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Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 5th 19, 04:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,668
Default Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths

On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:02:21 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/3/2019 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-03 14:41, Steve Weeks wrote:
Here in Chicago, the bike lanes are rarely kept plowed, which puts me
in the narrower-by-the-width-of 2-bike-lanes traffic lane. On
narrower streets, this is a real problem. Even on wider streets where
there are no bollards or any other physical obstacles between the
traffic lane and the bike lane, the bike lane is usually not plowed.
Sort of un-clear on the concept.


One solution but I'd get studded tires:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIpqfIXzKkQ


My impression of the video is that the snow being plowed has very low
moisture content, i.e. it doesn't weigh much. It's also "virgin"
un-walked-upon snow. When I lived in Colorado, I shoveled some of that;
could have cleared it with a push broom - or probably a leaf blower. We
get much heavier stuff in Western Oregon.

What Jay said about refrozen, walked-upon (especially high moisture
content) snow is on the money; it's hard to describe riding on that
stuff, except that mostly you can't (or at least I can't), and that's
with studded mountain tires. I refer to it as "craters of the moon", if
the craters were around 2-3" in diameter with tall, hard sides. If the
craters (footprints) are few, you can go around 'em, but that's not what
you see on separated paths. They become edge-to-edge crater fields
pretty fast.

Possible snow coming to the Willamette Valley tonight, but the
accumulation should be so low that studded road tires should do it.
When the "craters" are only 3mm deep, they're not so troubling.

Mark J.


Ice and snow in my neighborhood this morning. I didn't prepare and don't feel like throwing on the studs. I'll drive. I've got snow tires, and I haven't been off the bike for over a week.

-- Jay Beattie.
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  #2  
Old February 5th 19, 08:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 956
Default Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:19:40 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:02:21 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/3/2019 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-03 14:41, Steve Weeks wrote:
Here in Chicago, the bike lanes are rarely kept plowed, which puts me
in the narrower-by-the-width-of 2-bike-lanes traffic lane. On
narrower streets, this is a real problem. Even on wider streets where
there are no bollards or any other physical obstacles between the
traffic lane and the bike lane, the bike lane is usually not plowed.
Sort of un-clear on the concept.


One solution but I'd get studded tires:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIpqfIXzKkQ


My impression of the video is that the snow being plowed has very low
moisture content, i.e. it doesn't weigh much. It's also "virgin"
un-walked-upon snow. When I lived in Colorado, I shoveled some of that;
could have cleared it with a push broom - or probably a leaf blower. We
get much heavier stuff in Western Oregon.

What Jay said about refrozen, walked-upon (especially high moisture
content) snow is on the money; it's hard to describe riding on that
stuff, except that mostly you can't (or at least I can't), and that's
with studded mountain tires. I refer to it as "craters of the moon", if
the craters were around 2-3" in diameter with tall, hard sides. If the
craters (footprints) are few, you can go around 'em, but that's not what
you see on separated paths. They become edge-to-edge crater fields
pretty fast.

Possible snow coming to the Willamette Valley tonight, but the
accumulation should be so low that studded road tires should do it.
When the "craters" are only 3mm deep, they're not so troubling.

Mark J.


Ice and snow in my neighborhood this morning. I didn't prepare and don't feel like throwing on the studs. I'll drive. I've got snow tires, and I haven't been off the bike for over a week.

-- Jay Beattie.


It dropped 4" of snow in the Altamont Pass last night and more in the Santa Cruz mountains. Must be more of that global warming.
  #3  
Old February 5th 19, 09:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,021
Default Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths

On 2/5/2019 1:23 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:19:40 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:02:21 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/3/2019 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-03 14:41, Steve Weeks wrote:
Here in Chicago, the bike lanes are rarely kept plowed, which puts me
in the narrower-by-the-width-of 2-bike-lanes traffic lane. On
narrower streets, this is a real problem. Even on wider streets where
there are no bollards or any other physical obstacles between the
traffic lane and the bike lane, the bike lane is usually not plowed.
Sort of un-clear on the concept.


One solution but I'd get studded tires:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIpqfIXzKkQ

My impression of the video is that the snow being plowed has very low
moisture content, i.e. it doesn't weigh much. It's also "virgin"
un-walked-upon snow. When I lived in Colorado, I shoveled some of that;
could have cleared it with a push broom - or probably a leaf blower. We
get much heavier stuff in Western Oregon.

What Jay said about refrozen, walked-upon (especially high moisture
content) snow is on the money; it's hard to describe riding on that
stuff, except that mostly you can't (or at least I can't), and that's
with studded mountain tires. I refer to it as "craters of the moon", if
the craters were around 2-3" in diameter with tall, hard sides. If the
craters (footprints) are few, you can go around 'em, but that's not what
you see on separated paths. They become edge-to-edge crater fields
pretty fast.

Possible snow coming to the Willamette Valley tonight, but the
accumulation should be so low that studded road tires should do it.
When the "craters" are only 3mm deep, they're not so troubling.

Mark J.


Ice and snow in my neighborhood this morning. I didn't prepare and don't feel like throwing on the studs. I'll drive. I've got snow tires, and I haven't been off the bike for over a week.

-- Jay Beattie.


It dropped 4" of snow in the Altamont Pass last night and more in the Santa Cruz mountains. Must be more of that global warming.


That's not Global Warming.

GW was actually last week, when Mt Carroll IL recorded a
minus 38F, the lowest temp ever recorded in IL. Thanks, Mr Gore!

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #4  
Old February 5th 19, 09:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,668
Default Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 11:23:37 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:19:40 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:02:21 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/3/2019 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-03 14:41, Steve Weeks wrote:
Here in Chicago, the bike lanes are rarely kept plowed, which puts me
in the narrower-by-the-width-of 2-bike-lanes traffic lane. On
narrower streets, this is a real problem. Even on wider streets where
there are no bollards or any other physical obstacles between the
traffic lane and the bike lane, the bike lane is usually not plowed.
Sort of un-clear on the concept.


One solution but I'd get studded tires:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIpqfIXzKkQ

My impression of the video is that the snow being plowed has very low
moisture content, i.e. it doesn't weigh much. It's also "virgin"
un-walked-upon snow. When I lived in Colorado, I shoveled some of that;
could have cleared it with a push broom - or probably a leaf blower. We
get much heavier stuff in Western Oregon.

What Jay said about refrozen, walked-upon (especially high moisture
content) snow is on the money; it's hard to describe riding on that
stuff, except that mostly you can't (or at least I can't), and that's
with studded mountain tires. I refer to it as "craters of the moon", if
the craters were around 2-3" in diameter with tall, hard sides. If the
craters (footprints) are few, you can go around 'em, but that's not what
you see on separated paths. They become edge-to-edge crater fields
pretty fast.

Possible snow coming to the Willamette Valley tonight, but the
accumulation should be so low that studded road tires should do it.
When the "craters" are only 3mm deep, they're not so troubling.

Mark J.


Ice and snow in my neighborhood this morning. I didn't prepare and don't feel like throwing on the studs. I'll drive. I've got snow tires, and I haven't been off the bike for over a week.

-- Jay Beattie.


It dropped 4" of snow in the Altamont Pass last night and more in the Santa Cruz mountains. Must be more of that global warming.


Actually, the polar vortex is part of global warming. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kevinan.../#13563625758f Snow in Portland is usual, although not usually in February. It is mostly a January thing. I don't know what's happening in Cali. Probably punishment from God.

You should go mountain biking in the snow. Snow is fun off road. It's less fun on the road -- with cars pin-balling around. Portland drivers are horrible in the snow. Go up to Tahoe -- pick up Joerg on the way -- and hit some of that fresh snow in the Sierra.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #5  
Old February 5th 19, 10:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,133
Default Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths

AMuzi writes:

On 2/5/2019 1:23 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:19:40 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:02:21 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/3/2019 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-03 14:41, Steve Weeks wrote:
Here in Chicago, the bike lanes are rarely kept plowed, which puts me
in the narrower-by-the-width-of 2-bike-lanes traffic lane. On
narrower streets, this is a real problem. Even on wider streets where
there are no bollards or any other physical obstacles between the
traffic lane and the bike lane, the bike lane is usually not plowed.
Sort of un-clear on the concept.


One solution but I'd get studded tires:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIpqfIXzKkQ

My impression of the video is that the snow being plowed has very low
moisture content, i.e. it doesn't weigh much. It's also "virgin"
un-walked-upon snow. When I lived in Colorado, I shoveled some of that;
could have cleared it with a push broom - or probably a leaf blower. We
get much heavier stuff in Western Oregon.

What Jay said about refrozen, walked-upon (especially high moisture
content) snow is on the money; it's hard to describe riding on that
stuff, except that mostly you can't (or at least I can't), and that's
with studded mountain tires. I refer to it as "craters of the moon", if
the craters were around 2-3" in diameter with tall, hard sides. If the
craters (footprints) are few, you can go around 'em, but that's not what
you see on separated paths. They become edge-to-edge crater fields
pretty fast.

Possible snow coming to the Willamette Valley tonight, but the
accumulation should be so low that studded road tires should do it.
When the "craters" are only 3mm deep, they're not so troubling.

Mark J.

Ice and snow in my neighborhood this morning. I didn't prepare and
don't feel like throwing on the studs. I'll drive. I've got snow
tires, and I haven't been off the bike for over a week.

-- Jay Beattie.


It dropped 4" of snow in the Altamont Pass last night and more in
the Santa Cruz mountains. Must be more of that global warming.


That's not Global Warming.

GW was actually last week, when Mt Carroll IL recorded a minus 38F,
the lowest temp ever recorded in IL. Thanks, Mr Gore!


Sunny and 63F today in balmy Massachusetts. Good thing it's not
Groundhog Day.



--
  #6  
Old February 6th 19, 07:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 956
Default Bike Lanes vs Bike Paths

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 12:06:49 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 11:23:37 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, February 5, 2019 at 7:19:40 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 3, 2019 at 4:02:21 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/3/2019 2:59 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-03 14:41, Steve Weeks wrote:
Here in Chicago, the bike lanes are rarely kept plowed, which puts me
in the narrower-by-the-width-of 2-bike-lanes traffic lane. On
narrower streets, this is a real problem. Even on wider streets where
there are no bollards or any other physical obstacles between the
traffic lane and the bike lane, the bike lane is usually not plowed.
Sort of un-clear on the concept.


One solution but I'd get studded tires:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FIpqfIXzKkQ

My impression of the video is that the snow being plowed has very low
moisture content, i.e. it doesn't weigh much. It's also "virgin"
un-walked-upon snow. When I lived in Colorado, I shoveled some of that;
could have cleared it with a push broom - or probably a leaf blower.. We
get much heavier stuff in Western Oregon.

What Jay said about refrozen, walked-upon (especially high moisture
content) snow is on the money; it's hard to describe riding on that
stuff, except that mostly you can't (or at least I can't), and that's
with studded mountain tires. I refer to it as "craters of the moon", if
the craters were around 2-3" in diameter with tall, hard sides. If the
craters (footprints) are few, you can go around 'em, but that's not what
you see on separated paths. They become edge-to-edge crater fields
pretty fast.

Possible snow coming to the Willamette Valley tonight, but the
accumulation should be so low that studded road tires should do it.
When the "craters" are only 3mm deep, they're not so troubling.

Mark J.

Ice and snow in my neighborhood this morning. I didn't prepare and don't feel like throwing on the studs. I'll drive. I've got snow tires, and I haven't been off the bike for over a week.

-- Jay Beattie.


It dropped 4" of snow in the Altamont Pass last night and more in the Santa Cruz mountains. Must be more of that global warming.


Actually, the polar vortex is part of global warming. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kevinan.../#13563625758f Snow in Portland is usual, although not usually in February. It is mostly a January thing. I don't know what's happening in Cali. Probably punishment from God.

You should go mountain biking in the snow. Snow is fun off road. It's less fun on the road -- with cars pin-balling around. Portland drivers are horrible in the snow. Go up to Tahoe -- pick up Joerg on the way -- and hit some of that fresh snow in the Sierra.

-- Jay Beattie.


The rain levels here are perfectly normal. The very cold events are also perfectly normal. Not often but normal. Of course the news always claims "The Coldest Temperatures Every Recorded" when it was a quarter of a degree colder than 1988 or 1975. And the temperature records have been counterfeited by NASA and we can show it since there were other people keeping the same records. You can plainly see that they totally erased the 1940-1960 warm spells and increased the temperatures for 1960 onwards. Sort of like "Stick up, your money or your life".
 




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