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Wider tires, All-road bikes



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 22nd 19, 04:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
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Posts: 7,147
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

Here's Jan Heine's latest on wide tire road bikes, or "All-Road Bikes."

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

I guess that link takes you to the most recent edition of his blog, so
when this post gets old you'll probably have to scan downwards.

- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #2  
Old January 22nd 19, 08:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 4,120
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:12:07 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 8:17:12 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Here's Jan Heine's latest on wide tire road bikes, or "All-Road Bikes."

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

I guess that link takes you to the most recent edition of his blog, so
when this post gets old you'll probably have to scan downwards.

- Frank Krygowski



This is one-step removed from the tweed ride. Look at these guys (from Jan's site): https://janheine.files.wordpress.com...pg?w=640&h=518

WTF is the deal with handlebar bags these days? One water bottle and a canvas handlebar bag? If you can stop for water, you can stop for whatever crap you have in the handlebar bag. The last thing I want riding on gravel is a bulky canvas handlebar bag to add swing weight to the bars. Mandatory wool jerseys and dynos. Gak. It all screams for attention.

I passed a guy riding into work today who had some uber fat Jan Heine/Grant Petersen approved retro bike with canvas bags and fat tires, steel frame -- all new. Who the hell needs 45mm tires and a bunch of canvas bags (in a wet climate no less) to ride to work? What a lug. I'm on 32mm for wet traction and sailed by. I'll switch back to 28mm tires as soon as the worst weather passes.

I ride gravel roads all the time on 25/28mm tires -- and even some single track. No special bike, because unlike James, most close-in gravel for me connects to pavement, and lugging around fat tires on hilly pavement is tiring. If I'm going to do an all-gravel or more gravel adventure, I'll take my gravel bike or my CX commuter.

It's odd to me that the Heine crowd puts down much of cycling as fashion driven and yet they are the biggest fashionistas imaginable -- re-imagining the past and dismissing as "plecebo" those things I prove every week, e.g., that heavy fat tires bikes are boat anchors. I'm sorry, I can feel the difference between a ProRace 25mm and the 32mm Zaffiro on my commuter.

Everything from the past was not better. It wasn't. Sorry. I am from the past and can say that with reasonable certainty.

-- Jay Beattie.


I convert MTBs to drop bars and 1.5 or 1.75 tires for asphalt/gravel/dirt road riding. What's nice is that the tires don't cost all that much certainly not 67.? pounds as the tires in the article are. Plus the 26 x 1.5 or 26 x 1.75 tires are fairly easy to come by. With an adjustable stem the bike can be adjusted for a low fast ride on pavement or a very upright position on grave or scenic routes if one wants too.

Cheers
  #3  
Old January 22nd 19, 08:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 4,120
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 11:17:12 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Here's Jan Heine's latest on wide tire road bikes, or "All-Road Bikes."

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

I guess that link takes you to the most recent edition of his blog, so
when this post gets old you'll probably have to scan downwards.

- Frank Krygowski


Good grief! They're wearing H****ts too! LOL

Cheers
  #4  
Old January 22nd 19, 08:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
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Posts: 294
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On 22/01/2019 1:12 p.m., jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 8:17:12 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Here's Jan Heine's latest on wide tire road bikes, or "All-Road Bikes."

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

I guess that link takes you to the most recent edition of his blog, so
when this post gets old you'll probably have to scan downwards.

- Frank Krygowski



This is one-step removed from the tweed ride. Look at these guys (from Jan's site): https://janheine.files.wordpress.com...pg?w=640&h=518

WTF is the deal with handlebar bags these days? One water bottle and a canvas handlebar bag? If you can stop for water, you can stop for whatever crap you have in the handlebar bag. The last thing I want riding on gravel is a bulky canvas handlebar bag to add swing weight to the bars. Mandatory wool jerseys and dynos. Gak. It all screams for attention.

I passed a guy riding into work today who had some uber fat Jan Heine/Grant Petersen approved retro bike with canvas bags and fat tires, steel frame -- all new. Who the hell needs 45mm tires and a bunch of canvas bags (in a wet climate no less) to ride to work? What a lug. I'm on 32mm for wet traction and sailed by. I'll switch back to 28mm tires as soon as the worst weather passes.

I ride gravel roads all the time on 25/28mm tires -- and even some single track. No special bike, because unlike James, most close-in gravel for me connects to pavement, and lugging around fat tires on hilly pavement is tiring. If I'm going to do an all-gravel or more gravel adventure, I'll take my gravel bike or my CX commuter.

It's odd to me that the Heine crowd puts down much of cycling as fashion driven and yet they are the biggest fashionistas imaginable -- re-imagining the past and dismissing as "plecebo" those things I prove every week, e.g., that heavy fat tires bikes are boat anchors. I'm sorry, I can feel the difference between a ProRace 25mm and the 32mm Zaffiro on my commuter.

Everything from the past was not better. It wasn't. Sorry. I am from the past and can say that with reasonable certainty.

-- Jay Beattie.


Going to have to agree with you there but then again, to each his/her
own as long as they don't bug me for my choices. Is it me or do those
guys look sort of grim?

BTW as for heavy tires, a guy passed me today on a fat bike.
Considering it was -22C and blowing snow I figured he was to mean for me
to mess with g. What the hell is this idea of snow and -22C? It used
to be warmer when it snowed...
  #5  
Old January 22nd 19, 09:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
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Posts: 7,147
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:12:07 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:

This is one-step removed from the tweed ride. Look at these guys (from Jan's site): https://janheine.files.wordpress.com...pg?w=640&h=518

WTF is the deal with handlebar bags these days? One water bottle and a canvas handlebar bag? If you can stop for water, you can stop for whatever crap you have in the handlebar bag. The last thing I want riding on gravel is a bulky canvas handlebar bag to add swing weight to the bars. Mandatory wool jerseys and dynos. Gak. It all screams for attention.


:-) Yet if they were in multi-colored lycra jerseys with team and
product logos, they wouldn't be screaming for attention? Hah.

I'm not going to say that those guys didn't make their choices based
on the fashion in their peer group. That happens with some of the
people in any peer group. But it's not a given. FWIW, I started
using handlebar bags in about 1975 and have used them ever since.
I don't stop to drink from my water bottle, and I don't usually stop
to take off my jacket, put on my hat, look at a map, grab a camera,
grab a granola bar, etc. All that stuff is in my handlebar bag
and easily accessible.

I passed a guy riding into work today who had some uber fat Jan Heine/Grant Petersen approved retro bike with canvas bags and fat tires, steel frame -- all new. Who the hell needs 45mm tires and a bunch of canvas bags (in a wet climate no less) to ride to work? What a lug. I'm on 32mm for wet traction and sailed by. I'll switch back to 28mm tires as soon as the worst weather passes.


Yes, I ride 28s or 32s. But if he likes 45, that's fine with me.
I have a couple friends who ride tires fatter than 35 (I don't know
the exact sizes). They seem to work fine for them.

It's odd to me that the Heine crowd puts down much of cycling as fashion driven and yet they are the biggest fashionistas imaginable -- re-imagining the past and dismissing as "plecebo" those things I prove every week, e.g., that heavy fat tires bikes are boat anchors. I'm sorry, I can feel the difference between a ProRace 25mm and the 32mm Zaffiro on my commuter.


FWIW, Heine likes light weight. He just seems to think that going to
ultra-narrow tires is counterproductive, even though they may be
lighter. That makes sense to me. We could debate the optimum tire
size, but we'd have to first spend time describing the road surface.
Because I'm sure narrow tires are not as fast on rougher surfaces.

Everything from the past was not better. It wasn't. Sorry. I am from the past and can say that with reasonable certainty.


19mm tires are now from the past! :-)

- Frank Krygowski
  #6  
Old January 22nd 19, 09:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
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Posts: 7,147
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 3:08:51 PM UTC-5, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 11:17:12 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Here's Jan Heine's latest on wide tire road bikes, or "All-Road Bikes."

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

I guess that link takes you to the most recent edition of his blog, so
when this post gets old you'll probably have to scan downwards.

- Frank Krygowski


Good grief! They're wearing H****ts too! LOL


Yes, like so many people, Jan Heine is a bit irrational about
helmets. Judging by photos in the magazine, he used to wear them
only when riding in the U.S., but not in Japan or Europe. More
recent photos show he's taken up wearing helmets in Japan, but still
not when he's riding in Europe. And in his blog posts, he's
indicated a fair amount of helmet skepticism. But one sits on his
head in almost all photos.

- Frank Krygowski
  #7  
Old January 22nd 19, 09:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,825
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:14:45 PM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:12:07 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:

This is one-step removed from the tweed ride. Look at these guys (from Jan's site): https://janheine.files.wordpress.com...pg?w=640&h=518

WTF is the deal with handlebar bags these days? One water bottle and a canvas handlebar bag? If you can stop for water, you can stop for whatever crap you have in the handlebar bag. The last thing I want riding on gravel is a bulky canvas handlebar bag to add swing weight to the bars. Mandatory wool jerseys and dynos. Gak. It all screams for attention.


:-) Yet if they were in multi-colored lycra jerseys with team and
product logos, they wouldn't be screaming for attention? Hah.


Not nearly as self-consciously. It's like they're making a point.

I'm not going to say that those guys didn't make their choices based
on the fashion in their peer group. That happens with some of the
people in any peer group. But it's not a given. FWIW, I started
using handlebar bags in about 1975 and have used them ever since.
I don't stop to drink from my water bottle, and I don't usually stop
to take off my jacket, put on my hat, look at a map, grab a camera,
grab a granola bar, etc. All that stuff is in my handlebar bag
and easily accessible.


All that stuff is in my jersey pocket. I will ride 100 miles with my reduced wallet, a couple Cliff bars, two GUs, my iPhone and that's it. If I need more, I stop. I can even put my rain jacket or vest in a jersey pocket. And if I wanted a bag, I would get a bigger seat pack. Handlebar bags add mass to steering, they rattle, etc., etc. Maybe I'd use one on a tour (even though I typically used low riders), but for a one-bottle ride? And if they were so good, why did they disappear only to become epidemic in the last year or so. This is like some weird fashion wave -- in leather and cotton. Cotton? Really? (yes, I know it "swells" and becomes magically waterproof and thus all the cotton rain jackets in the world).

I passed a guy riding into work today who had some uber fat Jan Heine/Grant Petersen approved retro bike with canvas bags and fat tires, steel frame -- all new. Who the hell needs 45mm tires and a bunch of canvas bags (in a wet climate no less) to ride to work? What a lug. I'm on 32mm for wet traction and sailed by. I'll switch back to 28mm tires as soon as the worst weather passes.


Yes, I ride 28s or 32s. But if he likes 45, that's fine with me.
I have a couple friends who ride tires fatter than 35 (I don't know
the exact sizes). They seem to work fine for them.

It's odd to me that the Heine crowd puts down much of cycling as fashion driven and yet they are the biggest fashionistas imaginable -- re-imagining the past and dismissing as "plecebo" those things I prove every week, e.g., that heavy fat tires bikes are boat anchors. I'm sorry, I can feel the difference between a ProRace 25mm and the 32mm Zaffiro on my commuter.


FWIW, Heine likes light weight. He just seems to think that going to
ultra-narrow tires is counterproductive, even though they may be
lighter. That makes sense to me. We could debate the optimum tire
size, but we'd have to first spend time describing the road surface.
Because I'm sure narrow tires are not as fast on rougher surfaces.

Everything from the past was not better. It wasn't. Sorry. I am from the past and can say that with reasonable certainty.


19mm tires are now from the past! :-)


I don't care what tires a person uses either, but when you claim that fat tires roll better and are faster than lighter, narrower tires (with their "placebo" effect (his words)), you're riding on thin ice. If that were true, the entire pro peleton would by riding 45mm tires. I think Heine found a niche and is working it as hard as he can. Next thing will be the superiority of toe clips and straps and nail-on cleats with free-range cow leather soles.

I rode and raced on 19mm SuperComp HDs, and they were fine. I like more of a footprint these days. BTW, the 28mm 4Seasons on my Synapse are really grippy. I was very impressed this weekend, riding them in the rain -- probably better than the 32s on my commuter. Like I said, I think its all about compound.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #8  
Old January 22nd 19, 10:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 4,120
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 4:54:35 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
Snipped
I rode and raced on 19mm SuperComp HDs, and they were fine. I like more of a footprint these days. BTW, the 28mm 4Seasons on my Synapse are really grippy. I was very impressed this weekend, riding them in the rain -- probably better than the 32s on my commuter. Like I said, I think its all about compound.

-- Jay Beattie.



Agreed!

I LOVED my 19mm Super Comp HD tires and I'd use them again in a heartbeat IF they were new and not NOS t hat have been sitting around for a couple of decades who knows where in the shop.

As I mentioned in another post in I think another thread, winter MTB tires I use are judged by the compound's grippiness not the price. Heck I've had MTB 26 x 2.125 tires that were so grippy on black ice (city buil;t temporary outdoor skating rinks) that I never bothered to try studded tires and that was because I never needed a studded tire for riding on ice. The ONLY time I considered studs was when i had a pair of cheap knobby tires that froze rock hard when really cold and thus had virtually no grip. Lean the bike with those tires just a bit on ice and the bike would slide out from under you. Compound is what makes or breaks a winter tire in my opinion. Others, their MMV.

CHeers
  #9  
Old January 22nd 19, 10:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Posts: 5,925
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On 23/1/19 8:14 am, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 1:12:07 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:

This is one-step removed from the tweed ride. Look at these guys
(from Jan's site):
https://janheine.files.wordpress.com...pg?w=640&h=518



WTF is the deal with handlebar bags these days? One water bottle

and a canvas handlebar bag? If you can stop for water, you can stop
for whatever crap you have in the handlebar bag. The last thing I
want riding on gravel is a bulky canvas handlebar bag to add swing
weight to the bars. Mandatory wool jerseys and dynos. Gak. It all
screams for attention.

A dynamo is something I will eventually add to my gravel bike, I suppose.


:-) Yet if they were in multi-colored lycra jerseys with team and
product logos, they wouldn't be screaming for attention? Hah.

I'm not going to say that those guys didn't make their choices based
on the fashion in their peer group. That happens with some of the
people in any peer group. But it's not a given. FWIW, I started using
handlebar bags in about 1975 and have used them ever since. I don't
stop to drink from my water bottle, and I don't usually stop to take
off my jacket, put on my hat, look at a map, grab a camera, grab a
granola bar, etc. All that stuff is in my handlebar bag and easily
accessible.


I haven't used a handlebar bag since some time in the late 80s. If I
was going touring I might consider it, but without one, I don't stop to
drink from my water bottle. I don't usually stop to put on or take off a
jacket. My hat is mandated by law. I don't stop to grab a piece of
fruit cake, unwrap it and eat it, etc. I do generally stop to take a
photo, but I can grab my phone and answer a call while I'm riding
(though illegal in Australia). All that stuff is easily accessible from
the pockets in my jersey, except my water bottle that is secured in a
bottle cage on the bicycle frame. I have also been known to carry a map
in my back pocket, but I generally stop to read one.

--
JS
  #10  
Old January 22nd 19, 11:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,260
Default Wider tires, All-road bikes

On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 10:12:07 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at 8:17:12 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
Here's Jan Heine's latest on wide tire road bikes, or "All-Road Bikes."

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

I guess that link takes you to the most recent edition of his blog, so
when this post gets old you'll probably have to scan downwards.

- Frank Krygowski



This is one-step removed from the tweed ride. Look at these guys (from Jan's site): https://janheine.files.wordpress.com...pg?w=640&h=518

WTF is the deal with handlebar bags these days? One water bottle and a canvas handlebar bag? If you can stop for water, you can stop for whatever crap you have in the handlebar bag. The last thing I want riding on gravel is a bulky canvas handlebar bag to add swing weight to the bars. Mandatory wool jerseys and dynos. Gak. It all screams for attention.

I passed a guy riding into work today who had some uber fat Jan Heine/Grant Petersen approved retro bike with canvas bags and fat tires, steel frame -- all new. Who the hell needs 45mm tires and a bunch of canvas bags (in a wet climate no less) to ride to work? What a lug. I'm on 32mm for wet traction and sailed by. I'll switch back to 28mm tires as soon as the worst weather passes.

I ride gravel roads all the time on 25/28mm tires -- and even some single track. No special bike, because unlike James, most close-in gravel for me connects to pavement, and lugging around fat tires on hilly pavement is tiring. If I'm going to do an all-gravel or more gravel adventure, I'll take my gravel bike or my CX commuter.

It's odd to me that the Heine crowd puts down much of cycling as fashion driven and yet they are the biggest fashionistas imaginable -- re-imagining the past and dismissing as "plecebo" those things I prove every week, e.g., that heavy fat tires bikes are boat anchors. I'm sorry, I can feel the difference between a ProRace 25mm and the 32mm Zaffiro on my commuter.

Everything from the past was not better. It wasn't. Sorry. I am from the past and can say that with reasonable certainty.

-- Jay Beattie.


What, you mean you don't like32 mm tires under fenders that rattle like everything is about to break? Who wouldn't miss that?
 




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