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Heine on inflation



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 10th 16, 02:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Default Heine on inflation

https://janheine.wordpress.com/

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

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  #2  
Old March 10th 16, 02:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Heine on inflation

On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 8:03:29 AM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com/

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


super !

reinventing the belted auto tire...

measuring vibrations ? forward backwards downwards or upwards ?

in Latvian or Basque ?

claiming 'vibrations' counter forward motions/pavement irregularities

that multiple irregularities n those depths encountered wit soft pressures are faster than not encounted with higher pressure ...

because h pressure 'vibrations' equalize the depth impacts.

lower pressure vibrations are absorbed but do not lose heat, heat is stored for more forward movement in the softer rubber ? best call Jeffo

...........

is this real or science jello ?

  #3  
Old March 10th 16, 03:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Default Heine on inflation

On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 5:53:42 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 8:03:29 AM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com/

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


super !

reinventing the belted auto tire...

measuring vibrations ? forward backwards downwards or upwards ?

in Latvian or Basque ?

claiming 'vibrations' counter forward motions/pavement irregularities

that multiple irregularities n those depths encountered wit soft pressures are faster than not encounted with higher pressure ...

because h pressure 'vibrations' equalize the depth impacts.

lower pressure vibrations are absorbed but do not lose heat, heat is stored for more forward movement in the softer rubber ? best call Jeffo

..........

is this real or science jello ?


I like the pictures.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #4  
Old March 10th 16, 05:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default Heine on inflation

On 3/10/2016 9:53 AM, jbeattie wrote:


I like the pictures.


In the next post down the page, the photo with the Bald Eagle is pretty
amazing!


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old March 10th 16, 05:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Heine on inflation

On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 8:53:06 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:
I like the pictures.

-- Jay Beattie.


Yes for scenery they are nice pictures. But the people in the pictures were odd.

First picture you have a group of riders. Some wearing that evil lycra fabric. Racing jerseys. And one guy wearing jeans with a belt? Who rides in jeans and a belt? Oddly everyone was wearing a helmet. I thought this Heine guy was one of the free love, peace, anti nuclear, anti helmet people.

And a picture below you have two guys with Grizzly Adams beards and handlebar bags bigger than suitcases. Were they going on a week long ride and needed to carry all their gear?

And a few pictures lower we have two riders on the road and the bald eagle in front of them. And one of the riders is on the wrong side of the double yellow line. I know the people on this forum advocate taking the lane and riding as far from the edge of the road as possible. But to actually cross the yellow line and ride in the oncoming traffic lane? Apparently they have different rules of the road in Seattle.
  #6  
Old March 10th 16, 05:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Default Heine on inflation

On 3/10/2016 10:35 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 8:53:06 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:
I like the pictures.

-- Jay Beattie.


Yes for scenery they are nice pictures. But the people in the pictures were odd.

First picture you have a group of riders. Some wearing that evil lycra fabric. Racing jerseys. And one guy wearing jeans with a belt? Who rides in jeans and a belt? Oddly everyone was wearing a helmet. I thought this Heine guy was one of the free love, peace, anti nuclear, anti helmet people.

And a picture below you have two guys with Grizzly Adams beards and handlebar bags bigger than suitcases. Were they going on a week long ride and needed to carry all their gear?

And a few pictures lower we have two riders on the road and the bald eagle in front of them. And one of the riders is on the wrong side of the double yellow line. I know the people on this forum advocate taking the lane and riding as far from the edge of the road as possible. But to actually cross the yellow line and ride in the oncoming traffic lane? Apparently they have different rules of the road in Seattle.


Sorta describes 'American cyclists'. Not all certainly but a
good mix.

I am bewildered when confronted with "all you cyclists..."
as if we can be generalized. Sheesh.

Me?
Lycra sometimes, usually not
Slacks without a belt fall off me.
Helmet no, but you go right ahead if you like
Free love once maybe not so much at my age
Peace through strength works unless the other guy is
stronger. Ask the enslaved Tibetans how that goes.
I'm big on nuclear power and nuclear weapons but not so much
on electric bicycles.

See how hard it is to lump cyclists in any given group?

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #7  
Old March 10th 16, 06:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Default Heine on inflation

On 3/10/2016 5:03 AM, AMuzi wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com/


Good article, it dispels the myth that tire pressure doesn't matter and
that the sidewall will support the tire regardless of the pressure.

What is not really true, in many cases, is that the reduced rolling
resistance of higher pressure tires is offset by vibration losses. If
the bicycle has suspension, then these vibration losses are not present.
And of course on smooth roads, the vibration losses are minimal even
without suspension.

For example, my Dahon and my Bromptons both have suspension to reduce
vibration transmitted to the rider, an especially important feature on
smaller-wheeled bicycles. A great many hybrids and sport touring bikes
also have some sort of suspension, a suspension fork and/or a suspension
seat post, and of course nearly every mountain bike sold these days has
suspension.


  #8  
Old March 10th 16, 06:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,392
Default Heine on inflation

On 3/10/2016 11:35 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, March 10, 2016 at 8:53:06 AM UTC-6, jbeattie wrote:
I like the pictures.

-- Jay Beattie.


Yes for scenery they are nice pictures. But the people in the pictures were odd.

First picture you have a group of riders. Some wearing that evil lycra fabric. Racing jerseys. And one guy wearing jeans with a belt? Who rides in jeans and a belt?

Well, there are different types of cyclists. IME, most cycling
enthusiasts don't mind riding with folks that lack the "full mating
plumage." (The exceptions are some of the racing clubs.)

I don't think those pants are blue jeans. They're probably the
knickers sold by Heine's company:
https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/co...knickers-2016/

Oddly everyone was wearing a helmet. I thought this Heine guy was one of the free love, peace, anti nuclear, anti helmet people.


Well, here's his blog post on the Helmet Wars:
https://janheine.wordpress.com/2014/...ing-the-point/

He's not unlike many Americans who were former True Believers, but then
began looking deeper into the issue and relevant data.

A) He now thinks helmets are greatly oversold, and certainly not worth
mandating.

B) He still wears one almost all the time.

This is common, to a degree that amazes me. It's not at all uncommon to
have people argue vociferously against helmets, but say something like
"But I still wear one every time I ride." In some cases, they append a
statement like "... but only to prevent minor bumps."

In Jan Heine's case, the magazine shows him wearing a helmet in every
riding photo taken in North America. But in the photos of his riding in
Europe or Japan, he's usually bareheaded or in a cotton cycling cap,
especially if he's riding with locals.

Unlike Mr. Scharf, I don't think that North America is above some danger
threshold that makes a helmet necessary. I think that the helmet
propaganda campaign first took hold among bike club people, and they've
repeated the "helmet = safety" mantra so often that they can't ditch the
concept. And because of that, there's significant social pressure to
keep that hat as part of the uniform. Those showing up without a helmet
may have to spend their ride justifying their decision against
unpleasant arguments.

And a picture below you have two guys with Grizzly Adams beards and handlebar bags bigger than suitcases. Were they going on a week long ride and needed to carry all their gear?


I'm not sure. Some of the magazine's articles have featured long rides
into remote areas, including spartan campouts. Others have featured
speed competitions between bikes intended for delivery work. (!)

Personally, I don't ride with a handlebar bag that size. Mine's only
about half that size, so I supplement it with a huge Carradice
saddlebag. :-)
http://www.carradice.co.uk/index.php...roduct_id=4 3

And a few pictures lower we have two riders on the road and the bald eagle in front of them. And one of the riders is on the wrong side of the double yellow line. I know the people on this forum advocate taking the lane and riding as far from the edge of the road as possible. But to actually cross the yellow line and ride in the oncoming traffic lane? Apparently they have different rules of the road in Seattle.


The caption states that they came upon the eagle sitting at the
roadside. I assume they moved left to avoid a possible collision. The
road ahead is clear; and contrary to popular belief, it is legal to
cross a yellow line to avoid a hazard, as long as it can be done safely.
In my state (and some others) motorists are specifically permitted to
cross a yellow line to pass a slow cyclist or other slow vehicle.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #9  
Old March 10th 16, 09:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default Heine on inflation

Frank ok Frank fessup, how are you reading Heine's conclusion ?
  #10  
Old March 10th 16, 09:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 4,609
Default Heine on inflation

On 2016-03-10 09:08, sms wrote:
On 3/10/2016 5:03 AM, AMuzi wrote:
https://janheine.wordpress.com/


Good article, it dispels the myth that tire pressure doesn't matter and
that the sidewall will support the tire regardless of the pressure.


However, there is stuff in there that I disagree with.


What is not really true, in many cases, is that the reduced rolling
resistance of higher pressure tires is offset by vibration losses. If
the bicycle has suspension, then these vibration losses are not present.



Not really. My full suspension MTB vibrates like crazy on some sections
of trail. This is because you have to run with fairly high pressure in
the shocks for the other more gnarly secitions so you won't bottom out.


And of course on smooth roads, the vibration losses are minimal even
without suspension.

For example, my Dahon and my Bromptons both have suspension to reduce
vibration transmitted to the rider, an especially important feature on
smaller-wheeled bicycles. A great many hybrids and sport touring bikes
also have some sort of suspension, a suspension fork and/or a suspension
seat post, and of course nearly every mountain bike sold these days has
suspension.


This is the kind of vibration I have on just about every MTB ride (movie
is by another rider but same area):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l5cjAW_nrl4

It can be so bad that after an hour of this the wrists hurt a bit at
night. Something considered "normal" by local MTB riders. It is also a
good test for newly designed electronics which I have strapped to the
bike for that purpose.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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