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  #1  
Old January 27th 19, 12:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe.

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.
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  #2  
Old January 27th 19, 08:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe..

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.


After a nights sleep and waking early and really heavy thinking on this subject I was bothered by something:

When I put the tube in the tire yesterday I pushed the tire back on by hand and without using the levers. A tubeless tire should NEVER mount like that..

Originally when I was buying tires the Michelin add said that the Pro4 Endurance was a "bi" tire meaning clincher or tubeless. Now looking all over the place the ads only say "clincher".

Though we had arguments here about the way tube and tubeless exert pressure on the rims let's not go through that now except to say that the same tire that blew off of the rim without a tube didn't give any problems with a tube in it.

The tubeless tires offer so many advantages that I have a very hard time wanting to retreat from them. In the really cold days we've had around here the Pro4's picked up a couple of what would have been a sure flat but no pressure was lost. Also the narrow roads I ride on offer no place to pull over to fix a flat and so it is very nice not to get one.

So at this point I am up in the air. The only way to solve this is to get some tires that definitely claim to be tubeless. I just bought a set of Maxxi's that are definitely defined as Tubeless And I'll go from there.

Other things: The sealant I am using was Orange Sealant. It was all over the inside of the tire surface. While you can wash this out there wasn't any water out on the road so I has to rub this stuff out as good as possible by hands and wash my hands with my water bottle.

They recommend that you replace the sealant every couple of months but it has been several months and there was very little sign of drying. Looking around again the advice has changed from "a couple of months" to "six months is a good figure". The last bike shop I was in that I trusted told me that Stans actually works better than Orange and it doesn't need changing for the life of the tire. OK, I'll also try this this time around.

When this tire went off it sounded like a gunshot blowout. It was so loud that I wouldn't tell which wheel it was for a couple of seconds so I couldn't brake. When I was dumped over I have only slowed to about 8 mph. If I had known that it was the front tire I could have put the rear brake on hard and probably stopped it with little damage to self. surprisingly the only damage to the bike was the levers being pushed out of alignment from my death grip.

My Pearl Izumi Winter Jacket doesn't even show a mark. I had some thermal tights on over some normal shorts so I only got minor abrasions on my elbow and hip. But my knee got a pretty good and large abrasion that will take a month to heal properly.

Now I can think of me going 35 mph just seconds before that blow-off. But with a clincher I've been in almost identical positions with a rear tire exploding from a large glass cut. I was going about 25 mph at that time and was lucky to be in a turn that was properly banked so when the back slid out I could steer up the banking and stop safely. So can we say that using any clincher, tubeless or tubular tire is safe?
  #3  
Old February 7th 19, 04:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe..

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.


OK - I got my new Maxxi Tubeless tires yesterday and the bead is substantially different from the Michelins I was using. You put the tubeless tire on and you have to be VERY careful to make sure that it is straight on the rim.. You do this by flipping the wheel and making sure that it is perfectly centered on the rim. And then you can pump it up with a regular floor pump. You don't need anything special. Also, the tire will remain completely inflated even without the sealant in there because there is a soft rubber bead and a special bead to catch the hook on the rim.

Also they aren't particularly difficult to get on. Certainly they were easier to get onto the rim than the Michelins although not anywhere as easy as the one that came off the rim causing me to crash.

I happened to have 2 more ounces of Orange sealant so I put that in the front tire since I have total faith in the ability of that sealant to seal just about anything. But there is Finish Line that I put in the back since if I get a read flat it is far less likely to cause me to crash. The advantage of Finish Line is that it is a permanent sealant that doesn't need to be renewed every six months like the Orange and most of the others like Stan's etc.

So you have to be extremely careful to get the right tire for the right job.. The Michelin 25 mm seems larger than 25 and the Maxxi's seem a little smaller than 25 mm but perhaps that is simply the way they fit on the rims.

I'll also have to look into Mavic who make tubeless tires now with the same manner of simply pumping them up with a standard floor pumps. Note: Finish Line sealant specifically says that you can use a CO2 cartridge to inflate them on the road because the stuff is good down to below freezing.
  #4  
Old February 7th 19, 06:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,668
Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 7:58:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe.

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.


OK - I got my new Maxxi Tubeless tires yesterday and the bead is substantially different from the Michelins I was using. You put the tubeless tire on and you have to be VERY careful to make sure that it is straight on the rim. You do this by flipping the wheel and making sure that it is perfectly centered on the rim. And then you can pump it up with a regular floor pump. You don't need anything special. Also, the tire will remain completely inflated even without the sealant in there because there is a soft rubber bead and a special bead to catch the hook on the rim.

Also they aren't particularly difficult to get on. Certainly they were easier to get onto the rim than the Michelins although not anywhere as easy as the one that came off the rim causing me to crash.

I happened to have 2 more ounces of Orange sealant so I put that in the front tire since I have total faith in the ability of that sealant to seal just about anything. But there is Finish Line that I put in the back since if I get a read flat it is far less likely to cause me to crash. The advantage of Finish Line is that it is a permanent sealant that doesn't need to be renewed every six months like the Orange and most of the others like Stan's etc.

So you have to be extremely careful to get the right tire for the right job. The Michelin 25 mm seems larger than 25 and the Maxxi's seem a little smaller than 25 mm but perhaps that is simply the way they fit on the rims.

I'll also have to look into Mavic who make tubeless tires now with the same manner of simply pumping them up with a standard floor pumps. Note: Finish Line sealant specifically says that you can use a CO2 cartridge to inflate them on the road because the stuff is good down to below freezing.



Read the directions. ProRaces are not tubeless ready. No Michelin road tire in the Power or Endurance road series is tubeless ready. That's why it blew off.

-- Jay Beattie.


  #5  
Old February 7th 19, 10:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
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Posts: 508
Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On 2/7/2019 9:50 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 7:58:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe.

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.


OK - I got my new Maxxi Tubeless tires yesterday and the bead is substantially different from the Michelins I was using. You put the tubeless tire on and you have to be VERY careful to make sure that it is straight on the rim. You do this by flipping the wheel and making sure that it is perfectly centered on the rim. And then you can pump it up with a regular floor pump. You don't need anything special. Also, the tire will remain completely inflated even without the sealant in there because there is a soft rubber bead and a special bead to catch the hook on the rim.

Also they aren't particularly difficult to get on. Certainly they were easier to get onto the rim than the Michelins although not anywhere as easy as the one that came off the rim causing me to crash.

I happened to have 2 more ounces of Orange sealant so I put that in the front tire since I have total faith in the ability of that sealant to seal just about anything. But there is Finish Line that I put in the back since if I get a read flat it is far less likely to cause me to crash. The advantage of Finish Line is that it is a permanent sealant that doesn't need to be renewed every six months like the Orange and most of the others like Stan's etc.

So you have to be extremely careful to get the right tire for the right job. The Michelin 25 mm seems larger than 25 and the Maxxi's seem a little smaller than 25 mm but perhaps that is simply the way they fit on the rims.

I'll also have to look into Mavic who make tubeless tires now with the same manner of simply pumping them up with a standard floor pumps. Note: Finish Line sealant specifically says that you can use a CO2 cartridge to inflate them on the road because the stuff is good down to below freezing.



Read the directions. ProRaces are not tubeless ready. No Michelin road tire in the Power or Endurance road series is tubeless ready. That's why it blew off.

-- Jay Beattie.


Careful relying on the CO2 when it's near freezing. The sealant may be
"good down to below freezing," but the CO2 cartridges not so much,
unless you use the old hunter's trick and keep 'em in an interior pocket
to keep 'em warm, and even then (how warm are /your/ pockets?)

The CO2 still "works," sort of, it's just that you'll get maybe half the
pressure you expected. That was my experience changing a flat at 28F,
anyway. Good to have a frame pump backup!

I talked about this with a physical chemist at school; we think it's not
an ideal gas law thing, but rather a phase-change (gas to ?liquid?)
thing, 'cause CO2 does funny things somewhere around "freezing." And of
course when you empty the cartridge, it gets colder still.

Mark J.

  #6  
Old February 7th 19, 11:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 956
Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 9:50:17 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 7:58:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe.

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.


OK - I got my new Maxxi Tubeless tires yesterday and the bead is substantially different from the Michelins I was using. You put the tubeless tire on and you have to be VERY careful to make sure that it is straight on the rim. You do this by flipping the wheel and making sure that it is perfectly centered on the rim. And then you can pump it up with a regular floor pump. You don't need anything special. Also, the tire will remain completely inflated even without the sealant in there because there is a soft rubber bead and a special bead to catch the hook on the rim.

Also they aren't particularly difficult to get on. Certainly they were easier to get onto the rim than the Michelins although not anywhere as easy as the one that came off the rim causing me to crash.

I happened to have 2 more ounces of Orange sealant so I put that in the front tire since I have total faith in the ability of that sealant to seal just about anything. But there is Finish Line that I put in the back since if I get a read flat it is far less likely to cause me to crash. The advantage of Finish Line is that it is a permanent sealant that doesn't need to be renewed every six months like the Orange and most of the others like Stan's etc.

So you have to be extremely careful to get the right tire for the right job. The Michelin 25 mm seems larger than 25 and the Maxxi's seem a little smaller than 25 mm but perhaps that is simply the way they fit on the rims..

I'll also have to look into Mavic who make tubeless tires now with the same manner of simply pumping them up with a standard floor pumps. Note: Finish Line sealant specifically says that you can use a CO2 cartridge to inflate them on the road because the stuff is good down to below freezing.



Read the directions. ProRaces are not tubeless ready. No Michelin road tire in the Power or Endurance road series is tubeless ready. That's why it blew off.

-- Jay Beattie.


I'm sure that when I bought the set it set "bi" meaning you could use it as a clincher or a tubeless. But I went to Michelin directly the day after the accident and they said that they only sell clinchers.

The Mavic and Maxxi tubeless tires mount with only a normal floor pump though you have to be careful that the tire is on perfectly straight and not pushed over one way or the other.

The bead has an exaggerated hook bead and the sidewall rubber near the bead is a soft rubber. GCN mounted a Mavic tubeless onto a Mavic tubeless rim solely with his thumbs. I couldn't do that with the Maxxi's though they were easier to get on than the Michelins.

Over time I will play around with the pressure so that I have a softer ride on the roads around here. At 90 psi I was getting a distinct bump from the bike lane markers.
  #7  
Old February 7th 19, 11:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 956
Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 1:20:08 PM UTC-8, Mark J. wrote:
On 2/7/2019 9:50 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 7:58:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe.

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.

OK - I got my new Maxxi Tubeless tires yesterday and the bead is substantially different from the Michelins I was using. You put the tubeless tire on and you have to be VERY careful to make sure that it is straight on the rim. You do this by flipping the wheel and making sure that it is perfectly centered on the rim. And then you can pump it up with a regular floor pump. You don't need anything special. Also, the tire will remain completely inflated even without the sealant in there because there is a soft rubber bead and a special bead to catch the hook on the rim.

Also they aren't particularly difficult to get on. Certainly they were easier to get onto the rim than the Michelins although not anywhere as easy as the one that came off the rim causing me to crash.

I happened to have 2 more ounces of Orange sealant so I put that in the front tire since I have total faith in the ability of that sealant to seal just about anything. But there is Finish Line that I put in the back since if I get a read flat it is far less likely to cause me to crash. The advantage of Finish Line is that it is a permanent sealant that doesn't need to be renewed every six months like the Orange and most of the others like Stan's etc.

So you have to be extremely careful to get the right tire for the right job. The Michelin 25 mm seems larger than 25 and the Maxxi's seem a little smaller than 25 mm but perhaps that is simply the way they fit on the rims.

I'll also have to look into Mavic who make tubeless tires now with the same manner of simply pumping them up with a standard floor pumps. Note: Finish Line sealant specifically says that you can use a CO2 cartridge to inflate them on the road because the stuff is good down to below freezing.



Read the directions. ProRaces are not tubeless ready. No Michelin road tire in the Power or Endurance road series is tubeless ready. That's why it blew off.

-- Jay Beattie.


Careful relying on the CO2 when it's near freezing. The sealant may be
"good down to below freezing," but the CO2 cartridges not so much,
unless you use the old hunter's trick and keep 'em in an interior pocket
to keep 'em warm, and even then (how warm are /your/ pockets?)

The CO2 still "works," sort of, it's just that you'll get maybe half the
pressure you expected. That was my experience changing a flat at 28F,
anyway. Good to have a frame pump backup!

I talked about this with a physical chemist at school; we think it's not
an ideal gas law thing, but rather a phase-change (gas to ?liquid?)
thing, 'cause CO2 does funny things somewhere around "freezing." And of
course when you empty the cartridge, it gets colder still.

Mark J.


I doubt that I'll need a CO2 cartridge now that I have proper tubeless tires.

One of them mounted and pumped right up. I couldn't do ANYTHING to get the other one inflated until I re-read the directions and they said that you had to have the center of the tire centered on the rim. You spin the wheel and look for any off-center areas. Once I did that it inflated with no problems whatsoever. They are different than tube tires and it will take getting used to. CGN did a test of sealants and they liked the Finish Line. I like it because it is good for the life of the tire and none of the rest are.
  #8  
Old February 7th 19, 11:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,943
Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 4:20:08 PM UTC-5, Mark J. wrote:
Snipped
Careful relying on the CO2 when it's near freezing. The sealant may be
"good down to below freezing," but the CO2 cartridges not so much,
unless you use the old hunter's trick and keep 'em in an interior pocket
to keep 'em warm, and even then (how warm are /your/ pockets?)

The CO2 still "works," sort of, it's just that you'll get maybe half the
pressure you expected. That was my experience changing a flat at 28F,
anyway. Good to have a frame pump backup!

I talked about this with a physical chemist at school; we think it's not
an ideal gas law thing, but rather a phase-change (gas to ?liquid?)
thing, 'cause CO2 does funny things somewhere around "freezing." And of
course when you empty the cartridge, it gets colder still.

Mark J.


Same thing with fuels for camping stoves. Even some naptha stoves require burning a starter paste to warm things up enough so that the fuel flows.

Ditto for batteries which is why I use external battery lights. I can put the battery inside my jacket where it stays quite warm. I also carry a spare just in case. I've seen a few dynamo lights in winter but the light they throw at slow speed is NOT enough for MY needs and wants.

Cheers
  #9  
Old February 8th 19, 02:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,668
Default Yeah, yeah, yeah, You told me so

On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 2:15:30 PM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 9:50:17 AM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, February 7, 2019 at 7:58:48 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Saturday, January 26, 2019 at 3:59:53 PM UTC-8, wrote:
I was doing a hilly ride today. I came down out of the hills at 35 mph and stopped at a stop sign in the downtown Oakland Broadway. I came to a stop light and waited. A couple of other guys caught up with me. As I pull off on the green I accelerated up to perhaps 12 mph and that damned tubeless tire blew completely off the rim. It had about 90 psi at the beginning of the ride so it wasn't too high nor too low pressure.

I hit pretty hard but with so many clothes on because of the cold, I got relatively light injuries though it's a damn good thing that I had out-accelerated the cars and they saw it happen and had time to swerve out of the way as I landed almost in the middle of the street. The other two cyclist helped me up. After a couple of minutes I installed a tube and inflated it and rode home.

So I am now off of tubeless tires with actual proof that they aren't safe.

BTW, I fell on my side and slapped the helmet on the ground and it is broken.

OK - I got my new Maxxi Tubeless tires yesterday and the bead is substantially different from the Michelins I was using. You put the tubeless tire on and you have to be VERY careful to make sure that it is straight on the rim. You do this by flipping the wheel and making sure that it is perfectly centered on the rim. And then you can pump it up with a regular floor pump. You don't need anything special. Also, the tire will remain completely inflated even without the sealant in there because there is a soft rubber bead and a special bead to catch the hook on the rim.

Also they aren't particularly difficult to get on. Certainly they were easier to get onto the rim than the Michelins although not anywhere as easy as the one that came off the rim causing me to crash.

I happened to have 2 more ounces of Orange sealant so I put that in the front tire since I have total faith in the ability of that sealant to seal just about anything. But there is Finish Line that I put in the back since if I get a read flat it is far less likely to cause me to crash. The advantage of Finish Line is that it is a permanent sealant that doesn't need to be renewed every six months like the Orange and most of the others like Stan's etc.

So you have to be extremely careful to get the right tire for the right job. The Michelin 25 mm seems larger than 25 and the Maxxi's seem a little smaller than 25 mm but perhaps that is simply the way they fit on the rims.

I'll also have to look into Mavic who make tubeless tires now with the same manner of simply pumping them up with a standard floor pumps. Note: Finish Line sealant specifically says that you can use a CO2 cartridge to inflate them on the road because the stuff is good down to below freezing.



Read the directions. ProRaces are not tubeless ready. No Michelin road tire in the Power or Endurance road series is tubeless ready. That's why it blew off.

-- Jay Beattie.


I'm sure that when I bought the set it set "bi" meaning you could use it as a clincher or a tubeless. But I went to Michelin directly the day after the accident and they said that they only sell clinchers.

The Mavic and Maxxi tubeless tires mount with only a normal floor pump though you have to be careful that the tire is on perfectly straight and not pushed over one way or the other.

The bead has an exaggerated hook bead and the sidewall rubber near the bead is a soft rubber. GCN mounted a Mavic tubeless onto a Mavic tubeless rim solely with his thumbs. I couldn't do that with the Maxxi's though they were easier to get on than the Michelins.

Over time I will play around with the pressure so that I have a softer ride on the roads around here. At 90 psi I was getting a distinct bump from the bike lane markers.


I didn't know you had to refresh sealant. Tubeless is like owning a pet. I hope they work out and are worth the hassle. I do like the idea of puncture resistance without the armored casings that ride like wooden wagon wheels..

-- Jay Beattie.

 




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