A Cycling & bikes forum. CycleBanter.com

Go Back   Home » CycleBanter.com forum » rec.bicycles » Techniques
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #81  
Old February 16th 20, 08:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,278
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On 2/16/2020 9:47 AM, wrote:
On Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 3:30:09 PM UTC+1, Ted Heise wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 17:10:55 -0800 (PST),
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Saturday, February 15, 2020 at 5:37:50 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 14:01:55 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:

I have a friend who's a skilled and enthusiastic
calligrapher. It's amazing what some people can do.

When I was going to grade school "proper" "penmanship" was
still not unknown and I had one teacher what wrote the most
beautiful penmanship, "Spencerian" I think it was known as,
that when she wrote a note to your parents, "John must try
harder", you wanted to frame it to hang on the wall. :-)

A lost art.


My previous boss does the most wonderful calligraphy you ever will
see. I still get lovely Christmas cards from her.


OTOH, I was the student to whom they gave a special pencil, one
that would guide my fingers into the right configuration. They
hoped it would help. It didn't.


Two-words: Zaner-Bloser. I had a grade school teacher who made me
use one of their pens. Ugh. Didn't help. The notion of moving
my whole arm was entirely foreign, and only made matters worse.

Ever since high school, I've written everything (except my
signature) in upper case block letters. When I write with care,
it looks almost as good as a draftsman's work. When I'm hasty,
it's still mostly legible.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA


An old colleague wrote his research reports always by hand in upper case block letters with a pencil. He had a beautiful handwriting. When he retired we gave him a font of his own handwriting for his computer.


That's an excellent idea!


--
- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #82  
Old February 16th 20, 09:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,920
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 14:54:18 -0800 (PST), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:
On Thursday, 13 February 2020 17:15:52 UTC-5, Tim McNamara wrote:

32 years ago, after a terrible winter in my old mini pickup, I bought
a Ford Bronco II and took delivery on Halloween, which it turned out
was appropriate for that vehicle. Never buying another Ford (the
heads cracked, the transmission bits and bobs disintegrated, etc.).
First time I drove it on icy conditions I came up to the corner,
stepped on the brake to turn and sailed right on through. That let
me know that it accelerated better but didn't stop or turn any
better. Cost me a bent rim since the opposite curb stopped me...


Ford = Fix Or Repair Dialy or Found On Road Dead.


Man, my old Bronco II sure lived up to that. I had been under the
mistaken belief that they did trucks better than cars but no. Now,
despite my grousing I bought that vehicle 10/31/1988 and kept it until I
replaced it- funnily enough- on 10/31/2001. 13 years and finally I had
road rage just getting into it, before even starting it. I was dumb,
it's not a long story.

The final straw occurred a week or two earlier- my wife and I had been
out for a bike ride with friends and were on the way home. She was
expressing some disapprobation about the Bronco II (which she hated and
that may have motivated me to keep it out of sheer stubbornness). I
replied defensively that sure, it had been through some problems but
other than that had been fairly reliable. About two minutes later it
ceased running and wouldn't restart. Had to be towed. Uh huh. That
was it. My wife struggled to say nothing, succeeded but with her
silence said everything. Donated for parts. What a pile of junk.
  #83  
Old February 16th 20, 09:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,920
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Thu, 13 Feb 2020 16:58:40 -0600, AMuzi wrote:

applied Newtonian physics refresher course:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6pNqCUNffI


LOL. A few of those may have required cleaning the upholstery
afterwards.
  #84  
Old February 17th 20, 03:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Saturday, February 15, 2020 at 6:56:18 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/15/2020 8:24 AM, Ted Heise wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 14:49:53 -0600,
AMuzi wrote:
On 2/14/2020 2:26 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/14/2020 1:29 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/14/2020 11:17 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:


Separate question: Andrew, on my bike, the logos were hand
lettered, not decals. Do you do that in your shop?

We do not ourselves. We hire it out to an artist; not cheap,
it's highly skilled labor.

Who did yours? Did you do it yourself?

I never attempted it. I did trace the original, hoping to try
it someday, but it's 30 years later and I haven't gotten
around to it!

Vaguely related: For a few years, I've been nibbling away at a
weird project, a "reflecting ceiling sundial." I'm at the
point where I need to paint a complicated set of overlapping
analemma curves on my ceiling.

If I had a skilled pinstripe artist or sign painter who could
work in an anti-gravity field, I'd hire him. But pinstriping
brushes and rollers don't seem to work well upside down. I'm
forced to double-mask dozens of these curves. It's terribly
tedious.

I asked because I couldn't think of a frame with hand painted
graphics. I still can't recall one.


The Waterford I bought back in 1998 had my name (in cursive)
painted on it. I had assumed that was hand painted, but maybe it
was not?

In a thread tie (or maybe it was somewhere else in this thread?),
I bought the Waterford because I was envious of my buddy's classic
Paramount, and it seemed the closest I could come to it.


Waterford script (and block) graphics are dry mount film
transfers:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/wfdrs33.jpg

I know the guy who screens them.

Regarding Frank's Raleigh, these are actual 45 year old
solvent mount graphics (hence a bit yellowed) recently applied:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...ast/rsc18q.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I bought a set for my Basso and they were absolutely perfect. Then I decided to clear coat them so that they wouldn't wear off like they do on Pinaellos. That was a very bad idea because it was far too cold that the clear wouldn't dry rapidly enough and it floated the decals and dried with rippled coat. Takeaway is to only do things like that in warm weather or under heat lamps like the pros do.
  #85  
Old February 17th 20, 06:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,636
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 2:47:12 PM UTC, wrote:
On Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 3:30:09 PM UTC+1, Ted Heise wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 17:10:55 -0800 (PST),
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Saturday, February 15, 2020 at 5:37:50 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 14:01:55 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:

I have a friend who's a skilled and enthusiastic
calligrapher. It's amazing what some people can do.

When I was going to grade school "proper" "penmanship" was
still not unknown and I had one teacher what wrote the most
beautiful penmanship, "Spencerian" I think it was known as,
that when she wrote a note to your parents, "John must try
harder", you wanted to frame it to hang on the wall. :-)

A lost art.


My previous boss does the most wonderful calligraphy you ever will
see. I still get lovely Christmas cards from her.


OTOH, I was the student to whom they gave a special pencil, one
that would guide my fingers into the right configuration. They
hoped it would help. It didn't.


Two-words: Zaner-Bloser. I had a grade school teacher who made me
use one of their pens. Ugh. Didn't help. The notion of moving
my whole arm was entirely foreign, and only made matters worse.

Ever since high school, I've written everything (except my
signature) in upper case block letters. When I write with care,
it looks almost as good as a draftsman's work. When I'm hasty,
it's still mostly legible.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA


An old colleague wrote his research reports always by hand in upper case block letters with a pencil. He had a beautiful handwriting. When he retired we gave him a font of his own handwriting for his computer.

Lou


In my ad agency, just about the time crude computer setting came in (you sent out for it because this was a dozen years or so before desktop computers came in) we had an old chappie who could handletter any font perfectly down to 10pt. Display text (headlines) he painted with a brush and they always looked better than the computer set text because in those days computer kerning (spacing letters to fit better together rather than evenly) was either crude or non-existent. In addition, he taught the new intakes of "designers" straight out of inadequate graphic design colleges how to draw a perfect hairline with a brush with a single hair in it. He was some unimaginable age to us youngsters, but we were lucky he didn't want to retire.

Andre Jute
Now let us praise the humility of useful men -- adapted from Ecclesiastes
  #86  
Old February 17th 20, 06:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 188
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Monday, February 17, 2020 at 9:29:04 AM UTC-8, Andre Jute wrote:
On Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 2:47:12 PM UTC, wrote:
On Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 3:30:09 PM UTC+1, Ted Heise wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 17:10:55 -0800 (PST),
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Saturday, February 15, 2020 at 5:37:50 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 14:01:55 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:

I have a friend who's a skilled and enthusiastic
calligrapher. It's amazing what some people can do.

When I was going to grade school "proper" "penmanship" was
still not unknown and I had one teacher what wrote the most
beautiful penmanship, "Spencerian" I think it was known as,
that when she wrote a note to your parents, "John must try
harder", you wanted to frame it to hang on the wall. :-)

A lost art.

My previous boss does the most wonderful calligraphy you ever will
see. I still get lovely Christmas cards from her.


OTOH, I was the student to whom they gave a special pencil, one
that would guide my fingers into the right configuration. They
hoped it would help. It didn't.

Two-words: Zaner-Bloser. I had a grade school teacher who made me
use one of their pens. Ugh. Didn't help. The notion of moving
my whole arm was entirely foreign, and only made matters worse.

Ever since high school, I've written everything (except my
signature) in upper case block letters. When I write with care,
it looks almost as good as a draftsman's work. When I'm hasty,
it's still mostly legible.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA


An old colleague wrote his research reports always by hand in upper case block letters with a pencil. He had a beautiful handwriting. When he retired we gave him a font of his own handwriting for his computer.

Lou


In my ad agency, just about the time crude computer setting came in (you sent out for it because this was a dozen years or so before desktop computers came in) we had an old chappie who could handletter any font perfectly down to 10pt. Display text (headlines) he painted with a brush and they always looked better than the computer set text because in those days computer kerning (spacing letters to fit better together rather than evenly) was either crude or non-existent. In addition, he taught the new intakes of "designers" straight out of inadequate graphic design colleges how to draw a perfect hairline with a brush with a single hair in it. He was some unimaginable age to us youngsters, but we were lucky he didn't want to retire.

Andre Jute
Now let us praise the humility of useful men -- adapted from Ecclesiastes


Those absolutely perfectly lettered and perfectly reproduced names and other insignia on older bikes were all hand done by people. Seeing artists at work is what made it clear to me that I would NEVER be an artist.
  #87  
Old February 17th 20, 06:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,636
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Sunday, February 16, 2020 at 4:23:53 PM UTC, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/15/2020 7:10 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Saturday, February 15, 2020 at 5:37:50 PM UTC-5, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 15 Feb 2020 14:01:55 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:

I have a friend who's a skilled and enthusiastic calligrapher. It's
amazing what some people can do.

When I was going to grade school "proper" "penmanship" was still not
unknown and I had one teacher what wrote the most beautiful
penmanship, "Spencerian" I think it was known as, that when she wrote
a note to your parents, "John must try harder", you wanted to frame it
to hang on the wall. :-)

A lost art.


Another cycling friend of mine is a retired teacher. Her penmanship is immaculate,
and precisely the same style they tried to teach me in 3rd grade.

OTOH, I was the student to whom they gave a special pencil, one that would guide
my fingers into the right configuration. They hoped it would help. It didn't.

- Frank Krygowski




Regular and repeated raps on the knuckles with an 18" wood
rule didn't work either.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


My art teacher said, "You're no doubt a genius, Andre, but you'd better not choose the calligraphy section of the examination." Years later I was reminded of it when my mother returned a handwritten letter from me with a request to typewrite it -- and all future letters.

My over-esteem of the legibility of my handwriting -- if people would only close their eyes to s slit and view it from at least three feet away under a strong lamp -- was restored by Apple's Newton, a now forgotten early tablet with handwriting recognition built in, and a special script for those who wanted to learn it. I didn't. I would go to a concert and sit in he dark and in my normal handwriting would write my review on the Newton's screen one large word after another as the concert progressed. The Newton, a work of genius, never missed a word, not even the spelling of Slav names; immediately after the concert I'd modem it through to my paper without even reading it again and be the darling of the copy-editors for not causing extra work when the midnight deadline pressed. See, I used to say to people who complained about my handwriting, the Newton is smarter than you are. I used that Newton* for umpteen years after Apple stopped making it, until the iPad appeared. The iPad was larger and not as good (in the beginning anyway); Apple had given up on handwriting recognition in favour of dictation, which of course a reviewer cannot do while the concert is on.

Andre Jute
*Which was a gift from one of my son's friends after he "upgraded" to a Palm, so the Newton may even have been obsolete by the time I started using it.. Another Apple product I kept using long, long after it was obsolete -- in fact paying a premium for the last few NOS that a dealer had in stock as spares for my studio -- was the "multimedia" 840AV on which we made umpteen music videos.
  #88  
Old February 17th 20, 07:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,636
Default OT. Anything BICYCLING related going on here? LOL

On Monday, February 17, 2020 at 2:36:06 PM UTC, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, February 15, 2020 at 6:56:18 AM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/15/2020 8:24 AM, Ted Heise wrote:
On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 14:49:53 -0600,
AMuzi wrote:
On 2/14/2020 2:26 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 2/14/2020 1:29 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 2/14/2020 11:17 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:

Separate question: Andrew, on my bike, the logos were hand
lettered, not decals. Do you do that in your shop?

We do not ourselves. We hire it out to an artist; not cheap,
it's highly skilled labor.

Who did yours? Did you do it yourself?

I never attempted it. I did trace the original, hoping to try
it someday, but it's 30 years later and I haven't gotten
around to it!

Vaguely related: For a few years, I've been nibbling away at a
weird project, a "reflecting ceiling sundial." I'm at the
point where I need to paint a complicated set of overlapping
analemma curves on my ceiling.

If I had a skilled pinstripe artist or sign painter who could
work in an anti-gravity field, I'd hire him. But pinstriping
brushes and rollers don't seem to work well upside down. I'm
forced to double-mask dozens of these curves. It's terribly
tedious.

I asked because I couldn't think of a frame with hand painted
graphics. I still can't recall one.

The Waterford I bought back in 1998 had my name (in cursive)
painted on it. I had assumed that was hand painted, but maybe it
was not?

In a thread tie (or maybe it was somewhere else in this thread?),
I bought the Waterford because I was envious of my buddy's classic
Paramount, and it seemed the closest I could come to it.


Waterford script (and block) graphics are dry mount film
transfers:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/wfdrs33.jpg

I know the guy who screens them.

Regarding Frank's Raleigh, these are actual 45 year old
solvent mount graphics (hence a bit yellowed) recently applied:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...ast/rsc18q.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I bought a set for my Basso and they were absolutely perfect. Then I decided to clear coat them so that they wouldn't wear off like they do on Pinaellos. That was a very bad idea because it was far too cold that the clear wouldn't dry rapidly enough and it floated the decals and dried with rippled coat. Takeaway is to only do things like that in warm weather or under heat lamps like the pros do.


I have the name Kranich handlettered on my Utopia bike, and the gold coachlines too, by the craftsman who worked not he assembly line in 1936 when the distant ancestor of my bike was first built by the Locomotive company. His name is Meester Henk Kluwer and a few years ago Volkswagen chose him as the greatest living craftsman in Europe. Scroll down in this PDF to the headline "A proper gentleman’s bicycle of course has gold coachlining by the original craftsman!" where he is pictured at work:
http://coolmainpress.com/AndreJute'sUtopiaKranich.pdf

In the winter I spray varnish on paintings in a heated room in the loft used for nothing else, but it is hell to get a bike up there. Once, without me noticing it, a spider settled on one of about a dozen paintings I had laid out and was varnishing together. I didn't see it for six months while the varnish set, and then it was too late to remove the spider, which had been varnished over, without leaving a hole in the varnish. The painting's owner is under the distinct impression that I planned for the 3D spider to be part of his painting. After that, in the summer when I varnish outside, I no longer pick leaves and other small items borne on the wind out of the varnish... I like the happenstances of watercolours but to my regret it happens less often in oils.

Andre Jute
You may call me Mr Serendipity
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bicycling related I guess acalcium Australia 0 May 29th 05 05:54 AM
Cycling related Bill C Racing 1 April 17th 05 02:20 AM
My first SPD related fall saveacup UK 18 January 8th 05 11:05 AM
chain related? dreaded General 3 September 17th 04 03:53 AM
chain related? dreaded Techniques 4 September 13th 04 05:07 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2020 CycleBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.