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New bike for Jay



 
 
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  #131  
Old August 2nd 17, 09:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,595
Default New bike for Jay

On Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 12:44:31 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/2/2017 1:51 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 10:00:13 AM UTC-7, Duane wrote:
On 02/08/2017 12:55 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 3:02:28 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 14:39, Doug Landau wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 1:18:40 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 08:45, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 8:18:39 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 7/31/2017 5:45 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/31/2017 4:24 PM, wrote:
What,abt the nww bike performance ?


I find that new bike performance is limited by my old
legs. YMMV

... and lungs. And ticker. Plus, the fire in my belly is
largely gone.

The fire sometimes comes back, though. We (my wife and I,
riding tandem) were on a pretty leisurely club ride a
couple weeks ago. A new young guy had showed up, and we
were riding along chatting with him. He said he rides to
stay in shape for his other sports, etc.

As we talked, one of our club members who's notorious for
such behavior decided to hit high gear and crank away out
front for a while, then wait for the rest of the crew to
catch up. When he did that, the newbie suddenly ended our
conversation, saying something like "Excuse me now..." and
took off.

I though "Excuse me???" and told my wife "Let's go." So we
reeled him in and were a comfortable ten feet behind when
he caught the rabbit. For icing on the cake, our rabbit
guy (as he always does) left the leisurely riders for the
last five miles or so to crank in at 20 - 25 mph . My wife
and I were close behind, and the newbie was a distant
third. It was quite satisfying.

But with a tandem, terrain is everything. If it weren't
fairly flat, we'd happily ride back with the leisurely
crowd.

(P.S. Don't interpret this tale as a claim that I could
stick with Jay, Tom or Duane, let alone James.)

I'm old and slow. I wouldn't ride with you because you'd be
in the middle of the road. I'd keep saying, "hey Frank, get
over here. You're going to get whacked." You would scold me
for being a gutter bunny, although I don't ride on the fog
line and rarely ride anywhere with a gutter. We'd ride up on
Joerg who would have a pannier full of water, a couple CPUs
and a growler. He'd be complaining about psychopaths in cars
and the fact that his Gazelle didn't come with factory
rack-mounts and room for 35mm steel belted tires or a o-ring
chain. He'd have to stop every fifteen minutes to pee. I
don't think this NG would want to ride together.


Only one pee on a 4-5h ride. My PSA test came back 0.4ng/ml so
no "urge to go" from that department. However, I might bow out
of the r.b.t. peloton the millisecond I spot a brewpub. You son
would probably already be in the next county by then and leave
us old farts behind.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

My feeling on the matter is: Do NOT drink a 12-pack of beer the
nite before riding the 5 Miles of Hell trail in Utah.


No 12-packs from the store here, it's only our own brew. The good
stuff.

Depends where you buy your beer. My local store has an awesome
selection:
http://www.rainydayportland.com/2012...multnomah.html


Here is our Marco's Cafe, in the middle of this page:

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/gold-country-ca

Great place. Food is mediocre at best but good brews and good live
music. With dancing.


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every Portland
street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries You can get good
Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection but it's
adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it only matters during
rides. On some MTB rides far off civilization I take a home brew along.
Surpringly it stays very cool in a stainless double-wall thermos and the
constant shaking doesn't seem to harm it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or mead. Hell,
I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are also in
Portland. Where else?

Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.



I don't know. My boss just brought me a bottle of Elijah Craig 12 year
old small batch bourbon. They don't sell it in Quebec but she lives in
Ontario. Not sure what you mean by artisanal liquor but this stuff is
good. Makes me miss New Orleans where I can grab it at the Breaux Mart
along with my tasso and andouille.


I don't have the palate, and brown liquor tends to give me a headache. When the Scotch snobs convene, I zone out and leaf through Velo News. I follow beer a little bit because it is a big economic driver around here and basically a local pastime like Timbers' soccer or flogging Donald Trump. http://oregoncraftbeer.org/facts/

We do have a burgeoning craft distilling culture, but going to a single tasting would disable me for a week. I was getting some post-ski pizza with the family in Hood River and stumbled across a craft-ish distillery tasting room. It looked very inviting. http://www.drinkmemag.com/wp-content...-in-Oregon.jpg My wife looked at me and shook her head. Too far home on the Gorge in winter . . . at night.


Yep, Oregon is special, just like everyone else:
https://www.deathsdoorspirits.com/


Cool name, which from my experience is about half the battle. I'm going to this place and create my own brand. http://citrusdistillers.com/create-brand/create-vodka/

-- Jay Beattie.
Ads
  #132  
Old August 2nd 17, 09:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,900
Default New bike for Jay

On 02/08/2017 4:04 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 12:44:31 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/2/2017 1:51 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 10:00:13 AM UTC-7, Duane wrote:
On 02/08/2017 12:55 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 3:02:28 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 14:39, Doug Landau wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 1:18:40 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 08:45, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 8:18:39 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 7/31/2017 5:45 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/31/2017 4:24 PM, wrote:
What,abt the nww bike performance ?


I find that new bike performance is limited by my old
legs. YMMV

... and lungs. And ticker. Plus, the fire in my belly is
largely gone.

The fire sometimes comes back, though. We (my wife and I,
riding tandem) were on a pretty leisurely club ride a
couple weeks ago. A new young guy had showed up, and we
were riding along chatting with him. He said he rides to
stay in shape for his other sports, etc.

As we talked, one of our club members who's notorious for
such behavior decided to hit high gear and crank away out
front for a while, then wait for the rest of the crew to
catch up. When he did that, the newbie suddenly ended our
conversation, saying something like "Excuse me now..." and
took off.

I though "Excuse me???" and told my wife "Let's go." So we
reeled him in and were a comfortable ten feet behind when
he caught the rabbit. For icing on the cake, our rabbit
guy (as he always does) left the leisurely riders for the
last five miles or so to crank in at 20 - 25 mph . My wife
and I were close behind, and the newbie was a distant
third. It was quite satisfying.

But with a tandem, terrain is everything. If it weren't
fairly flat, we'd happily ride back with the leisurely
crowd.

(P.S. Don't interpret this tale as a claim that I could
stick with Jay, Tom or Duane, let alone James.)

I'm old and slow. I wouldn't ride with you because you'd be
in the middle of the road. I'd keep saying, "hey Frank, get
over here. You're going to get whacked." You would scold me
for being a gutter bunny, although I don't ride on the fog
line and rarely ride anywhere with a gutter. We'd ride up on
Joerg who would have a pannier full of water, a couple CPUs
and a growler. He'd be complaining about psychopaths in cars
and the fact that his Gazelle didn't come with factory
rack-mounts and room for 35mm steel belted tires or a o-ring
chain. He'd have to stop every fifteen minutes to pee. I
don't think this NG would want to ride together.


Only one pee on a 4-5h ride. My PSA test came back 0.4ng/ml so
no "urge to go" from that department. However, I might bow out
of the r.b.t. peloton the millisecond I spot a brewpub. You son
would probably already be in the next county by then and leave
us old farts behind.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

My feeling on the matter is: Do NOT drink a 12-pack of beer the
nite before riding the 5 Miles of Hell trail in Utah.


No 12-packs from the store here, it's only our own brew. The good
stuff.

Depends where you buy your beer. My local store has an awesome
selection:
http://www.rainydayportland.com/2012...multnomah.html


Here is our Marco's Cafe, in the middle of this page:

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/gold-country-ca

Great place. Food is mediocre at best but good brews and good live
music. With dancing.


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every Portland
street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries You can get good
Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection but it's
adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it only matters during
rides. On some MTB rides far off civilization I take a home brew along.
Surpringly it stays very cool in a stainless double-wall thermos and the
constant shaking doesn't seem to harm it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or mead. Hell,
I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are also in
Portland. Where else?

Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.



I don't know. My boss just brought me a bottle of Elijah Craig 12 year
old small batch bourbon. They don't sell it in Quebec but she lives in
Ontario. Not sure what you mean by artisanal liquor but this stuff is
good. Makes me miss New Orleans where I can grab it at the Breaux Mart
along with my tasso and andouille.

I don't have the palate, and brown liquor tends to give me a headache. When the Scotch snobs convene, I zone out and leaf through Velo News. I follow beer a little bit because it is a big economic driver around here and basically a local pastime like Timbers' soccer or flogging Donald Trump. http://oregoncraftbeer.org/facts/

We do have a burgeoning craft distilling culture, but going to a single tasting would disable me for a week. I was getting some post-ski pizza with the family in Hood River and stumbled across a craft-ish distillery tasting room. It looked very inviting. http://www.drinkmemag.com/wp-content...-in-Oregon.jpg My wife looked at me and shook her head. Too far home on the Gorge in winter . . . at night.


Yep, Oregon is special, just like everyone else:
https://www.deathsdoorspirits.com/


Cool name, which from my experience is about half the battle. I'm going to this place and create my own brand. http://citrusdistillers.com/create-brand/create-vodka/

-- Jay Beattie.


Just saw a favorite pub of mine from New Orleans on Facebook touting
some Sour Orange beer. What's this world coming to?
  #133  
Old August 3rd 17, 01:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,033
Default New bike for Jay

OJ with seltzer n cut O slices

Refreshing
  #134  
Old August 3rd 17, 03:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default New bike for Jay

On 2017-08-02 12:30, wrote:
J, no diff tween alcohol n 'drugs'


You should live a few years in the Netherlands, then you know there is,
big time.

I never heard of anyone becoming hardcore addicted to alcohol after one
or two nights in the pub. Neither do they from cirgarettes. I takes a
long, long time and then of course the effect can be just as bad (death).

[...]


--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #135  
Old August 3rd 17, 03:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default New bike for Jay

On 2017-08-02 09:55, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 3:02:28 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 14:39, Doug Landau wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 1:18:40 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 08:45, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 8:18:39 PM UTC-7, Frank
Krygowski wrote:
On 7/31/2017 5:45 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/31/2017 4:24 PM, wrote:
What,abt the nww bike performance ?


I find that new bike performance is limited by my
old legs. YMMV

... and lungs. And ticker. Plus, the fire in my belly
is largely gone.

The fire sometimes comes back, though. We (my wife and
I, riding tandem) were on a pretty leisurely club ride
a couple weeks ago. A new young guy had showed up, and
we were riding along chatting with him. He said he
rides to stay in shape for his other sports, etc.

As we talked, one of our club members who's notorious
for such behavior decided to hit high gear and crank
away out front for a while, then wait for the rest of
the crew to catch up. When he did that, the newbie
suddenly ended our conversation, saying something like
"Excuse me now..." and took off.

I though "Excuse me???" and told my wife "Let's go." So
we reeled him in and were a comfortable ten feet behind
when he caught the rabbit. For icing on the cake, our
rabbit guy (as he always does) left the leisurely
riders for the last five miles or so to crank in at 20
- 25 mph . My wife and I were close behind, and the
newbie was a distant third. It was quite satisfying.

But with a tandem, terrain is everything. If it
weren't fairly flat, we'd happily ride back with the
leisurely crowd.

(P.S. Don't interpret this tale as a claim that I
could stick with Jay, Tom or Duane, let alone James.)

I'm old and slow. I wouldn't ride with you because you'd
be in the middle of the road. I'd keep saying, "hey
Frank, get over here. You're going to get whacked." You
would scold me for being a gutter bunny, although I don't
ride on the fog line and rarely ride anywhere with a
gutter. We'd ride up on Joerg who would have a pannier
full of water, a couple CPUs and a growler. He'd be
complaining about psychopaths in cars and the fact that
his Gazelle didn't come with factory rack-mounts and room
for 35mm steel belted tires or a o-ring chain. He'd have
to stop every fifteen minutes to pee. I don't think this
NG would want to ride together.


Only one pee on a 4-5h ride. My PSA test came back 0.4ng/ml
so no "urge to go" from that department. However, I might
bow out of the r.b.t. peloton the millisecond I spot a
brewpub. You son would probably already be in the next
county by then and leave us old farts behind.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

My feeling on the matter is: Do NOT drink a 12-pack of beer
the nite before riding the 5 Miles of Hell trail in Utah.


No 12-packs from the store here, it's only our own brew. The
good stuff.

Depends where you buy your beer. My local store has an awesome
selection:
http://www.rainydayportland.com/2012...multnomah.html




Here is our Marco's Cafe, in the middle of this page:

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/gold-country-ca

Great place. Food is mediocre at best but good brews and good live
music. With dancing.


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every Portland
street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries You can get
good Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection but
it's adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it only
matters during rides. On some MTB rides far off civilization I take
a home brew along. Surpringly it stays very cool in a stainless
double-wall thermos and the constant shaking doesn't seem to harm
it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or mead.
Hell, I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are also
in Portland. Where else?


Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.

Marcos is kind of a dump (but about the only place you could buy
espresso drinks 30-40 years ago in PDX). I was posting the picture
of the dumpy market down the street with the massive beer collection.
They have a zillion bottles and some really arcane stuff. Even the
store that is about a third of a mile from my house has a good beer
selection. There is a growler fill place across the street from that.
You have to like to home brew as a hobby because it is super-easy to
just walk down the street and buy a good beer. I have too many other
chores to spend time home brewing, but maybe I'll try it when I
retire.


Well, here in the People's Republic of California we have myriad
nonsensical rules such as no growler sales at any place that doesn't
brew right then and there. Then myriad taxes and "fees" (a.k.a. taxes)
which makes a growler fill cost $15-$20 instead of you $10 and the whole
picture turns pretty bleak. A growler with Belgian Tripel costs north of
$20 and I can make five gallons (which equals 10 growlers) for under $60.

Money or distance isn't the reason for me. For example, yesterday I rode
up to Placerville on singletrack and had a beer at a brewery, could have
brought back a growler. However, a growler with two people mweans you'll
be drinking the same beer all night. Also, I like to experimnent a bit
with the recipes so we have some beers now that you cannot buy anywhere.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #136  
Old August 3rd 17, 03:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default New bike for Jay

On 2017-08-02 13:14, Duane wrote:
On 02/08/2017 4:04 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 12:44:31 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/2/2017 1:51 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 10:00:13 AM UTC-7, Duane wrote:
On 02/08/2017 12:55 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 3:02:28 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 14:39, Doug Landau wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 1:18:40 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 08:45, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 8:18:39 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 7/31/2017 5:45 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/31/2017 4:24 PM, wrote:
What,abt the nww bike performance ?


I find that new bike performance is limited by my old
legs. YMMV

... and lungs. And ticker. Plus, the fire in my belly is
largely gone.

The fire sometimes comes back, though. We (my wife and I,
riding tandem) were on a pretty leisurely club ride a
couple weeks ago. A new young guy had showed up, and we
were riding along chatting with him. He said he rides to
stay in shape for his other sports, etc.

As we talked, one of our club members who's notorious for
such behavior decided to hit high gear and crank away out
front for a while, then wait for the rest of the crew to
catch up. When he did that, the newbie suddenly ended our
conversation, saying something like "Excuse me now..." and
took off.

I though "Excuse me???" and told my wife "Let's go." So we
reeled him in and were a comfortable ten feet behind when
he caught the rabbit. For icing on the cake, our rabbit
guy (as he always does) left the leisurely riders for the
last five miles or so to crank in at 20 - 25 mph . My wife
and I were close behind, and the newbie was a distant
third. It was quite satisfying.

But with a tandem, terrain is everything. If it weren't
fairly flat, we'd happily ride back with the leisurely
crowd.

(P.S. Don't interpret this tale as a claim that I could
stick with Jay, Tom or Duane, let alone James.)

I'm old and slow. I wouldn't ride with you because you'd be
in the middle of the road. I'd keep saying, "hey Frank, get
over here. You're going to get whacked." You would scold me
for being a gutter bunny, although I don't ride on the fog
line and rarely ride anywhere with a gutter. We'd ride up on
Joerg who would have a pannier full of water, a couple CPUs
and a growler. He'd be complaining about psychopaths in cars
and the fact that his Gazelle didn't come with factory
rack-mounts and room for 35mm steel belted tires or a o-ring
chain. He'd have to stop every fifteen minutes to pee. I
don't think this NG would want to ride together.


Only one pee on a 4-5h ride. My PSA test came back 0.4ng/ml so
no "urge to go" from that department. However, I might bow out
of the r.b.t. peloton the millisecond I spot a brewpub. You son
would probably already be in the next county by then and leave
us old farts behind.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

My feeling on the matter is: Do NOT drink a 12-pack of beer the
nite before riding the 5 Miles of Hell trail in Utah.


No 12-packs from the store here, it's only our own brew. The good
stuff.

Depends where you buy your beer. My local store has an awesome
selection:
http://www.rainydayportland.com/2012...multnomah.html



Here is our Marco's Cafe, in the middle of this page:

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/gold-country-ca

Great place. Food is mediocre at best but good brews and good live
music. With dancing.


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every Portland
street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries You can get
good
Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection but it's
adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it only matters
during
rides. On some MTB rides far off civilization I take a home brew
along.
Surpringly it stays very cool in a stainless double-wall thermos
and the
constant shaking doesn't seem to harm it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or mead.
Hell,
I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are
also in
Portland. Where else?

Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.



I don't know. My boss just brought me a bottle of Elijah Craig 12
year
old small batch bourbon. They don't sell it in Quebec but she
lives in
Ontario. Not sure what you mean by artisanal liquor but this stuff is
good. Makes me miss New Orleans where I can grab it at the Breaux Mart
along with my tasso and andouille.

I don't have the palate, and brown liquor tends to give me a
headache. When the Scotch snobs convene, I zone out and leaf through
Velo News. I follow beer a little bit because it is a big economic
driver around here and basically a local pastime like Timbers'
soccer or flogging Donald Trump. http://oregoncraftbeer.org/facts/

We do have a burgeoning craft distilling culture, but going to a
single tasting would disable me for a week. I was getting some
post-ski pizza with the family in Hood River and stumbled across a
craft-ish distillery tasting room. It looked very inviting.
http://www.drinkmemag.com/wp-content...-in-Oregon.jpg
My wife looked at me and shook her head. Too far home on the Gorge
in winter . . . at night.

Yep, Oregon is special, just like everyone else:
https://www.deathsdoorspirits.com/


Cool name, which from my experience is about half the battle. I'm
going to this place and create my own brand.
http://citrusdistillers.com/create-brand/create-vodka/

-- Jay Beattie.


Just saw a favorite pub of mine from New Orleans on Facebook touting
some Sour Orange beer. What's this world coming to?



Very normal these days. Here is the selection of beers including sours
from one of my cycling stops:

http://mrazbrewingcompany.com/beers/

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #137  
Old August 3rd 17, 06:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,595
Default New bike for Jay

On Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 7:46:59 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-02 09:55, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 3:02:28 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 14:39, Doug Landau wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 1:18:40 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 08:45, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, July 31, 2017 at 8:18:39 PM UTC-7, Frank
Krygowski wrote:
On 7/31/2017 5:45 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/31/2017 4:24 PM, wrote:
What,abt the nww bike performance ?


I find that new bike performance is limited by my
old legs. YMMV

... and lungs. And ticker. Plus, the fire in my belly
is largely gone.

The fire sometimes comes back, though. We (my wife and
I, riding tandem) were on a pretty leisurely club ride
a couple weeks ago. A new young guy had showed up, and
we were riding along chatting with him. He said he
rides to stay in shape for his other sports, etc.

As we talked, one of our club members who's notorious
for such behavior decided to hit high gear and crank
away out front for a while, then wait for the rest of
the crew to catch up. When he did that, the newbie
suddenly ended our conversation, saying something like
"Excuse me now..." and took off.

I though "Excuse me???" and told my wife "Let's go." So
we reeled him in and were a comfortable ten feet behind
when he caught the rabbit. For icing on the cake, our
rabbit guy (as he always does) left the leisurely
riders for the last five miles or so to crank in at 20
- 25 mph . My wife and I were close behind, and the
newbie was a distant third. It was quite satisfying.

But with a tandem, terrain is everything. If it
weren't fairly flat, we'd happily ride back with the
leisurely crowd.

(P.S. Don't interpret this tale as a claim that I
could stick with Jay, Tom or Duane, let alone James.)

I'm old and slow. I wouldn't ride with you because you'd
be in the middle of the road. I'd keep saying, "hey
Frank, get over here. You're going to get whacked." You
would scold me for being a gutter bunny, although I don't
ride on the fog line and rarely ride anywhere with a
gutter. We'd ride up on Joerg who would have a pannier
full of water, a couple CPUs and a growler. He'd be
complaining about psychopaths in cars and the fact that
his Gazelle didn't come with factory rack-mounts and room
for 35mm steel belted tires or a o-ring chain. He'd have
to stop every fifteen minutes to pee. I don't think this
NG would want to ride together.


Only one pee on a 4-5h ride. My PSA test came back 0.4ng/ml
so no "urge to go" from that department. However, I might
bow out of the r.b.t. peloton the millisecond I spot a
brewpub. You son would probably already be in the next
county by then and leave us old farts behind.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

My feeling on the matter is: Do NOT drink a 12-pack of beer
the nite before riding the 5 Miles of Hell trail in Utah.


No 12-packs from the store here, it's only our own brew. The
good stuff.

Depends where you buy your beer. My local store has an awesome
selection:
http://www.rainydayportland.com/2012...multnomah.html




Here is our Marco's Cafe, in the middle of this page:

http://www.gonewiththewynns.com/gold-country-ca

Great place. Food is mediocre at best but good brews and good live
music. With dancing.


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every Portland
street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries You can get
good Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection but
it's adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it only
matters during rides. On some MTB rides far off civilization I take
a home brew along. Surpringly it stays very cool in a stainless
double-wall thermos and the constant shaking doesn't seem to harm
it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or mead.
Hell, I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are also
in Portland. Where else?


Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.

Marcos is kind of a dump (but about the only place you could buy
espresso drinks 30-40 years ago in PDX). I was posting the picture
of the dumpy market down the street with the massive beer collection.
They have a zillion bottles and some really arcane stuff. Even the
store that is about a third of a mile from my house has a good beer
selection. There is a growler fill place across the street from that.
You have to like to home brew as a hobby because it is super-easy to
just walk down the street and buy a good beer. I have too many other
chores to spend time home brewing, but maybe I'll try it when I
retire.


Well, here in the People's Republic of California we have myriad
nonsensical rules such as no growler sales at any place that doesn't
brew right then and there. Then myriad taxes and "fees" (a.k.a. taxes)
which makes a growler fill cost $15-$20 instead of you $10 and the whole
picture turns pretty bleak. A growler with Belgian Tripel costs north of
$20 and I can make five gallons (which equals 10 growlers) for under $60.

Money or distance isn't the reason for me. For example, yesterday I rode
up to Placerville on singletrack and had a beer at a brewery, could have
brought back a growler. However, a growler with two people mweans you'll
be drinking the same beer all night. Also, I like to experimnent a bit
with the recipes so we have some beers now that you cannot buy anywhere.


Brewing your own means you'll have five gallons of the same beer, good or bad. Don't forget to factor-in the cost of bottles, your time and other capital costs.

To show you how mundane the beer craze is, here's the growler fill selection at my local supermarket (as opposed to market). It's walking distance, too, but a longer walk. http://growlers.fredmeyermedia.com/st/burlingame Fred Meyer is roughly the equivalent of a big Safeway or Lucky store. It's owned by Kroeger (Smith's in Utah).

BTW, Hop Venom is very good if you're into double-IPAs. https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/23066/72750/

-- Jay Beattie.
  #138  
Old August 3rd 17, 06:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default New bike for Jay

On 2017-08-03 10:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 7:46:59 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-02 09:55, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:


[...]


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every
Portland street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries
You can get good Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection
but it's adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it
only matters during rides. On some MTB rides far off
civilization I take a home brew along. Surpringly it stays very
cool in a stainless double-wall thermos and the constant
shaking doesn't seem to harm it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or
mead. Hell, I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are
also in Portland. Where else?

Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.

Marcos is kind of a dump (but about the only place you could buy
espresso drinks 30-40 years ago in PDX). I was posting the
picture of the dumpy market down the street with the massive beer
collection. They have a zillion bottles and some really arcane
stuff. Even the store that is about a third of a mile from my
house has a good beer selection. There is a growler fill place
across the street from that. You have to like to home brew as a
hobby because it is super-easy to just walk down the street and
buy a good beer. I have too many other chores to spend time home
brewing, but maybe I'll try it when I retire.


Well, here in the People's Republic of California we have myriad
nonsensical rules such as no growler sales at any place that
doesn't brew right then and there. Then myriad taxes and "fees"
(a.k.a. taxes) which makes a growler fill cost $15-$20 instead of
you $10 and the whole picture turns pretty bleak. A growler with
Belgian Tripel costs north of $20 and I can make five gallons
(which equals 10 growlers) for under $60.

Money or distance isn't the reason for me. For example, yesterday I
rode up to Placerville on singletrack and had a beer at a brewery,
could have brought back a growler. However, a growler with two
people mweans you'll be drinking the same beer all night. Also, I
like to experimnent a bit with the recipes so we have some beers
now that you cannot buy anywhere.


Brewing your own means you'll have five gallons of the same beer,
good or bad.



That's actually a good thing. You now have 52-55 12oz bottles of the
good stuff that tastes like fresh from tap even after sitting there for
a month or more. So far I didn't have a batch gone bad.

We usually have 6-8 kinds of beer available at all times. Once you get
started with brewing a mix develops that suits the family's taste.
Homebrew usually has a longer shelf-life that store-bought. We try new
beers all the time. Some become favorites, some don't but are ok. Then
there is "his and hers", she likes American Wheat brewed with some
clover honey while my favorite is Belgian Tripel.


... Don't forget to factor-in the cost of bottles, your time
and other capital costs.


Our bottles are all saved commercial ones. Can't factor in time, at
least not in terms of what I could otherwise make as an engineer. It is
a hobby. A good brew requires 4-6h total but that contains other
activities. In winter I brew in the man cave downstairs and while
watching the kettle out of the corner of an eye I either learn some
Spanish from TV or use the pool table. In summer I brew outside and do
yard maintenance in parallel. On hot days I wear my swim trunks and hop
into the swimming pool once in a while.


To show you how mundane the beer craze is, here's the growler fill
selection at my local supermarket (as opposed to market). It's
walking distance, too, but a longer walk.
http://growlers.fredmeyermedia.com/st/burlingame Fred Meyer is
roughly the equivalent of a big Safeway or Lucky store. It's owned by
Kroeger (Smith's in Utah).


Ooooh, Honey Koelsch! I've got to try brewing one of those. We always
have homemade Koelsch available, it is one of the staples here.

It's good that they offer 32oz fills, that's only two pints and you can
pick another for later. Anyhow, in California the goons would soon swoop
in and shut the whole place down.



BTW, Hop Venom is very good if you're into double-IPAs.
https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/23066/72750/


I love that stuff and 80 IBU would be right up my alley. My wife won't
drink it though.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #139  
Old August 3rd 17, 07:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,900
Default New bike for Jay

On 03/08/2017 1:46 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-03 10:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 7:46:59 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-02 09:55, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:


[...]


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every
Portland street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries
You can get good Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection
but it's adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it
only matters during rides. On some MTB rides far off
civilization I take a home brew along. Surpringly it stays very
cool in a stainless double-wall thermos and the constant
shaking doesn't seem to harm it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or
mead. Hell, I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are
also in Portland. Where else?

Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.

Marcos is kind of a dump (but about the only place you could buy
espresso drinks 30-40 years ago in PDX). I was posting the
picture of the dumpy market down the street with the massive beer
collection. They have a zillion bottles and some really arcane
stuff. Even the store that is about a third of a mile from my
house has a good beer selection. There is a growler fill place
across the street from that. You have to like to home brew as a
hobby because it is super-easy to just walk down the street and
buy a good beer. I have too many other chores to spend time home
brewing, but maybe I'll try it when I retire.


Well, here in the People's Republic of California we have myriad
nonsensical rules such as no growler sales at any place that
doesn't brew right then and there. Then myriad taxes and "fees"
(a.k.a. taxes) which makes a growler fill cost $15-$20 instead of
you $10 and the whole picture turns pretty bleak. A growler with
Belgian Tripel costs north of $20 and I can make five gallons
(which equals 10 growlers) for under $60.

Money or distance isn't the reason for me. For example, yesterday I
rode up to Placerville on singletrack and had a beer at a brewery,
could have brought back a growler. However, a growler with two
people mweans you'll be drinking the same beer all night. Also, I
like to experimnent a bit with the recipes so we have some beers
now that you cannot buy anywhere.


Brewing your own means you'll have five gallons of the same beer,
good or bad.



That's actually a good thing. You now have 52-55 12oz bottles of the
good stuff that tastes like fresh from tap even after sitting there for
a month or more. So far I didn't have a batch gone bad.

We usually have 6-8 kinds of beer available at all times. Once you get
started with brewing a mix develops that suits the family's taste.
Homebrew usually has a longer shelf-life that store-bought. We try new
beers all the time. Some become favorites, some don't but are ok. Then
there is "his and hers", she likes American Wheat brewed with some
clover honey while my favorite is Belgian Tripel.


... Don't forget to factor-in the cost of bottles, your time
and other capital costs.


Our bottles are all saved commercial ones. Can't factor in time, at
least not in terms of what I could otherwise make as an engineer. It is
a hobby. A good brew requires 4-6h total but that contains other
activities. In winter I brew in the man cave downstairs and while
watching the kettle out of the corner of an eye I either learn some
Spanish from TV or use the pool table. In summer I brew outside and do
yard maintenance in parallel. On hot days I wear my swim trunks and hop
into the swimming pool once in a while.


To show you how mundane the beer craze is, here's the growler fill
selection at my local supermarket (as opposed to market). It's
walking distance, too, but a longer walk.
http://growlers.fredmeyermedia.com/st/burlingame Fred Meyer is
roughly the equivalent of a big Safeway or Lucky store. It's owned by
Kroeger (Smith's in Utah).


Ooooh, Honey Koelsch! I've got to try brewing one of those. We always
have homemade Koelsch available, it is one of the staples here.

It's good that they offer 32oz fills, that's only two pints and you can
pick another for later. Anyhow, in California the goons would soon swoop
in and shut the whole place down.



BTW, Hop Venom is very good if you're into double-IPAs.
https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/23066/72750/


I love that stuff and 80 IBU would be right up my alley. My wife won't
drink it though.


Buying beer your wife won't drink sounds like a plan.
  #140  
Old August 3rd 17, 08:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,299
Default New bike for Jay

On 2017-08-03 11:51, Duane wrote:
On 03/08/2017 1:46 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-03 10:11, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 7:46:59 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-02 09:55, jbeattie wrote:
On Tuesday, August 1, 2017 at 5:13:47 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-01 16:46, jbeattie wrote:


[...]


Beer is passe. There's a brewpub or brewery on every
Portland street corner. http://www.portlandbeer.org/breweries
You can get good Oregon brewed bottled IPAs at Costco.


That is a major line-up. We don't have quite that selection
but it's adequate. However, since I started brewing my own it
only matters during rides. On some MTB rides far off
civilization I take a home brew along. Surpringly it stays very
cool in a stainless double-wall thermos and the constant
shaking doesn't seem to harm it much.


Now it's about cannabis -- and maybe hard cider . . . or
mead. Hell, I don't know. No, no . . . its artisanal booze:
http://www.distilleryrowpdx.com/


Try their Hopka:

http://www.indiospirits.com/

Good stuff, just don't ride after too many of those. There are
also in Portland. Where else?

Hops liqueur? Blecchhhh. I'm not an atisanal liquor fan.

Marcos is kind of a dump (but about the only place you could buy
espresso drinks 30-40 years ago in PDX). I was posting the
picture of the dumpy market down the street with the massive beer
collection. They have a zillion bottles and some really arcane
stuff. Even the store that is about a third of a mile from my
house has a good beer selection. There is a growler fill place
across the street from that. You have to like to home brew as a
hobby because it is super-easy to just walk down the street and
buy a good beer. I have too many other chores to spend time home
brewing, but maybe I'll try it when I retire.


Well, here in the People's Republic of California we have myriad
nonsensical rules such as no growler sales at any place that
doesn't brew right then and there. Then myriad taxes and "fees"
(a.k.a. taxes) which makes a growler fill cost $15-$20 instead of
you $10 and the whole picture turns pretty bleak. A growler with
Belgian Tripel costs north of $20 and I can make five gallons
(which equals 10 growlers) for under $60.

Money or distance isn't the reason for me. For example, yesterday I
rode up to Placerville on singletrack and had a beer at a brewery,
could have brought back a growler. However, a growler with two
people mweans you'll be drinking the same beer all night. Also, I
like to experimnent a bit with the recipes so we have some beers
now that you cannot buy anywhere.

Brewing your own means you'll have five gallons of the same beer,
good or bad.



That's actually a good thing. You now have 52-55 12oz bottles of the
good stuff that tastes like fresh from tap even after sitting there
for a month or more. So far I didn't have a batch gone bad.

We usually have 6-8 kinds of beer available at all times. Once you get
started with brewing a mix develops that suits the family's taste.
Homebrew usually has a longer shelf-life that store-bought. We try new
beers all the time. Some become favorites, some don't but are ok. Then
there is "his and hers", she likes American Wheat brewed with some
clover honey while my favorite is Belgian Tripel.


... Don't forget to factor-in the cost of bottles, your time
and other capital costs.


Our bottles are all saved commercial ones. Can't factor in time, at
least not in terms of what I could otherwise make as an engineer. It
is a hobby. A good brew requires 4-6h total but that contains other
activities. In winter I brew in the man cave downstairs and while
watching the kettle out of the corner of an eye I either learn some
Spanish from TV or use the pool table. In summer I brew outside and do
yard maintenance in parallel. On hot days I wear my swim trunks and
hop into the swimming pool once in a while.


To show you how mundane the beer craze is, here's the growler fill
selection at my local supermarket (as opposed to market). It's
walking distance, too, but a longer walk.
http://growlers.fredmeyermedia.com/st/burlingame Fred Meyer is
roughly the equivalent of a big Safeway or Lucky store. It's owned by
Kroeger (Smith's in Utah).


Ooooh, Honey Koelsch! I've got to try brewing one of those. We always
have homemade Koelsch available, it is one of the staples here.

It's good that they offer 32oz fills, that's only two pints and you
can pick another for later. Anyhow, in California the goons would soon
swoop in and shut the whole place down.



BTW, Hop Venom is very good if you're into double-IPAs.
https://www.beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/23066/72750/


I love that stuff and 80 IBU would be right up my alley. My wife won't
drink it though.


Buying beer your wife won't drink sounds like a plan.



Doesn't work. Then she starts sipping at _my_ Belgian Tripel :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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