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Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL



 
 
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  #31  
Old February 12th 19, 03:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,943
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 7:27:02 PM UTC-5, Duane wrote:
Snipped
Need spikes on my shoes to walk up my driveway. Actually the first ones
I’ve owned.

Was sunny and cold today so the ice is still around. Tomorrow we’re
supposed to get 40cm of snow with winds gusting to 55k/h.

Good news is it was still light when I drove home today. With luck I
might be out on the road in 4-6 weeks.

--
duane


A number of years back it was really icy here and my sister who was ill at the time wanted something from the local dohnut shop. Here husband would not attempt to drive down the hill from their place to get to the shop. I took a couple of pieces of 1/4" plywood and drove a bunch of carbide screws through them. Then I attached a couple of toe-straps to each one and strapped them onto my boots and away I went. I had no problem walking even on the black ice. My BinL thought it was ingenious. The neatthing was they took up so little room that I could take them with me just about anywhere. They lasted me a number of years.

I read that some people take old tires and put carbide screws through them from the inside and then wrapp duct tape or Gorrila tape over the screw heads and use the tires as studded tires.

Cheers
Ads
  #32  
Old February 12th 19, 02:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 250
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On 11/02/2019 9:16 p.m., Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 7:27:02 PM UTC-5, Duane wrote:
Snipped
Need spikes on my shoes to walk up my driveway. Actually the first ones
I’ve owned.

Was sunny and cold today so the ice is still around. Tomorrow we’re
supposed to get 40cm of snow with winds gusting to 55k/h.

Good news is it was still light when I drove home today. With luck I
might be out on the road in 4-6 weeks.

--
duane


A number of years back it was really icy here and my sister who was ill at the time wanted something from the local dohnut shop. Here husband would not attempt to drive down the hill from their place to get to the shop. I took a couple of pieces of 1/4" plywood and drove a bunch of carbide screws through them. Then I attached a couple of toe-straps to each one and strapped them onto my boots and away I went. I had no problem walking even on the black ice. My BinL thought it was ingenious. The neatthing was they took up so little room that I could take them with me just about anywhere. They lasted me a number of years.

I think we get more snow and ice in Quebec. These are readily available
everywhe

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/m...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

I read that some people take old tires and put carbide screws through them from the inside and then wrapp duct tape or Gorrila tape over the screw heads and use the tires as studded tires.


You really have to be dedicated to do that. lol
  #33  
Old February 12th 19, 03:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 956
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 3:43:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 10:02:35 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 12:42 p.m., wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 2:37:27 PM UTC+1, duane wrote:
On 09/02/2019 4:36 p.m.,
wrote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:52:34 PM UTC+1, wrote:
The first is a clincher while the second is a tubeless. Why should a tubeless tire cost more than a clincher?

Not only do they cost more but you can almost buy a pair of the GP4000's that so many people use for the price of a single GP5000S. It's probably more than $100 for a GP5000TL in a shop in case you run over a killer piece of glass in front of a bike shop.

While Continental is the most popular racing tires (Vittoria is actually a better racing tire IMO) the reason I would change is because the MAXXI tubeless tires I'm presently running feel dead. They actually look narrower than a 25 mm Continental but I just went out into the garage and measured them and they are identical. So I guess the Continental is deeper.

They now have Goodyear tubeless tires and perhaps I try those for the Basso. They are a little cheaper and my experience with Goodyear car tires is pretty good even though I'm pretty negative about a lot of things.

In any case, the Continentals are WAY too expensive and while the top of the line Vittoria I have are tubeless I will use them as clinchers on my Colnago.

I guess I will wear the Maxxi's out but only on economic principles.

The 5000S are 41 euros here, the 5000TL 56 euros.

Lou


Have you tried the 5000S?

Not yet. I have a set in my 'operating theater' (for Jay) ready to be mounted on my go fast bike. It is still off road season here.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/wx7Xc2EZQHdbQTEG8



It's still TACX season here. lol


Our snowpocalypse fizzled. I rode on Friday. Saturday was snow and ice, so I took a day off and went for a walk with my recovering wife. We wore our awesome Chinese shoe spikes!

Sunday was skiing with my son in fresh, deep (in places) Cascade snow. Another bluebird Sunday -- sunny but cold on the mountain and dreary in PDX. There was a lot of ice and packed snow on the way up the mountain which really slowed the conga line to the resort. I miss my studded asphalt-eaters.

Howling wind and rain today. I expect my old Gore AlpX jacket to soak through on the way home. It's time for a new jacket. Even Nikwax wash and spray-on aren't doing the trick. Snow and freezing rain are now predicted for next week. If and when the freezing rain actually gets here, I'm driving -- or maybe just staying home.


-- Jay Beattie.


Be careful out there. They say that Seattle hasn't had that much snow since 1944. That would suggest that people don't know how to deal with it and there's nothing worse that speeding in possible icy conditions. Even in pouring rain here the loony young Hispanics will NOT change their stupid driving habits of swerving from lane to lane to gain 1/4th a car length. There is no lane that you can avoid them in. Even when I get up behind a tractor/trailer with only minimal space between us some jerk will swing through it without even looking to see if there's a car in the next lane passing me that he will hit if he goes straight through. Scares hell out of me all the time and the people in the lane over have to slam their brakes on in the rain. Of course they are also speeding.
  #34  
Old February 12th 19, 05:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,943
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 8:00:55 AM UTC-5, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 9:16 p.m., Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 7:27:02 PM UTC-5, Duane wrote:
Snipped
Need spikes on my shoes to walk up my driveway. Actually the first ones
I’ve owned.

Was sunny and cold today so the ice is still around. Tomorrow we’re
supposed to get 40cm of snow with winds gusting to 55k/h.

Good news is it was still light when I drove home today. With luck I
might be out on the road in 4-6 weeks.

--
duane


A number of years back it was really icy here and my sister who was ill at the time wanted something from the local dohnut shop. Here husband would not attempt to drive down the hill from their place to get to the shop. I took a couple of pieces of 1/4" plywood and drove a bunch of carbide screws through them. Then I attached a couple of toe-straps to each one and strapped them onto my boots and away I went. I had no problem walking even on the black ice. My BinL thought it was ingenious. The neatthing was they took up so little room that I could take them with me just about anywhere. They lasted me a number of years.

I think we get more snow and ice in Quebec. These are readily available
everywhe

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/m...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

I read that some people take old tires and put carbide screws through them from the inside and then wrapp duct tape or Gorrila tape over the screw heads and use the tires as studded tires.


You really have to be dedicated to do that. lol


You sure do get more snow and ice than we do here. Thanks for that link. I might get a pair of those for my niece. I also might get myself that windproof balaclava shown at the bottom of the page.

Those people who put carbide screws through an old pair of tires are desperate rather than dedicated. Besides it's a LOT cheaper than factory made studded tires.

Cheers
  #35  
Old February 12th 19, 10:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,668
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 6:58:42 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 3:43:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 10:02:35 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 12:42 p.m., wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 2:37:27 PM UTC+1, duane wrote:
On 09/02/2019 4:36 p.m.,
wrote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:52:34 PM UTC+1, wrote:
The first is a clincher while the second is a tubeless. Why should a tubeless tire cost more than a clincher?

Not only do they cost more but you can almost buy a pair of the GP4000's that so many people use for the price of a single GP5000S. It's probably more than $100 for a GP5000TL in a shop in case you run over a killer piece of glass in front of a bike shop.

While Continental is the most popular racing tires (Vittoria is actually a better racing tire IMO) the reason I would change is because the MAXXI tubeless tires I'm presently running feel dead. They actually look narrower than a 25 mm Continental but I just went out into the garage and measured them and they are identical. So I guess the Continental is deeper.

They now have Goodyear tubeless tires and perhaps I try those for the Basso. They are a little cheaper and my experience with Goodyear car tires is pretty good even though I'm pretty negative about a lot of things.

In any case, the Continentals are WAY too expensive and while the top of the line Vittoria I have are tubeless I will use them as clinchers on my Colnago.

I guess I will wear the Maxxi's out but only on economic principles.

The 5000S are 41 euros here, the 5000TL 56 euros.

Lou


Have you tried the 5000S?

Not yet. I have a set in my 'operating theater' (for Jay) ready to be mounted on my go fast bike. It is still off road season here.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/wx7Xc2EZQHdbQTEG8



It's still TACX season here. lol


Our snowpocalypse fizzled. I rode on Friday. Saturday was snow and ice, so I took a day off and went for a walk with my recovering wife. We wore our awesome Chinese shoe spikes!

Sunday was skiing with my son in fresh, deep (in places) Cascade snow. Another bluebird Sunday -- sunny but cold on the mountain and dreary in PDX.. There was a lot of ice and packed snow on the way up the mountain which really slowed the conga line to the resort. I miss my studded asphalt-eaters..

Howling wind and rain today. I expect my old Gore AlpX jacket to soak through on the way home. It's time for a new jacket. Even Nikwax wash and spray-on aren't doing the trick. Snow and freezing rain are now predicted for next week. If and when the freezing rain actually gets here, I'm driving -- or maybe just staying home.


-- Jay Beattie.


Be careful out there. They say that Seattle hasn't had that much snow since 1944. That would suggest that people don't know how to deal with it and there's nothing worse that speeding in possible icy conditions. Even in pouring rain here the loony young Hispanics will NOT change their stupid driving habits of swerving from lane to lane to gain 1/4th a car length. There is no lane that you can avoid them in. Even when I get up behind a tractor/trailer with only minimal space between us some jerk will swing through it without even looking to see if there's a car in the next lane passing me that he will hit if he goes straight through. Scares hell out of me all the time and the people in the lane over have to slam their brakes on in the rain.. Of course they are also speeding.



You do know I'm not in Seattle (?). Those damned Hispanics! Don't they know how to drive? They should go back to Hispania!

Drivers in PDX and SEA are bad in the snow -- which is odd, because everyone has a Subaru -- required by our Antifa over-lords, and a lot of people drive up to the mountains to ski. The Sunday trek up to Mt. Hood Meadows: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_Z8aAExNbs It looked like that last Sunday except more snow and more sun -- until noon, then it got overcast. Waaaah. Change to yellow lenses.

Shameless plug for my skis -- made by liberals in Portland. https://shop.on3pskis.com/ Great guys.


-- Jay Beattie.
  #36  
Old February 12th 19, 10:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 956
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 1:28:33 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 6:58:42 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 3:43:11 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 10:02:35 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 12:42 p.m., wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 2:37:27 PM UTC+1, duane wrote:
On 09/02/2019 4:36 p.m.,
wrote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 6:52:34 PM UTC+1, wrote:
The first is a clincher while the second is a tubeless. Why should a tubeless tire cost more than a clincher?

Not only do they cost more but you can almost buy a pair of the GP4000's that so many people use for the price of a single GP5000S. It's probably more than $100 for a GP5000TL in a shop in case you run over a killer piece of glass in front of a bike shop.

While Continental is the most popular racing tires (Vittoria is actually a better racing tire IMO) the reason I would change is because the MAXXI tubeless tires I'm presently running feel dead. They actually look narrower than a 25 mm Continental but I just went out into the garage and measured them and they are identical. So I guess the Continental is deeper.

They now have Goodyear tubeless tires and perhaps I try those for the Basso. They are a little cheaper and my experience with Goodyear car tires is pretty good even though I'm pretty negative about a lot of things.

In any case, the Continentals are WAY too expensive and while the top of the line Vittoria I have are tubeless I will use them as clinchers on my Colnago.

I guess I will wear the Maxxi's out but only on economic principles.

The 5000S are 41 euros here, the 5000TL 56 euros.

Lou


Have you tried the 5000S?

Not yet. I have a set in my 'operating theater' (for Jay) ready to be mounted on my go fast bike. It is still off road season here.
https://photos.app.goo.gl/wx7Xc2EZQHdbQTEG8



It's still TACX season here. lol

Our snowpocalypse fizzled. I rode on Friday. Saturday was snow and ice, so I took a day off and went for a walk with my recovering wife. We wore our awesome Chinese shoe spikes!

Sunday was skiing with my son in fresh, deep (in places) Cascade snow.. Another bluebird Sunday -- sunny but cold on the mountain and dreary in PDX. There was a lot of ice and packed snow on the way up the mountain which really slowed the conga line to the resort. I miss my studded asphalt-eaters.

Howling wind and rain today. I expect my old Gore AlpX jacket to soak through on the way home. It's time for a new jacket. Even Nikwax wash and spray-on aren't doing the trick. Snow and freezing rain are now predicted for next week. If and when the freezing rain actually gets here, I'm driving -- or maybe just staying home.


-- Jay Beattie.


Be careful out there. They say that Seattle hasn't had that much snow since 1944. That would suggest that people don't know how to deal with it and there's nothing worse that speeding in possible icy conditions. Even in pouring rain here the loony young Hispanics will NOT change their stupid driving habits of swerving from lane to lane to gain 1/4th a car length. There is no lane that you can avoid them in. Even when I get up behind a tractor/trailer with only minimal space between us some jerk will swing through it without even looking to see if there's a car in the next lane passing me that he will hit if he goes straight through. Scares hell out of me all the time and the people in the lane over have to slam their brakes on in the rain. Of course they are also speeding.



You do know I'm not in Seattle (?). Those damned Hispanics! Don't they know how to drive? They should go back to Hispania!

Drivers in PDX and SEA are bad in the snow -- which is odd, because everyone has a Subaru -- required by our Antifa over-lords, and a lot of people drive up to the mountains to ski. The Sunday trek up to Mt. Hood Meadows: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K_Z8aAExNbs It looked like that last Sunday except more snow and more sun -- until noon, then it got overcast. Waaaah. Change to yellow lenses.

Shameless plug for my skis -- made by liberals in Portland. https://shop.on3pskis.com/ Great guys.


-- Jay Beattie.


Yes Jay, I also know that you're normally in the same weather pattern.
  #37  
Old February 13th 19, 12:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 508
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On 2/12/2019 8:21 AM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, February 12, 2019 at 8:00:55 AM UTC-5, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 9:16 p.m., Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 7:27:02 PM UTC-5, Duane wrote:
Snipped
Need spikes on my shoes to walk up my driveway. Actually the first ones
I’ve owned.

Was sunny and cold today so the ice is still around. Tomorrow we’re
supposed to get 40cm of snow with winds gusting to 55k/h.

Good news is it was still light when I drove home today. With luck I
might be out on the road in 4-6 weeks.

--
duane

A number of years back it was really icy here and my sister who was ill at the time wanted something from the local dohnut shop. Here husband would not attempt to drive down the hill from their place to get to the shop. I took a couple of pieces of 1/4" plywood and drove a bunch of carbide screws through them. Then I attached a couple of toe-straps to each one and strapped them onto my boots and away I went. I had no problem walking even on the black ice. My BinL thought it was ingenious. The neatthing was they took up so little room that I could take them with me just about anywhere. They lasted me a number of years.

I think we get more snow and ice in Quebec. These are readily available
everywhe

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/m...B&gclsrc=aw.ds

I read that some people take old tires and put carbide screws through them from the inside and then wrapp duct tape or Gorrila tape over the screw heads and use the tires as studded tires.


You really have to be dedicated to do that. lol


You sure do get more snow and ice than we do here. Thanks for that link. I might get a pair of those for my niece. I also might get myself that windproof balaclava shown at the bottom of the page.

Those people who put carbide screws through an old pair of tires are desperate rather than dedicated. Besides it's a LOT cheaper than factory made studded tires.


I made my first set of studded tires this way in 1984 or 1985. At the
time, I was not aware of any studded bicycle tire manufacturers, and
there may have been none available in the US. And the DIY studs /were/
cheap. PS - cutting open a shot inner tube to line the tire seems to
work far better than tape to protect the main inner tube from the screw
heads.

By the way, I just used sheet metal screws, which (I think) are
hardened, though not carbide, which I didn't know existed. Sheet metal
screws wear a lot faster than carbide, though I got two full seasons out
of them, and sporadic use since then.

No question, though, purpose-made (carbide) studded bike tires are
dramatically superior; I got a set of Nokians somewhere around ?2000?
2005? and they are great, though very expensive. They only get used a
few weeks a year here in temperate Western Oregon, mostly for black ice;
I built a spare pair of wheels so installation/removal is a five minute
operation.

Since then, many more mfr's are distributing carbide-studded tires in
the US, and I think prices have dropped.

Mark J.

  #38  
Old February 13th 19, 05:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,658
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On 2019-02-11 15:05, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 2:43:17 PM UTC-5, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 2:36 p.m., Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 12:47:34 PM UTC-5, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 10:28 a.m., Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-10 06:52, Duane wrote:
wrote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 7:56:22 PM UTC+1, Joerg
wrote:
On 2019-02-09 09:52, wrote:


I learned pretty soon that paying more than $20 for a
road bike tire is a waste of money. In fact, they can
be worse than expensive tires. Similar for MTB tires.

That depends on your riding conditions and requirements.
I ride on good roads on my road bikes and get 4500 km out
of a Continental 4000S(2) rear tire and expect the same
from the 5000 so price is not that important.

Lou



I get about the same mileage and very few flats. I think
I’ve had one flat in the last 10,000km and that was a tube
giving out when I hit a pothole hard. I ride on roads but
I can’t say they’re always good roads.

Maybe Joerg is riding his road bike on single track
carrying 4 gallons of water or something...


No but lots of hills. That seems to cause a lot more rear
tire wear than riding in flat lands. Some roads aren't that
great and some are unpaved where the fancy expensive tires
failed in their side walls too often. For example, when I
tested Gatorskins three out of four prematurely failed with
side wall damage. One actually blew a big hole out its side.
Vee Rubber tires and many others do much better in that
domain. They are more sturdy. So now I am buying those which
has also brought a nice cost reduction.


Use what you want but your experience is not my experience. I
do a fair bit of climbing and on some pretty crappy roads but I
still get close to 5000km on a pair of Conti GPS 4000 tires.
Works for me.

I too have no problems with my tires and I ride Northern Ontario
Canada mining roads that are barely maintained and in a lot of
places are like Joerg's roads. However, I do take care not to run
over big sharp rocks if I can possible avoid it. Maybe the threat
of having to walk for days to a road with motor traffic causes me
to be a bit more careful of my bike and equipment? I'd hate to
have to walk t0 of there pushing a bicycle simply because I did
not want to ride a bit slower. Remember too that my bicycle there
has about 40 pounds of gear on it. I carry a spare folding tire
just in case but thus far in over 20 years have never needed to
replace a tire when touring on those roads.

Joerg's world is different from anyone else's which is why he
needs extra special stuff.

Cheers


I don't do touring any more so I don't know what Joerg's issues
are. I carry a couple of tubes with me and a patch kit. I used to
get a lot of flats with cheap tires. Now they're rare. Quality
tires are worth the money.


But according to Joerg it's the expensive tires that give him the
most trouble.


That was so far my experience. I used to like Vredestein, Continental
and others. Then the sidewalls became ever flimsier, maybe because they
wanted to eke out the last fraction of a percent in rolling resistance.

After moving to Asian tires for both the road bike and the MTB the
problem of blown sidewalls has largely disappeared. It just happens to
be that those tires are also much less expensive which isn't the main
reason for me but it sure is a pleasant side effect.

Interestingly, a similar effect happened with disc brake pads. It always
irked me that they cost north of $15/pair at the LBS while lasting only
around 500-800mi on the front of my MTB. Then I found some from
Hangzhou-Novich that seem to have a material more like what is used for
motorcycles. Around $2/pair, great modulation and they last 1000mi.


I find that better quality tires give better feel on and to the road.
Also in winter in snow quality REALLY trumps the el cheapo tires on
many bicycles. The knobs on el cheapo tires freeze in the deep cold
and then act like skate blades with no traction at all. I found that
out 50+ years ago whilst winter commuting in Toronto Canada.


Vee Rubber didn't exist 50 years ago. Suggest to try again.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #39  
Old February 13th 19, 09:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 956
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On Wednesday, February 13, 2019 at 8:47:56 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-11 15:05, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 2:43:17 PM UTC-5, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 2:36 p.m., Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 12:47:34 PM UTC-5, duane wrote:
On 11/02/2019 10:28 a.m., Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-10 06:52, Duane wrote:
wrote:
On Saturday, February 9, 2019 at 7:56:22 PM UTC+1, Joerg
wrote:
On 2019-02-09 09:52, wrote:


I learned pretty soon that paying more than $20 for a
road bike tire is a waste of money. In fact, they can
be worse than expensive tires. Similar for MTB tires.

That depends on your riding conditions and requirements.
I ride on good roads on my road bikes and get 4500 km out
of a Continental 4000S(2) rear tire and expect the same
from the 5000 so price is not that important.

Lou



I get about the same mileage and very few flats. I think
I’ve had one flat in the last 10,000km and that was a tube
giving out when I hit a pothole hard. I ride on roads but
I can’t say they’re always good roads.

Maybe Joerg is riding his road bike on single track
carrying 4 gallons of water or something...


No but lots of hills. That seems to cause a lot more rear
tire wear than riding in flat lands. Some roads aren't that
great and some are unpaved where the fancy expensive tires
failed in their side walls too often. For example, when I
tested Gatorskins three out of four prematurely failed with
side wall damage. One actually blew a big hole out its side.
Vee Rubber tires and many others do much better in that
domain. They are more sturdy. So now I am buying those which
has also brought a nice cost reduction.


Use what you want but your experience is not my experience. I
do a fair bit of climbing and on some pretty crappy roads but I
still get close to 5000km on a pair of Conti GPS 4000 tires.
Works for me.

I too have no problems with my tires and I ride Northern Ontario
Canada mining roads that are barely maintained and in a lot of
places are like Joerg's roads. However, I do take care not to run
over big sharp rocks if I can possible avoid it. Maybe the threat
of having to walk for days to a road with motor traffic causes me
to be a bit more careful of my bike and equipment? I'd hate to
have to walk t0 of there pushing a bicycle simply because I did
not want to ride a bit slower. Remember too that my bicycle there
has about 40 pounds of gear on it. I carry a spare folding tire
just in case but thus far in over 20 years have never needed to
replace a tire when touring on those roads.

Joerg's world is different from anyone else's which is why he
needs extra special stuff.

Cheers


I don't do touring any more so I don't know what Joerg's issues
are. I carry a couple of tubes with me and a patch kit. I used to
get a lot of flats with cheap tires. Now they're rare. Quality
tires are worth the money.


But according to Joerg it's the expensive tires that give him the
most trouble.


That was so far my experience. I used to like Vredestein, Continental
and others. Then the sidewalls became ever flimsier, maybe because they
wanted to eke out the last fraction of a percent in rolling resistance.

After moving to Asian tires for both the road bike and the MTB the
problem of blown sidewalls has largely disappeared. It just happens to
be that those tires are also much less expensive which isn't the main
reason for me but it sure is a pleasant side effect.

Interestingly, a similar effect happened with disc brake pads. It always
irked me that they cost north of $15/pair at the LBS while lasting only
around 500-800mi on the front of my MTB. Then I found some from
Hangzhou-Novich that seem to have a material more like what is used for
motorcycles. Around $2/pair, great modulation and they last 1000mi.


I find that better quality tires give better feel on and to the road.
Also in winter in snow quality REALLY trumps the el cheapo tires on
many bicycles. The knobs on el cheapo tires freeze in the deep cold
and then act like skate blades with no traction at all. I found that
out 50+ years ago whilst winter commuting in Toronto Canada.


Vee Rubber didn't exist 50 years ago. Suggest to try again.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


I just ordered another pair of cheap Chinese carbon tubeless wheels. Since I will have a set of new Continental GP5000TL's and since MUCH to my surprise a tubeless tire actually is not as tight on a tubeless rim as a standard clincher I am going to try and blame my other carbon tubeless failures on the tires and not on the wheelset.

So after I get everything and assemble them and REALLY check them out for failures I will keep everyone apprised of how things are going. The 40 mm deep clinchers at less than half of the cost of a cheap Fulcrum aluminum wheelset us still working really well. I really like both the way they ride and the far more aero design that does NOTHING to destabilize the steering in cross-winds.

Fingers crossed.
  #40  
Old February 13th 19, 10:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,658
Default Conbtinental has come out with a GP5000S and a GP5000TL

On 2019-02-13 12:54, wrote:
On Wednesday, February 13, 2019 at 8:47:56 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2019-02-11 15:05, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


[...]


I find that better quality tires give better feel on and to the
road. Also in winter in snow quality REALLY trumps the el cheapo
tires on many bicycles. The knobs on el cheapo tires freeze in
the deep cold and then act like skate blades with no traction at
all. I found that out 50+ years ago whilst winter commuting in
Toronto Canada.


Vee Rubber didn't exist 50 years ago. Suggest to try again.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I just ordered another pair of cheap Chinese carbon tubeless wheels.
Since I will have a set of new Continental GP5000TL's and since MUCH
to my surprise a tubeless tire actually is not as tight on a tubeless
rim as a standard clincher I am going to try and blame my other
carbon tubeless failures on the tires and not on the wheelset.

So after I get everything and assemble them and REALLY check them out
for failures I will keep everyone apprised of how things are going.
The 40 mm deep clinchers at less than half of the cost of a cheap
Fulcrum aluminum wheelset us still working really well. I really like
both the way they ride and the far more aero design that does NOTHING
to destabilize the steering in cross-winds.

Fingers crossed.


Which reminds me, I also need a new wheel set for the old road bike soon
because the rims are worn from the brakes. Again. The spokes are tired,
the hubs are also getting old and the freehub is nearly shot (again
....). To my dismay I found that Nashbar doesn't have any wheel sets
left. Looks like they are shutting down :-(

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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