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  #131  
Old September 11th 17, 05:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,221
Default Taya Chain

On Friday, September 8, 2017 at 6:48:47 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/8/2017 6:00 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-08 14:51, wrote:

[...]

... Now I have black chain lube stains all over my hands.


Interestingly it gets black when riding lots of roads. On bike paths and
singletrack it doesn't turn black. I use the same lube (White Lightning
Epic Ride) for the road bike and the MTB. On the MTB I don't get black
hands unless I use it for valley errand rides when the road bike is down
for some reason like right now.

Which makes me wonder what all those bike path foes are doing to their
lungs.


There have been quite a few studies showing that bike commuters live
significantly longer than people who use other ways of getting to work.
Those studies have gotten that result consistently, even after
correcting for confounding variables.

So whatever road riders are doing to their lungs, it appears to be
beneficial overall. Cut the "Danger! Danger!" crap, Joerg.


But "Danger Danger" are Joerg's 2nd favorite threads, right after "Please Please Me".

Ads
  #132  
Old September 11th 17, 05:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default Taya Chain

On 2017-09-10 18:25, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 10 Sep 2017 07:46:08 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-09 21:41, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 9 Sep 2017 08:28:40 -0700 (PDT), jbeattie
wrote:

On Saturday, September 9, 2017 at 8:03:16 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-08 19:08, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, September 8, 2017 at 6:52:52 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 9/8/2017 3:06 PM, Joerg wrote:
O

Same with the tires BTW. They had 60k miles, still half the tread
but were well past 10 years. Looked good buy common
recommendations state that means it's time to buy new tires. Try
_that_ with a bicycle tire.

60,000 miles on the tires and they still had half the tread left?
Meaning your car tires would last 120,000 miles if they weren't too
old?

Joerg, you need someone to edit your fantastic claims, to give them
at least a _hint_ of plausibility.

Joerg needs to learn that tires have a shelf-life.
http://www.tiresafetygroup.com/tires...-in-six-years/ It's not
just about tread wear.


Age is exactly why I replaced them, as I wrote above. Good quality truck
tries can be pushed past 10 years but not much. It greatly depends on
whether the vehicle sits in the weather and sun all day. Mine doesn't,
it lives in the garage, protected from sunlight and weather. I also gave
the the occasional talc rub.


I defended a death case involving tread separation on a tire that had
more than half its tread left.


It happens. I had it happen on a brand new bicycle tire. Pieces flew off
to the point where I could barely push the bike home. But I had to
because nobody could pick me up on singletrack.


Bicyclists would be outraged if their tire tread fell of and killed
them! I can't believe what car owners put up with. They should make
car tires as durable as bike tires! And for a dollar. No, make that
$.50.


Gatorskin $45, tread completely gone after 2500mi.

Truck tire, $65, tread 50% reduced after 60000mi.

Any questions?

Nashbar City Rambler $9.99. Any questions? https://tinyurl.com/y8qdglvs BTW, your truck tire is about half the price of the tires on my Subaru and hardly typical of a decent all-weather tire from Michelin or other quality tire maker. And the Gatorskin is just over-priced, but then again, the price is based on the market. It's capitalism. Buy something else.

Now, you could go out and buy a hardcase tire that never dies, but it would be like riding on a wagon wheel. Go out and buy some of my Innova studs without the studs. Those are like tank tracks. I hate them.

-- Jay Beattie.

Seriously American truck tires last 120,000 miles? that is nearly
200,000 km.



No. Read more carefully. You shall not run a tire for a street-operated
motor vehicle all the way to zero tread. That can result in a nasty
hydro-planing crash during rain and then you'd be deemed at fault no
matter what, and rightfully so.


Why ever not?



Because if you cause a crash due to hydro-planing you are partially or
fully at fault even if the other driver ran a stop sign. Same as driving
soused. In some countries you can also get an expensive ticket for
riding on bald tires.


... When I was 16 years old I had a car. Not much of a car
I'll admit but I was the only kid in my high school class that actual
had a car of his own. But as part of the deal with my father when he
gave me the car was that I'd maintain it and pay for the everything
myself. I drove on tires that were so worn that the re-capping places
wouldn't take them.


Not everything we did at 16 was smart or legal.


Why did my father gave me the car? Well, because it was essentially
valueless. It had "died" and the junk yard wanted $5.00 to come and
haul it away so my father gave it to me. And I spent the next two
years working days, nights and Sundays to keep it running and put
enough gas in it to drive it Saturday nights.


I got a basket case pretty much for free, fixed it up and drove that car
for six years. Lowest cost of ownership I ever had in any vehicle,
certainly including bicycles.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #133  
Old September 11th 17, 06:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default Taya Chain

On 2017-09-10 18:15, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 10 Sep 2017 07:27:16 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-09 21:28, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 09 Sep 2017 07:50:11 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-08 20:39, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 08 Sep 2017 11:48:38 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-07 18:10, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 07 Sep 2017 07:19:58 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-06 16:50, John B. wrote:

[...]

... Given Vietnam's history
since, say the 1850's, the average Vietnamese is probably as happy
under the present government as they were under previous regimes.


Having met a lot of Vietnamese people, including people where not all
relatives made it out, I do not think this is true. I also had relatives
who had to live in a former communist country. They would have been shot
if they had tried to leave. Nobody will ever tell me there is nothing
wrong with communism.

As a general statement, those who escaped from Vietnam were people
with a certain amount of money. Call them the middle class.


Not the ones I met. They didn't have much more than the shirt on their
backs and most didn't own real estate over there or had much in terms of
other wealth. A simple bicycle was already considered a luxury.


And tell us, how did these penniless people buy the boat, provision
the boat, acquire sufficient fuel, pay the bribes to the coast guard
and navy necessary to start the voyage?


The same way they do it in Mexiko, North Africa or the Middle East.
Scraping money and tradeable goods such as bicyles, rickety motorcycles
and whatever together. Which unfortunately also meant that not everyone
in a larger family could get a boat ticket, it was only enough for some.
Talk to people that went through this. Sometimes tears will well up in
their eyes. For example, because they had to leave mom, dad and a lot of
others behind.

Or at least read up on it.

http://www.complex.com/life/2015/12/...es-vietnam-war

Quote "He ate rice with salted potatoes most nights". Is this the fare
of a rich guy?

Then, quote "In order to pay for his spot on the boat, my dad sold his
bicycle and organized a small group of people to escape on the same
trip. He said asking his mother for money was out of the question
because "if she knew, she wouldn't let me go.""

Later, quote "But by the fourth week, they were running out of bartering
goods, so my dad and other refugees stopped along China's uninhabited
shores to search for food in the jungle. They found guava trees and
loaded up on the fruit—which ended up making everyone constipated. "Back
on the boat, everyone was helping each other poop," he said".


Ah yes, you are describing the events told by a person who, describes
herself as "a writer, speaker, creative producer, and entrepreneur"
and wasn't born when the events took place which were told to her long
after they occurred.


Are you implying they lied?


They usually don't term it "lying" but still it is adding a
connotation that implies something that wasn't true.


You do not know that yet you are accusing her.


I've often told the story about my grandfather saying that when he and
my grandmother first moved to town he worked as a carpenter for $1,.00
a day. Which was true.

But he told the story of an example of how hard he worked and how poor
they were which wasn't true. But the facts are dollar a day was a more
or less a normal workingman's salary in the 1800's.


The Vietnam war wasn't in the 1800's.


Her father was described as, "My dad, who lived in North Vietnam's
capital of Hanoi, remembers the government rationing food stamps for
every citizen. He ate rice with salted potatoes most nights. After the
war, there was no freedom of speech, no freedom to travel, no freedom
to protest."

Interesting, but I wonder, really, as N.Vietnam had been governed by
the Communist government of Ho Chi Minh since 1945. But your site says
that "After the war, there was no freedom of speech, no freedom to
travel, no freedom to protest."

Do you suppose that 35 years after Ho Chi Minh had beaten the French,
and more recently chased the Americans out of his country, and sorted
out the Southerners that suddenly without notice things in Hanoi got
worse? Truly?


They did. The new government started a "cleansing action". Talk to
people from there. But ones that got out, the others may be afraid to
speak freely because that can have nasty results under communist regimes.


In the North? That had supplied the soldiers to fight the war? I find
no evidence that it happened. But even more revealing, they were the
people who were the victors. They had beaten both the French and the
Americans and "freed their country".


Yes, in the North. As I said, talk to people from there.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/25/o...ement-too.html

Quote "The dreaded security police rounded up hundreds of North
Vietnamese citizens, including party officials, senior military
officers, journalists, lawyers, writers and artists".



And a diet of rice and potatoes? As the writer was raised, as far as I
can tell, in the U.S. "potato" is probably intended to mean "white
potato" which as far as I know is not raised in Vietnam in commercial
quantities... but certainly makes for a good story.

And, again the implication is only rice and potatoes... when I was in
Vietnam people ate quite a variety of things, many of which while
possibly cultivated, also grew wild.

I agree that your story is a real tear jerker" but I suspect that like
many stories that parents tell children is that there is a limited
amount of truth and a whole lot of "how we did it in spite of all the
problems".


I believe the people I talked to and their stories were similar to this one.

And I have no doubt of it. But equally, we have the "guest workers"
who came to Germany to work in the factories and when their contracts
ended they stayed as if they went back to Turkey they wouldn't get
the"big money" that they were paid in Germany.


That's got nothing to do with it. In Turkey they wouldn't have been
rounded up by secret police and vanished back then. They could freely
visit relatives even if they stayed in Germany (and yes, most did that
for economic reasons). Nowadays I am not so sure about not being rounded
up anymore for people who have voiced too much of a "dissident opinion".


"During that time, Vietnamese refugees sailed to neighboring countries
where they could stay in refugee camps, while waiting for sponsorship
to resettle in countries like the United States."

Ah, the penny drops. If we can get to a refugee camp we'll be fed,
clothed and sheltered, and won't have to work, while we are waiting to
go to America where everything is wonderful.


Wouldn't you do the same if you lived in an oppressed country and in
poverty that is most likely to become worse? I sure would, I'd try
everything to get out if there is no hope in changing the status quo.
And yes, then I'd try to find out what the most promising destination
could be.


Well, to an extent I live in countries that are repressed. If you were
to speak disrespectfully about the King of Thailand you will probably
be sentenced to a number of years in jail.


Probably the same would happen if you'd anger the junta.


And guess what, the average Thai hardly thinks about it. Why should
he? It has always been that way, there is no material benefit in doing
it, so why bother?


I rather live in countries where such restrictions on free speech are
not imposed.


In Singapore, if you were to get up on your orange box and advocate
communism you won't even be tried in court. They will simply lock you
up under the "Emergency Laws" that have been in force since 1948.

Do the Singaporean worry? Well, I've been living in or visiting the
country for 50 years and I've never heard one mention it.


I doubt they'd make you disappear though.


When I lived in Indonesia if you loudly objected to the government you
could be "disappeared" and I personally know of at least one case
where it did happen.

The Indonesian population wasn't leaving the country in droves. Not at
all.


I lived in the Netherlands and two large immigrant groups back in the
80's were people from the Caribbean and Indonesians.


I might point out that in the mid 1800's the Chinese who came to the
U.S. already referred to it as "The land of fat pork" which is
probably a synonym for "Heaven" to a Chinese peasant who likely ate
meat once a year.... or less.

In short a story intended to elicited sympathy but very weak on truth,
or perhaps I should say, "replete with innuendos eliciting sympathy".



Nonsense. Talk to Vietnamese of your generation.


I have. In fact I met and had several long conversations with a N.
Vietnamese, or at least he was from Hanoi, and this would have been in
the 1990's. A young chap, he was in Thailand looking into the computer
business with the intent of importing computers from Thailand to
Vietnam and had been introduced to me as some sort of computer expert
as at the time I was writing a weekly newspaper column about
computers.

Strangely he gave no indication of being unhappy to live in Vietnam.


Talk to older chaps around your age. They know.

Vietnam has meantime adopted a lot of what Hungarians used to call
"gulash-communism", named after a rich and very delicious national dish.
A watered down version of communism where some enterpreneurial
activities are tolerated as long as that doesn't displease the local
communist party bosses. If you otherwise click your heels on demand and
behave compliantly you can have a life. At least somewhat. Would I want
to live there? Nope.


A couple of the people I've worked with over the years since the
1970's were married to Vietnamese women who had, with their American
husband's help, gotten their parents out of Vietnam. I never heard
them talk about oppression. They talked about how much better life was
here, largely because they were married to Americans who made a lot of
money.


Most won't talk about details until they know you really well. There is
still a large residual of the fear that was drilled into them by the
regime. This is why Vietnamese over here almost rebelled when an old law
forbidding members of communist parties from running in public office in
California was about to be abolished. Having known people who were
tortured under communism I understand their fear.


I would emphasis that in the, admittedly few, cases where I personally
knew the facts the "poor improvised boat people" had money, and
offered to pay for supplies. One in gold bullion.


None of them I met falls into that category. They were simple workers.


I've got a good friend who "escaped" from Hungary. He grew up and was
educated, served in the Hungarian army and graduated from collage,
under the communist government. I've asked him about live under the
communists and he had no complaints at all. His reason for leaving the
country? Well when he graduated from collage with a degree as a
chemical engineer the government had a job for him as a "food chemist"
and he wanted to work in the oil business.

In fact I firmly believe that the reason most people fled the
communists was primarily a financial one.... Ooooo I can make the big
money in the West.



That doesn't jibe with what I heard. One family fled communist
oppression from Hungary. One of them didn't make it, was shot while
crossing over. The fact alone that they made "fleeing the republic" a
crime punishable by immediate death speaks volumes.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #134  
Old September 12th 17, 02:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,061
Default Taya Chain

On 9/9/2017 10:56 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-08 18:52, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/8/2017 3:06 PM, Joerg wrote:
O

Same with the tires BTW. They had 60k miles, still half the tread but
were well past 10 years. Looked good buy common recommendations state
that means it's time to buy new tires. Try _that_ with a bicycle tire.


60,000 miles on the tires and they still had half the tread left?
Meaning your car tires would last 120,000 miles if they weren't too old?


Yes. Not 120000mi but 100000mi, with ease. I wrote half the tread and I
do not use tires until they are totally bald. It's not safe.


Joerg, you need someone to edit your fantastic claims, to give them at
least a _hint_ of plausibility.


You need to start buying good products.


You need to quit confusing your fantasies with reality.

From
https://www.consumerreports.org/tire...will-tell-you/

"From this extensive test program, we found that high-scoring UHP summer
tires last about 35,000 to 40,000 miles, including the top-rated
Michelin Pilot Super Sport. Add another 20,000 miles or so for most
high-scoring UHP all-season tires. The treadwear champ is the Goodyear
Eagle Sport A/S with an impressive 70,000-mile wear projection in our
test. But expect lower mileage if you drive aggressively and or have a
high-horsepower car."

The "champ" gets 70,000 miles. Your 120,000 and even your 100,000 are
fantasies.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #135  
Old September 12th 17, 03:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,171
Default Taya Chain

On Mon, 11 Sep 2017 10:12:15 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-10 18:15, John B. wrote:
On Sun, 10 Sep 2017 07:27:16 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-09 21:28, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 09 Sep 2017 07:50:11 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-08 20:39, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 08 Sep 2017 11:48:38 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-07 18:10, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 07 Sep 2017 07:19:58 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-09-06 16:50, John B. wrote:

[...]

... Given Vietnam's history
since, say the 1850's, the average Vietnamese is probably as happy
under the present government as they were under previous regimes.


Having met a lot of Vietnamese people, including people where not all
relatives made it out, I do not think this is true. I also had relatives
who had to live in a former communist country. They would have been shot
if they had tried to leave. Nobody will ever tell me there is nothing
wrong with communism.

As a general statement, those who escaped from Vietnam were people
with a certain amount of money. Call them the middle class.


Not the ones I met. They didn't have much more than the shirt on their
backs and most didn't own real estate over there or had much in terms of
other wealth. A simple bicycle was already considered a luxury.


And tell us, how did these penniless people buy the boat, provision
the boat, acquire sufficient fuel, pay the bribes to the coast guard
and navy necessary to start the voyage?


The same way they do it in Mexiko, North Africa or the Middle East.
Scraping money and tradeable goods such as bicyles, rickety motorcycles
and whatever together. Which unfortunately also meant that not everyone
in a larger family could get a boat ticket, it was only enough for some.
Talk to people that went through this. Sometimes tears will well up in
their eyes. For example, because they had to leave mom, dad and a lot of
others behind.

Or at least read up on it.

http://www.complex.com/life/2015/12/...es-vietnam-war

Quote "He ate rice with salted potatoes most nights". Is this the fare
of a rich guy?

Then, quote "In order to pay for his spot on the boat, my dad sold his
bicycle and organized a small group of people to escape on the same
trip. He said asking his mother for money was out of the question
because "if she knew, she wouldn't let me go.""

Later, quote "But by the fourth week, they were running out of bartering
goods, so my dad and other refugees stopped along China's uninhabited
shores to search for food in the jungle. They found guava trees and
loaded up on the fruit—which ended up making everyone constipated. "Back
on the boat, everyone was helping each other poop," he said".


Ah yes, you are describing the events told by a person who, describes
herself as "a writer, speaker, creative producer, and entrepreneur"
and wasn't born when the events took place which were told to her long
after they occurred.


Are you implying they lied?


They usually don't term it "lying" but still it is adding a
connotation that implies something that wasn't true.


You do not know that yet you are accusing her.


Not so. I do not know her and I am accusing her story as not including
all the facts.

In fact I believe that I said that she was repeating a story about
events that took place before she was born.



I've often told the story about my grandfather saying that when he and
my grandmother first moved to town he worked as a carpenter for $1,.00
a day. Which was true.

But he told the story of an example of how hard he worked and how poor
they were which wasn't true. But the facts are dollar a day was a more
or less a normal workingman's salary in the 1800's.


The Vietnam war wasn't in the 1800's.


Her father was described as, "My dad, who lived in North Vietnam's
capital of Hanoi, remembers the government rationing food stamps for
every citizen. He ate rice with salted potatoes most nights. After the
war, there was no freedom of speech, no freedom to travel, no freedom
to protest."

Interesting, but I wonder, really, as N.Vietnam had been governed by
the Communist government of Ho Chi Minh since 1945. But your site says
that "After the war, there was no freedom of speech, no freedom to
travel, no freedom to protest."

Do you suppose that 35 years after Ho Chi Minh had beaten the French,
and more recently chased the Americans out of his country, and sorted
out the Southerners that suddenly without notice things in Hanoi got
worse? Truly?


They did. The new government started a "cleansing action". Talk to
people from there. But ones that got out, the others may be afraid to
speak freely because that can have nasty results under communist regimes.


In the North? That had supplied the soldiers to fight the war? I find
no evidence that it happened. But even more revealing, they were the
people who were the victors. They had beaten both the French and the
Americans and "freed their country".


Yes, in the North. As I said, talk to people from there.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/25/o...ement-too.html

Quote "The dreaded security police rounded up hundreds of North
Vietnamese citizens, including party officials, senior military
officers, journalists, lawyers, writers and artists".


I am a bit confused in reading your undoubtedly factual newspaper
report as it refers to Ho Chi Minh being exiled to Beijing when I can
find no other reference to this "fact" anywhere.

I do read that " Ho Chí Minh died at 09:47 on the morning of 4
September 1969 from heart failure at his home in Hanoi, aged 79.

As for Võ Nguyên Giáp, also reported in your article as exiled, again
I find no record of this. I do, however, read that:

"He finally retired from his post at the Defense Ministry in 1981 and
retired from the Politburo in 1982. He remained on the Central
Committee and Deputy Prime Minister until he retired in 1991."

And:

"On 4 October 2013, a Vietnamese government official announced that
Giáp had died, aged 102, at 18:09 hours, local time, at Central
Military Hospital 108 in Hanoi, where he had been living since 2009."





And a diet of rice and potatoes? As the writer was raised, as far as I
can tell, in the U.S. "potato" is probably intended to mean "white
potato" which as far as I know is not raised in Vietnam in commercial
quantities... but certainly makes for a good story.

And, again the implication is only rice and potatoes... when I was in
Vietnam people ate quite a variety of things, many of which while
possibly cultivated, also grew wild.

I agree that your story is a real tear jerker" but I suspect that like
many stories that parents tell children is that there is a limited
amount of truth and a whole lot of "how we did it in spite of all the
problems".


I believe the people I talked to and their stories were similar to this one.

And I have no doubt of it. But equally, we have the "guest workers"
who came to Germany to work in the factories and when their contracts
ended they stayed as if they went back to Turkey they wouldn't get
the"big money" that they were paid in Germany.


That's got nothing to do with it. In Turkey they wouldn't have been
rounded up by secret police and vanished back then. They could freely
visit relatives even if they stayed in Germany (and yes, most did that
for economic reasons). Nowadays I am not so sure about not being rounded
up anymore for people who have voiced too much of a "dissident opinion".


"During that time, Vietnamese refugees sailed to neighboring countries
where they could stay in refugee camps, while waiting for sponsorship
to resettle in countries like the United States."

Ah, the penny drops. If we can get to a refugee camp we'll be fed,
clothed and sheltered, and won't have to work, while we are waiting to
go to America where everything is wonderful.


Wouldn't you do the same if you lived in an oppressed country and in
poverty that is most likely to become worse? I sure would, I'd try
everything to get out if there is no hope in changing the status quo.
And yes, then I'd try to find out what the most promising destination
could be.


Well, to an extent I live in countries that are repressed. If you were
to speak disrespectfully about the King of Thailand you will probably
be sentenced to a number of years in jail.


Probably the same would happen if you'd anger the junta.


Not so far. What happens seems to be that you are charged with what
would amount in the U.S. to defamation, in a civil court and if
convicted either fined or imprisoned. If the charges cannot be proved
then of course you are turned loose.


And guess what, the average Thai hardly thinks about it. Why should
he? It has always been that way, there is no material benefit in doing
it, so why bother?


I rather live in countries where such restrictions on free speech are
not imposed.


But you don't live in a country that has "free speech". Quite the
opposite in fact, even a quick search shows that there have been
innumerable cases where an individual was penalized for their "free
speech".




In Singapore, if you were to get up on your orange box and advocate
communism you won't even be tried in court. They will simply lock you
up under the "Emergency Laws" that have been in force since 1948.

Do the Singaporean worry? Well, I've been living in or visiting the
country for 50 years and I've never heard one mention it.


I doubt they'd make you disappear though.


When I lived in Indonesia if you loudly objected to the government you
could be "disappeared" and I personally know of at least one case
where it did happen.

The Indonesian population wasn't leaving the country in droves. Not at
all.


I lived in the Netherlands and two large immigrant groups back in the
80's were people from the Caribbean and Indonesians.


The Indonesians were probably largely Christians from the Ambon
Islands who had served in the Dutch East Indies Army (KNIL) and had
been evacuated to Holland when Indonesia became independent.

Subsequently quite a number immigrated back and the company I worked
for employed a number of them. Very different people from the Javanese
:-)


I might point out that in the mid 1800's the Chinese who came to the
U.S. already referred to it as "The land of fat pork" which is
probably a synonym for "Heaven" to a Chinese peasant who likely ate
meat once a year.... or less.

In short a story intended to elicited sympathy but very weak on truth,
or perhaps I should say, "replete with innuendos eliciting sympathy".


Nonsense. Talk to Vietnamese of your generation.


I have. In fact I met and had several long conversations with a N.
Vietnamese, or at least he was from Hanoi, and this would have been in
the 1990's. A young chap, he was in Thailand looking into the computer
business with the intent of importing computers from Thailand to
Vietnam and had been introduced to me as some sort of computer expert
as at the time I was writing a weekly newspaper column about
computers.

Strangely he gave no indication of being unhappy to live in Vietnam.


Talk to older chaps around your age. They know.

Vietnam has meantime adopted a lot of what Hungarians used to call
"gulash-communism", named after a rich and very delicious national dish.
A watered down version of communism where some enterpreneurial
activities are tolerated as long as that doesn't displease the local
communist party bosses. If you otherwise click your heels on demand and
behave compliantly you can have a life. At least somewhat. Would I want
to live there? Nope.

Yes, the Viets are not a stupid people and they saw what happened in
other countries in the region. Singapore, Thailand and later China
went from very primitive countries to a largely developed country in
less then a lifetime. Why not Vietnam?

But you know, anyone who has ever worked for the government or a large
company can see that the fiction espoused by pure communism is only
that, fiction.


A couple of the people I've worked with over the years since the
1970's were married to Vietnamese women who had, with their American
husband's help, gotten their parents out of Vietnam. I never heard
them talk about oppression. They talked about how much better life was
here, largely because they were married to Americans who made a lot of
money.


Most won't talk about details until they know you really well. There is
still a large residual of the fear that was drilled into them by the
regime. This is why Vietnamese over here almost rebelled when an old law
forbidding members of communist parties from running in public office in
California was about to be abolished. Having known people who were
tortured under communism I understand their fear.


It all sounds like a good story but frankly I doubt it. I knew a
number of couples - Vietnamese wife and American husband and I never
knew the wives to be a bit "close mouthed". Quite the opposite in
fact.

I distinctly remember the wife of the Project Manager I worked for in
West Java. His wife made several trips to Vietnam shortly after the
war in order to get her mother and father out to the U.S. and she
talked about it quite openly with no mention at all of any oppression.

But of course, her mom and dad hadn't fought against the North and so
weren't war criminals at all. Just regular folks.

Remember what the "Allies" did to loyal Germans who had never broken a
German law? They hung or imprisoned them.







I would emphasis that in the, admittedly few, cases where I personally
knew the facts the "poor improvised boat people" had money, and
offered to pay for supplies. One in gold bullion.


None of them I met falls into that category. They were simple workers.


I've got a good friend who "escaped" from Hungary. He grew up and was
educated, served in the Hungarian army and graduated from collage,
under the communist government. I've asked him about live under the
communists and he had no complaints at all. His reason for leaving the
country? Well when he graduated from collage with a degree as a
chemical engineer the government had a job for him as a "food chemist"
and he wanted to work in the oil business.

In fact I firmly believe that the reason most people fled the
communists was primarily a financial one.... Ooooo I can make the big
money in the West.



That doesn't jibe with what I heard. One family fled communist
oppression from Hungary. One of them didn't make it, was shot while
crossing over. The fact alone that they made "fleeing the republic" a
crime punishable by immediate death speaks volumes.


I can only comment on what I was told by the Hungarian friend I've
mentioned. I asked him about the so called "Iron Curtain" and he
laughed. He said that anyone with any sense could simply walk out of
Hungary as he did. He told me that he walked for two days through what
he said was dense forest and never saw or heard of any "Iron Curtain"
and went on to say that it was fairly common knowledge how to get out
of the country.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #136  
Old September 12th 17, 08:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,171
Default Taya Chain

On Mon, 11 Sep 2017 21:39:33 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 9/9/2017 10:56 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-08 18:52, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/8/2017 3:06 PM, Joerg wrote:
O

Same with the tires BTW. They had 60k miles, still half the tread but
were well past 10 years. Looked good buy common recommendations state
that means it's time to buy new tires. Try _that_ with a bicycle tire.

60,000 miles on the tires and they still had half the tread left?
Meaning your car tires would last 120,000 miles if they weren't too old?


Yes. Not 120000mi but 100000mi, with ease. I wrote half the tread and I
do not use tires until they are totally bald. It's not safe.


Joerg, you need someone to edit your fantastic claims, to give them at
least a _hint_ of plausibility.


You need to start buying good products.


You need to quit confusing your fantasies with reality.

From
https://www.consumerreports.org/tire...will-tell-you/

"From this extensive test program, we found that high-scoring UHP summer
tires last about 35,000 to 40,000 miles, including the top-rated
Michelin Pilot Super Sport. Add another 20,000 miles or so for most
high-scoring UHP all-season tires. The treadwear champ is the Goodyear
Eagle Sport A/S with an impressive 70,000-mile wear projection in our
test. But expect lower mileage if you drive aggressively and or have a
high-horsepower car."

The "champ" gets 70,000 miles. Your 120,000 and even your 100,000 are
fantasies.


Perhaps they didn't test the tires in California :-)
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #137  
Old September 13th 17, 04:44 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,889
Default Taya Chain

On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 12:09:46 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 11 Sep 2017 21:39:33 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 9/9/2017 10:56 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-08 18:52, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/8/2017 3:06 PM, Joerg wrote:
O

Same with the tires BTW. They had 60k miles, still half the tread but
were well past 10 years. Looked good buy common recommendations state
that means it's time to buy new tires. Try _that_ with a bicycle tire.

60,000 miles on the tires and they still had half the tread left?
Meaning your car tires would last 120,000 miles if they weren't too old?


Yes. Not 120000mi but 100000mi, with ease. I wrote half the tread and I
do not use tires until they are totally bald. It's not safe.


Joerg, you need someone to edit your fantastic claims, to give them at
least a _hint_ of plausibility.


You need to start buying good products.


You need to quit confusing your fantasies with reality.

From
https://www.consumerreports.org/tire...will-tell-you/

"From this extensive test program, we found that high-scoring UHP summer
tires last about 35,000 to 40,000 miles, including the top-rated
Michelin Pilot Super Sport. Add another 20,000 miles or so for most
high-scoring UHP all-season tires. The treadwear champ is the Goodyear
Eagle Sport A/S with an impressive 70,000-mile wear projection in our
test. But expect lower mileage if you drive aggressively and or have a
high-horsepower car."

The "champ" gets 70,000 miles. Your 120,000 and even your 100,000 are
fantasies.


Perhaps they didn't test the tires in California :-)


When I obtained my car a couple of years ago I bought a new set of the best BF Goodrich tires. After only 12,000 miles the tire man said that a set of used tires on my new car looked in better condition.

Yesterday when I did a short 36 mile ride with 2100 feet of climbing the only "good" road I saw was on 100 foot section of repaved road that wasn't done properly. So tires are getting eaten up by things like a 2" jump between the road and a bridge across a stream. On my ride these skips were "leveled" with pavement ramps.

Question: HOW could the roads be allowed to get in this condition? Easy - because politicians spend the money on these bright ideas they have and to hell with maintenance.
  #138  
Old September 13th 17, 05:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,221
Default Taya Chain


... After only 12,000 miles the tire man said that a set of used tires on my new car looked in better condition.


Uhm ... ya
  #139  
Old September 14th 17, 01:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,171
Default Taya Chain

On Wed, 13 Sep 2017 08:44:00 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 12:09:46 AM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 11 Sep 2017 21:39:33 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 9/9/2017 10:56 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-08 18:52, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/8/2017 3:06 PM, Joerg wrote:
O

Same with the tires BTW. They had 60k miles, still half the tread but
were well past 10 years. Looked good buy common recommendations state
that means it's time to buy new tires. Try _that_ with a bicycle tire.

60,000 miles on the tires and they still had half the tread left?
Meaning your car tires would last 120,000 miles if they weren't too old?


Yes. Not 120000mi but 100000mi, with ease. I wrote half the tread and I
do not use tires until they are totally bald. It's not safe.


Joerg, you need someone to edit your fantastic claims, to give them at
least a _hint_ of plausibility.


You need to start buying good products.

You need to quit confusing your fantasies with reality.

From
https://www.consumerreports.org/tire...will-tell-you/

"From this extensive test program, we found that high-scoring UHP summer
tires last about 35,000 to 40,000 miles, including the top-rated
Michelin Pilot Super Sport. Add another 20,000 miles or so for most
high-scoring UHP all-season tires. The treadwear champ is the Goodyear
Eagle Sport A/S with an impressive 70,000-mile wear projection in our
test. But expect lower mileage if you drive aggressively and or have a
high-horsepower car."

The "champ" gets 70,000 miles. Your 120,000 and even your 100,000 are
fantasies.


Perhaps they didn't test the tires in California :-)


When I obtained my car a couple of years ago I bought a new set of the best BF Goodrich tires. After only 12,000 miles the tire man said that a set of used tires on my new car looked in better condition.

Yesterday when I did a short 36 mile ride with 2100 feet of climbing the only "good" road I saw was on 100 foot section of repaved road that wasn't done properly. So tires are getting eaten up by things like a 2" jump between the road and a bridge across a stream. On my ride these skips were "leveled" with pavement ramps.

Question: HOW could the roads be allowed to get in this condition? Easy - because politicians spend the money on these bright ideas they have and to hell with maintenance.


Easy :-) I read that:

There are many reasons why the state's transportation hole has grown
over approximately the last 13 years. One is that the state hasn't
increased the gas tax since 1994, reflecting the political difficulty
of tax hikes. Part of the state gas tax is also calculated as a
percentage of the gas price, so when gas prices fall, so does the
state's revenue.

This year, the state gas tax fell by 6 cents per gallon. Overall,
revenue from gas and diesel excise taxes has dropped from $6 billion
to $4.9 billion over the last few years, Caltrans estimates.

But cheer up:

Fuel taxes and vehicle fees are expected to increase for California
residents after state lawmakers passed a major transportation funding
deal that aims to raise $52.4 billion over 10 years to fix a massive
backlog in road and bridge repairs.

Here's where the money would come from:

$24.4 billion by raising gasoline excise taxes. In November, the tax
will increase 12 cents per gallon, or 43 percent above the current
rate of 27.8 cents, and it will continue to rise over the next few
years. The total California gas tax is projected to be 46.7 cents in
July 2018 and 47.3 cents in July 2019. Starting in 2020, the tax will
change with inflation.

$7.3 billion by raising the current 16-cent-a-gallon diesel excise tax
by 20 cents.

$3.5 billion by increasing the state diesel sales tax from 9 percent
to 13 percent.

$16.3 billion from an annual transportation improvement fee based on a
vehicle's value. The fees range from $25 for vehicles valued at less
than $5,000 to $175 for vehicles topping $60,000.

And some miscellaneous millions from:

$200 million from a new $100 annual fee, starting in 2020, on
zero-emission vehicles.

$706 million in repayments of transportation funds previously loaned
to the state's General Fund.

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #140  
Old September 14th 17, 04:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,889
Default Taya Chain

On Wednesday, September 13, 2017 at 9:14:51 AM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
... After only 12,000 miles the tire man said that a set of used tires on my new car looked in better condition.


Uhm ... ya


I have only put 12,000 miles on my new BF Goodrich tires. I bought an 8 year newer version of the same car and thought that I should install the Goodrich's on the newer car. Turns out that the old car uses 15" tires and the new one uses 16" tires. But when he measured the tread depth of the used tires on the newer they have more tread left than the Goodrich's did anyway.

The guy I bought the newer car from told me that he bought the tires used from a tire dealer.

I do not drive hard. I usually come up to the speed limit and put the cruise control on. I do not corner very hard but generally more than most people because I know how to corner without skidding. I also know when not to corner hard.

Question: how is it that used tires have more tread depth than the tires on my car with top of the line tires I bought new and only put 12,000 miles on them?
 




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