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  #61  
Old September 8th 17, 02:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,356
Default Taya Chain

On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:39:17 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:59:50 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.

Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
After how many decades of ****ing off customers because the plastic teeth stripped off of the gears after 40K miles?


http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums.../t-335969.html
http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vi...-identify.html
https://classicoldsmobile.com/forums...placement.html
http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Engine/chains.htm
Ads
  #62  
Old September 8th 17, 03:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,653
Default Taya Chain

On 9/7/2017 8:58 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:39:17 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:59:50 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.

Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
After how many decades of ****ing off customers because the plastic teeth stripped off of the gears after 40K miles?


http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums.../t-335969.html
http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vi...-identify.html
https://classicoldsmobile.com/forums...placement.html
http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Engine/chains.htm


The GM V8 Delrin coat cam gear teeth do run quieter but do
indeed fail before a steel/steel set would. In my case about
80K miles. Replacement chain and gear set plus gaskets is
all relatively cheap. The exchange may be done in the car by
slacking the motor mounts and lifting the block a couple of
inches. Worst part of it is the timing cover to oil pan
joint. All in, about 3 hours- and that's out of doors
without prior experience of that particular job. i.e.,
serious but not overly daunting.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #63  
Old September 8th 17, 07:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,356
Default Taya Chain

On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:21:56 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/7/2017 8:58 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:39:17 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:59:50 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.

Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
After how many decades of ****ing off customers because the plastic teeth stripped off of the gears after 40K miles?


http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums.../t-335969.html
http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vi...-identify.html
https://classicoldsmobile.com/forums...placement.html
http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Engine/chains.htm


The GM V8 Delrin coat cam gear teeth do run quieter but do
indeed fail before a steel/steel set would. In my case about
80K miles. Replacement chain and gear set plus gaskets is
all relatively cheap. The exchange may be done in the car by
slacking the motor mounts and lifting the block a couple of
inches. Worst part of it is the timing cover to oil pan
joint. All in, about 3 hours- and that's out of doors
without prior experience of that particular job. i.e.,
serious but not overly daunting.


Yeah, I did it on the 85 chevy van I bought recently and it was much easier than on a dodge. Actually I think I was supposed to loosen the motor mounts but did not. But on a chrysler at least a smallblock you have to remove the intake too as it overlaps on top.

Worst part of it was that they failed after the warranty expired.
  #64  
Old September 8th 17, 04:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Taya Chain

On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:39:17 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:59:50 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.

Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
After how many decades of ****ing off customers because the plastic teeth stripped off of the gears after 40K miles?


The smaller Ford V6 uses rubber timing belts and they insist that you absolutely MUST replace them on 50,000 mile intervals or bye-bye motor. GMC apparently has a V8 that way. My stepdaughter's SUV broke a belt and exploded the motor - the mechanic told her not to replace the motor because the new one would do exactly the same thing.

My Ford has the larger V6 with a steel timing belt and they go just short of forever. These cars are advertised 5 years old and with 200,000 miles on them. People actually commute from Sacramento to San Francisco!

Here's one with almost 250,000 miles on it:
https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/cto...266166468.html

In the '60's you'd be LUCKY to get a motor to last 100,000 miles.
  #65  
Old September 8th 17, 04:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Taya Chain

On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:40:37 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 8:26:26 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 5:25:33 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I had in my
garage that I must have purchased five to ten years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for 6,7,8
gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the first time I've
used a chain with a connecting link since childhood. I looked up Taya
and it's a big Taiwanese chain manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike which I bought
from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old sticker price (the
sticker had already turned brownish). No link, mounted with hammer and
anvil as usual. To my utter amazement it doesn't show any measurable
stretch after over 2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on
because of our hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival
that. I am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the bike
was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening process was
not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today except for possibly
Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology is
kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into the dust
bin. Well, usually.

Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily. Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.

In this case, the non-hardened chains make less noise, 'cuz the edges go 'ting' less, and consumers perceive this as better shifting. ;-)


Doug, some woman came around the corner, dropped her water bottle (so she says while clutching her smartphone to her breast) fished around for it and ran into the back of my parked car turning it into a pile of scrape metal and plastic. Looking for replacements I find 5 year old cars with 200,000 miles on the original motors and not only said to be running smoothly but still getting good mileage. That isn't being done with plastic gears. I picked up a 2007 with 50,000 miles on it and expect it to last my lifetime with only normal maintenance.


I'm talking about the automotive scene in the 1970s, Tom.


Doug, what cars used plastic gears in the '70's? Perhaps there were but at that time I was buying pretty good cars like Mustangs and Camaros with big engines in them. Not to drive fast so much as to get on the freeway ahead of people purposely trying to cut you off.
  #66  
Old September 8th 17, 04:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Taya Chain

On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 6:36:10 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 7 Sep 2017 08:09:27 -0700 (PDT), wrote:

On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 5:11:09 PM UTC-7, John B. wrote:

I think that you are confusing reality with your own fantasies. In
years past I have worked with two engineers who had worked in the
automobile industry. They both said the same thing, that the major
effort in the motor industry was to "make it cheaper".


Gee then it must be the government forcing manufacturers to make cars safer since the fatalities per passenger mile have dropped so precipitously.


You mean like when the government ordered that bumpers must withstand
an impact of 5 mph crash into a parked vehicle of the same weight?
Which isn't applicable to SUV's, minivans, or pickups trucks; only
passenger cars. Apparently trucks and vans never crash.

But of course, that was a stupid law imposed in 1971. More thoughtful
folks amended it in 1982 (for 1983 model year) and reduced it.


John, my wife's older Keo tells her if a tire is low. Is that by government edict? My car warns me if my gas is getting low so that I won't run out on the freeway. Was that a government edict? We are getting small sedans not only swerving in front of tractor trailers but being struck so hard that they are doing multiple roll-overs with the cars totally unrecognizable afterwards and NO INJURIES to the passengers. What are the government edicts? You have to wear your seatbelts.

If you don't know the business don't make your comments as you usually do. It is almost entirely the automotive industry that is improving auto safety.. This is especially important as vehicles become less and less metal. On my smashed up 1999 Ford it appears that the only steel on it is the frame which is bent so badly that one wheel is so high that it isn't touching the ground. There is no damage at all in the passenger compartment. The SUV that struck my car hardly appeared to have any damage beyond the broken right front bumper.

The airbags deployed so the engine automatically turned off to prevent fires.

Living in a backward country apparently makes you think that the entire world is that way. Oh, wait, you think that the medical science in Thailand is as good as the USA. After all you only need 10% of the doctors.
  #67  
Old September 8th 17, 04:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Taya Chain

On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 6:58:42 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:

http://www.cadillacforums.com/forums.../t-335969.html
http://forums.vintage-mustang.com/vi...-identify.html
https://classicoldsmobile.com/forums...placement.html
http://www.imperialclub.com/Repair/Engine/chains.htm


Doug - those were not plastic gears. It was a COATING that could peel off and cause problems. Mostly they plugged the oil system.

I'd be careful blaming jumped timing on the coating. Tearing through the gears drag racing would beat the timing gears to death and this normally caused the timing gear failures. I've seen a tooth broken off and the jackass still driving it with Lord only knows how the gears would work.
  #68  
Old September 8th 17, 04:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,305
Default Taya Chain

On 9/7/2017 7:59 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.


Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.


The fact is that timing belts are actually more reliable than timing
chains on OHC and DOHC engines, as long as you follow the recommended
replacement interval. I recall when Saturn touted that they used a
chain, not a belt, and that the chain would last the life of the engine.
What actually happened was that the engine lasted the life of the chain,
and there were a lot of broken timing chains. Eventually they went back
to a timing belt, but it was too late for Saturn which had gained a
reputation of being unreliable and overpriced, and GM eventually shut
down that division without it ever having made a profit.

---
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  #69  
Old September 8th 17, 04:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,305
Default Taya Chain

On 9/8/2017 8:15 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 12:39:17 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Thursday, September 7, 2017 at 7:59:50 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM,
wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.

Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.


HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA
After how many decades of ****ing off customers because the plastic teeth stripped off of the gears after 40K miles?


The smaller Ford V6 uses rubber timing belts and they insist that you absolutely MUST replace them on 50,000 mile intervals or bye-bye motor. GMC apparently has a V8 that way. My stepdaughter's SUV broke a belt and exploded the motor - the mechanic told her not to replace the motor because the new one would do exactly the same thing.


They are not made of rubber. They are typically made of a combination of
neoprene and kevlar. It is true that the timing belt needs to be
replaced at periodic intervals.

My Ford has the larger V6 with a steel timing belt and they go just short of forever. These cars are advertised 5 years old and with 200,000 miles on them. People actually commute from Sacramento to San Francisco!


Some vehicles have had large numbers of timing chain failures resulting
in the destruction of the engine. The joke among mechanics is that when
a manufacturer states "a timing chain will last the life of the engine"
what they really mean is that "an engine will last the live of the
timing chain." Also, timing chains, like bicycle chains, eventually
stretch, and can jump a tooth.

Timing chains should also be replaced periodically, even though there is
no replacement schedule published.

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  #70  
Old September 8th 17, 05:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,305
Default Taya Chain

On 9/7/2017 7:59 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-09-06 17:25, Doug Landau wrote:
On Wednesday, September 6, 2017 at 1:29:59 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 15:59, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/28/2017 4:28 PM, wrote:
On Monday, August 28, 2017 at 1:59:20 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-08-28 13:43, sms wrote:
I replaced the chain that I broke on Saturday with one I
had in my garage that I must have purchased five to ten
years ago.

It has a connecting link and it says "Taya" on it. It's for
6,7,8 gearing. It seems okay, but I think that this is the
first time I've used a chain with a connecting link since
childhood. I looked up Taya and it's a big Taiwanese chain
manufacturer.


I still have a Sachs-Sedis 7-speed chain on my road bike
which I bought from a friend as NOS, for $6 which was the old
sticker price (the sticker had already turned brownish). No
link, mounted with hammer and anvil as usual. To my utter
amazement it doesn't show any measurable stretch after over
2000mi and sometimes I really put the coals on because of our
hills. Even the old Wippermann chains could not rival that. I
am very religious about chain cleaning and lube though.

The old 5-6-7 speed Sachs chains wore out three days after the
bike was junked.


The Sedis (later Sachs-Sedis) material and Delta hardening
process was not only exceptional but unsurpassed down to today
except for possibly Record chains. That ended with SRAM.


Why is that? In the automotive world such an advance in technology
is kept and further developed, not rescinded and chucked back into
the dust bin. Well, usually.


Simple - the motor runs quieter, and consumers buy it more readily.
Hence we saw plastic teeth on timing gears.


And they make that last 100,000mi before a PM swap. That's what it says
in my SUV's manual and when the old belts came out they still looked
like new.


The recommended timing belt change interval is very conservative. I've
had it done on my SUV at 100K and while the belt did not look new when
it came out, it was clear that it would have gone far longer without
breaking. There are several advantages to timing belts versus timing
chains, especially on engines where a long chain or belt is needed. A
timing chain needs to have a system to keep it oiled. Chains stretch
more than a kevlar reinforced neoprene belt. Chains are noisier. Chains
are expensive to replace and contrary to what some people believe, they
do NOT last "forever" just because there is no scheduled replacement
interval.



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The chain slips seldom when speeding up; can this break the chain? or do I have to line up the back sprockets? Iván C. Filpo Techniques 4 July 20th 06 04:44 PM


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