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Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries



 
 
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  #91  
Old February 11th 18, 06:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,105
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2018-02-11 09:28, sms wrote:
On 2/11/2018 8:19 AM, Joerg wrote:

snip

Or in my case real electrical systems such as cars had them for
decades. Though I was surprised how few cyclists do this and that
still holds true today. Most just have blinkers with some tiny AAA
cells in there. The designers of those things usually weren't even
smart enough to integrate a low-battery warning so I often see riders
where the rear light has fizzled to the power of a glowing cigarette tip.


Those AAA cell lights are really annoying.

My favorite tail light is the CatEye TL-LD1100 which uses two AA cells.
It also is one of the few tail lights that still has side-pointing LEDs
as well are rear pointing LEDs.

Still available from Asia.
https://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/CATEYE-Bike-Bicycle-6-LED-Rear-Tail-Laser-Light-Bike-Back-Red-Light-Safety-Warning-Flashing/434036_32786881487.html.


Does it at least have a low-battery warning?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
Ads
  #92  
Old February 11th 18, 06:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,189
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 10:02 AM, Joerg wrote:

That is how I used dynamos in the past and would like to do that again.
However, in the US it is hard to find a reasonably priced complete front
wheel with a hub dynamo and I don't want to spoke up my own. So it'll
have to be a bottle dynamo (rollers went the way of the dinosuars) and
then I'd like to try Frank's mode with an O-ring and run it on the brake
surface nstead of the tire.


If we were ever to move to dynamos in the U.S. it would require that
bicycle manufacturers have their dealers offer a dynamo wheel upgrade
and light on new bikes at a reasonable price. Spending $200 on a new
wheel and another $200 on a decent dynamo light is just not going to
happen for almost anyone. Yet the extra cost to a bicycle manufacturer
would be small, $50 max for a higher-end SP or Shimano dynamo plus a 200
lumen headlight and a tail light. The shop could mark it up to $100.
  #93  
Old February 11th 18, 06:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,189
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 10:03 AM, Joerg wrote:

snip

Does it at least have a low-battery warning?


Yes, the LEDs get dimmer.


  #94  
Old February 11th 18, 06:26 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
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Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-11 09:28, sms wrote:
On 2/11/2018 8:19 AM, Joerg wrote:

snip

Or in my case real electrical systems such as cars had them for
decades. Though I was surprised how few cyclists do this and that
still holds true today. Most just have blinkers with some tiny AAA
cells in there. The designers of those things usually weren't even
smart enough to integrate a low-battery warning so I often see riders
where the rear light has fizzled to the power of a glowing cigarette tip.


Those AAA cell lights are really annoying.

My favorite tail light is the CatEye TL-LD1100 which uses two AA cells.
It also is one of the few tail lights that still has side-pointing LEDs
as well are rear pointing LEDs.

Still available from Asia.
https://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/CATEYE-Bike-Bicycle-6-LED-Rear-Tail-Laser-Light-Bike-Back-Red-Light-Safety-Warning-Flashing/434036_32786881487.html.


Does it at least have a low-battery warning?


Sure. There are six red LEDs at the back of the unit. When they get really
dim, your battery is low.

PS: What is the use of a low battery indicator on a device that is mounted
where you can't see it?

  #95  
Old February 11th 18, 06:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,847
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 10:55 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-10 18:25, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 19:25:57 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 2/10/2018 4:03 PM, Joerg wrote:

Everyone installing a high-powered LED light on a bicycle, front or
rear, should walk towards their lit bike during daylight and then again
at night. If the light is annoying, do something about it.

I agree with this.

But I'd add, before buying high powered LED lights, check out any more
ordinary lights you have in a similar way. Have a friend ride your bike
as you observe. I've done this many times with friends.

Contrary to current myths, you do not need super-powerful lights to be
plenty visible. Any headlight that shows the road sufficiently will be
perfectly visible to motorists, and taillights need far, far less power
to make you safe.



I had plenty of opportunity to compare StVZO tail lights versus the over
there "illegal" lights such as PDW DangerZone or Radbot. HUGE difference
in visibility.

Joerg, I don't think anyone disagrees that super-bright, non-compliant,
glaring lights make you more visible. Using an aircraft landing light
would make you more visible. Using an emergency vehicle light bar
http://www.fleetsafety.com/federal-s...led-light-bar/
would make you more visible.

What many people are arguing is that your extremes are not necessary and
not even appropriate. They are detrimental to other road users,
including other cyclists, and their promotion constitutes more fear
mongering. You're being no smarter than the asses who always drive their
jacked-up pickups with high beams, light bars and fog lights glaring.
It's MFFY behavior.

A bicyclist does NOT need headlights as bright as those on a 75 mph car,
just as he does not need 10 gauge spokes, motorcycle-strength chains,
solid flat-proof tires or all the other extreme equipment you call for.


- Frank Krygowski
  #96  
Old February 11th 18, 06:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,847
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 10:45 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-10 16:22, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/10/2018 3:54 PM, Joerg wrote:

On roads and also in towns where people tend to not pay enough
attention to cyclists I ride with full lumens, day or night...
I would not ride one mile in traffic without those.


We know.* "Danger! Danger!"


This is a classic example of you falsifying quotes. I wrote, quote "I
have installed diffusor lenses so people won't be blinded. I would not
ride one mile in traffic without those".

Out of courtesy to _others_ and not me.

Ever heard of brackets and dots to do a legit snip? And even then you'd
have been at tabloid quality.


The antecedent of "those" was not clear. But we're still left with the
fact that you use "full lumens" day or night. No matter what lenses
you're using, that's a "Danger! Danger!" mentality.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #97  
Old February 11th 18, 06:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,847
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 11:09 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-10 16:57, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/10/2018 3:27 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-08 16:50, Frank Krygowski wrote:

Then I realized my bottom bracket dynamo had snapped on because of
the jolt.
It was a near-perfect test of dynamo drag. Riding with it on cost me
one mile
per hour. Big deal!


If you are willing to give up 1mph this easy, fine. I am not and I
have found a much better solution.


Joerg, your arguments are monuments to inconsistency.

You've rhapsodized about stopping to smell the flowers, stopping to pet
the dogs and horses, taking time to find a nail and rock for a
Flinstone-style chain repair instead of using a chain tool... Yet now,
being slowed one mile per hour is somehow critical??


In the valley, yes. As you should have figured out by now riding along
major thoroughfares, even if they have bike lanes, is no fun at all for
me. I want to get that behind me and the faster the better. Vrooom,
vrooom, Diesel stench, yuck. Horses, dogs and so on are not to be met
there. They are met on singletrack here in the hills and on MUP in the
valley. Even on the long MUP along the American River I am sometimes in
a hurry when on an errand run.

To sum it up: _I_ want to be the decision maker on how fast the journey
goes, not some poorly engineered piece of equipment.


So is that the only place you ride?? You give the impression of
oh-so-gnarly
riding. Once again, your song changes wildly depending on your
argument.


If you had followed more carefully you'd have know that there are two
places I ride a lot: Here in the hills and then down in the Sacramento
Valley. As I wrote many times that valley is huge and very flat.
Nearly all errand rides have to head in that direction because that's
where nearly all stores are.


Yes, and you've given photos and videos of hilly off-road trails, and
said that your mountain bike has to be super-rugged to survive them, so
you've reinforced racks, built stout battery boxes, choose heavy tires
etc. because weight doesn't matter to you.


Weight indeed does not matter, sturdiness is all that counts for me. So
I have modified the MTB and to some extent the road bike (some of our
roads wouldn't be considered roads in the east).

On the MTB I do not care much if a ride on singletrack takes 15 minutes
longer. As happened on Wednesday where I spent 15mins with a horse and
then 5mins with another down the trail. Also watched a hawk who did fun
aerobatics which is a rare sight. I looked at the time at a particular
point where I'd normally barrel through at 1320h and it was already
1335h. So what?

When I use the road bike and have to be at a meeting at a particular
time that is obviously different.


Perhaps you'd make more sense if you took notes on what you've already
posted, then reviewed them before the next time you post.

Perhaps.


No, it would make more sense if you paid more attention to detail. Some
of us are not restricted to same old same old when it comes to riding.
Some of us have a road bike _and_ an MTB, and they use both kinds of
routes. The riding is _very_ different and so is the terrain turf. You
might also try to grasp the difference between utility rides and fun rides.


Again, you're a marvel of inconsistency. Weight doesn't matter on the
mountain bike because it has to be oh so rugged for your oh so gnarly
riding, including the off-road expeditions you've described to reach
your customers. But dyno drag equivalent to climbing eighteen feet in
mile is unthinkable?

I was talking about riding 20 mph with the dyno off, 19 mph with it on.
You pretend that's a critical difference for you? Over a 20 mile trip,
it would amount to three minutes difference. No reasonable person would
schedule utility trips so tightly that such tiny margins would be
important. If you did, you're going to be in trouble the next time the
wind shifts unexpectedly.

And wind does shift, Joerg. It shifts as frequently as your arguments.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #98  
Old February 11th 18, 08:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,189
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 10:26 AM, Ralph Barone wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-11 09:28, sms wrote:
On 2/11/2018 8:19 AM, Joerg wrote:

snip

Or in my case real electrical systems such as cars had them for
decades. Though I was surprised how few cyclists do this and that
still holds true today. Most just have blinkers with some tiny AAA
cells in there. The designers of those things usually weren't even
smart enough to integrate a low-battery warning so I often see riders
where the rear light has fizzled to the power of a glowing cigarette tip.

Those AAA cell lights are really annoying.

My favorite tail light is the CatEye TL-LD1100 which uses two AA cells.
It also is one of the few tail lights that still has side-pointing LEDs
as well are rear pointing LEDs.

Still available from Asia.
https://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/CATEYE-Bike-Bicycle-6-LED-Rear-Tail-Laser-Light-Bike-Back-Red-Light-Safety-Warning-Flashing/434036_32786881487.html.


Does it at least have a low-battery warning?


Sure. There are six red LEDs at the back of the unit. When they get really
dim, your battery is low.


LOL, that's what I said.

PS: What is the use of a low battery indicator on a device that is mounted
where you can't see it?


True. Plus sticking a couple of AA cells in your tool bag is not a big
deal. Running wires all over the bicycle to power lights from a central
power source has its drawbacks.

  #99  
Old February 11th 18, 08:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,054
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On Sunday, February 11, 2018 at 7:55:43 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-10 18:25, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 19:25:57 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 2/10/2018 4:03 PM, Joerg wrote:

Everyone installing a high-powered LED light on a bicycle, front or
rear, should walk towards their lit bike during daylight and then again
at night. If the light is annoying, do something about it.

I agree with this.

But I'd add, before buying high powered LED lights, check out any more
ordinary lights you have in a similar way. Have a friend ride your bike
as you observe. I've done this many times with friends.

Contrary to current myths, you do not need super-powerful lights to be
plenty visible. Any headlight that shows the road sufficiently will be
perfectly visible to motorists, and taillights need far, far less power
to make you safe.



I had plenty of opportunity to compare StVZO tail lights versus the over
there "illegal" lights such as PDW DangerZone or Radbot. HUGE difference
in visibility. This was as a motorist in Germany. Since I am also a
cyclist I paid particular attention to bicycle equipment because I
wanted to know. I also wanted to see if the purchase of some lights from
there would make sense since those wouldn't need electronics up front to
connect to the 8.4VDC power bus on my bicycles. My conclusion was that
it does not.


Where is "there"? Are you saying that the PDW light was no good and you need a 8.4VDC tail light?

At night, a watt or two is very conspicuous -- except in heavy rainstorms. The most conspicuous light I've every seen was this: https://tinyurl.com/yb5z9ep5 (minus the "beacon lights"). A woman with that jacket was riding east-west, and I was at a stop on a north-south street, and when my light hit her, I was practically blinded -- and it was only a 5-600 lumen light.

If you are really concerned about being seen, you should use high-viz and reflectors, but I know that interferes with your super-gnarly cotton outfits. During the day, I always see the high-viz before the lights.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #100  
Old February 11th 18, 11:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,847
Default Battery Replacement on Lights with Internal Li-Ion Batteries

On 2/11/2018 3:56 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, February 11, 2018 at 7:55:43 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-02-10 18:25, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 10 Feb 2018 19:25:57 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 2/10/2018 4:03 PM, Joerg wrote:

Everyone installing a high-powered LED light on a bicycle, front or
rear, should walk towards their lit bike during daylight and then again
at night. If the light is annoying, do something about it.

I agree with this.

But I'd add, before buying high powered LED lights, check out any more
ordinary lights you have in a similar way. Have a friend ride your bike
as you observe. I've done this many times with friends.

Contrary to current myths, you do not need super-powerful lights to be
plenty visible. Any headlight that shows the road sufficiently will be
perfectly visible to motorists, and taillights need far, far less power
to make you safe.


I had plenty of opportunity to compare StVZO tail lights versus the over
there "illegal" lights such as PDW DangerZone or Radbot. HUGE difference
in visibility. This was as a motorist in Germany. Since I am also a
cyclist I paid particular attention to bicycle equipment because I
wanted to know. I also wanted to see if the purchase of some lights from
there would make sense since those wouldn't need electronics up front to
connect to the 8.4VDC power bus on my bicycles. My conclusion was that
it does not.


Where is "there"? Are you saying that the PDW light was no good and you need a 8.4VDC tail light?

At night, a watt or two is very conspicuous -- except in heavy rainstorms. The most conspicuous light I've every seen was this: https://tinyurl.com/yb5z9ep5 (minus the "beacon lights"). A woman with that jacket was riding east-west, and I was at a stop on a north-south street, and when my light hit her, I was practically blinded -- and it was only a 5-600 lumen light.


My wife doesn't ride a night nearly as often as I do. She's most likely
to do it when we're on vacations somewhere, as transportation to and
from a B&B or something similar.

But her "normal" (not just cycling) lightweight jacket is by Illuminite.
It seems to reflect light very well - not that I consider that
necessary. Our bikes have lights and reflectors that are perfectly fine.


--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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