stages Offices in Portland Ory-gun. You need one because you quote all these whacky power figures calculated from god-knows-what. Get a real power meter with your savvy investment earnings.

-- Jay Beattie.







  #20  
Old August 13th 19, 01:35 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Claus A▀mann
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Posts: 17
Default Recovery and Diet

Tom Kunich wrote:

10K I have generated as much as 400 watts over that distance


So you can _average_ 400 W for 16 kilometers ("10K") (i.e., for
about 25 minutes)?
How did you measure that power output?

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