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CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded



 
 
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  #81  
Old July 18th 19, 12:58 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,626
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On 7/17/2019 5:02 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:50:29 +0100, Tom Evans
wrote:

On 17/07/2019 05:18, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 08:34:12 +1000, James
wrote:

On 16/7/19 3:25 pm, John B. wrote:

:-) Not necessarily so. The sitting by the roadside in the rain I
described was two "finish nails" through the tire. Punctured the first
time, pulled the nail out changed the tube and almost exactly 1
kilometer down the road punctured again, the same kind of nail. I had
used up the only spare tube I was carrying, the patches won't stick,
it is raining.


I was riding with a couple of mates on a wet day and one of them had
three punctures. After emptying his two CO2 canisters on the first two
punctures, he begged for my pump. The patch worked too.

I had some of those glue less, or whatever you call 'em, patches they
didn't stick well in the rain, or at least mine didn't :-(


In WW2 pilots were given a patch kit for the inflatable life raft they
carried, in case they had to ditch in the sea. These patches stuck even
when applied in/under the water.

I'm pretty sure I have patched tyres in the rain successfully. The
problem I remember is my cold fingers having trouble getting the tyre off.


I can't speak for your patches but I can assure you that mine didn't
stick :-)
--
cheers,

John B.


I was curious about patching a wet rubber coated canvas life
raft somewhere in the Pacific in 1945 and found this:

http://www.bellsaviation.com/mm5/mer...egory_Code=SKC

more recent version, better images:

http://www.bellsaviation.com/mm5/mer...o ry_Code=SKC

Doesn't look applicable to a bicycle tube.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #82  
Old July 18th 19, 03:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,975
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On 18/7/19 8:02 am, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:50:29 +0100, Tom Evans
wrote:

On 17/07/2019 05:18, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 08:34:12 +1000, James
wrote:

On 16/7/19 3:25 pm, John B. wrote:

:-) Not necessarily so. The sitting by the roadside in the rain I
described was two "finish nails" through the tire. Punctured the first
time, pulled the nail out changed the tube and almost exactly 1
kilometer down the road punctured again, the same kind of nail. I had
used up the only spare tube I was carrying, the patches won't stick,
it is raining.


I was riding with a couple of mates on a wet day and one of them had
three punctures. After emptying his two CO2 canisters on the first two
punctures, he begged for my pump. The patch worked too.

I had some of those glue less, or whatever you call 'em, patches they
didn't stick well in the rain, or at least mine didn't :-(


In WW2 pilots were given a patch kit for the inflatable life raft they
carried, in case they had to ditch in the sea. These patches stuck even
when applied in/under the water.

I'm pretty sure I have patched tyres in the rain successfully. The
problem I remember is my cold fingers having trouble getting the tyre off.


I can't speak for your patches but I can assure you that mine didn't
stick :-)


I've only had limited success with self adhesive patches too, but normal
patches that require the application of glue to the cleaned butyl rubber
inner tube usually work, even in wet weather. You can usually use your
body to shield the patch area from direct rain. And then there's
this... https://www.butylproducts.co.uk/prod...pair-kits-pro/

"1 x 290ml tube of Adheseal for spot repairs, seam seals and repairs in
wet conditions or below the waterline."

Bicycling submariner?

--
JS
  #83  
Old July 18th 19, 04:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 763
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 12:55:32 +1000, James
wrote:

On 18/7/19 8:02 am, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:50:29 +0100, Tom Evans
wrote:

On 17/07/2019 05:18, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 08:34:12 +1000, James
wrote:

On 16/7/19 3:25 pm, John B. wrote:

:-) Not necessarily so. The sitting by the roadside in the rain I
described was two "finish nails" through the tire. Punctured the first
time, pulled the nail out changed the tube and almost exactly 1
kilometer down the road punctured again, the same kind of nail. I had
used up the only spare tube I was carrying, the patches won't stick,
it is raining.


I was riding with a couple of mates on a wet day and one of them had
three punctures. After emptying his two CO2 canisters on the first two
punctures, he begged for my pump. The patch worked too.

I had some of those glue less, or whatever you call 'em, patches they
didn't stick well in the rain, or at least mine didn't :-(

In WW2 pilots were given a patch kit for the inflatable life raft they
carried, in case they had to ditch in the sea. These patches stuck even
when applied in/under the water.

I'm pretty sure I have patched tyres in the rain successfully. The
problem I remember is my cold fingers having trouble getting the tyre off.


I can't speak for your patches but I can assure you that mine didn't
stick :-)


I've only had limited success with self adhesive patches too, but normal
patches that require the application of glue to the cleaned butyl rubber
inner tube usually work, even in wet weather. You can usually use your
body to shield the patch area from direct rain. And then there's
this... https://www.butylproducts.co.uk/prod...pair-kits-pro/

"1 x 290ml tube of Adheseal for spot repairs, seam seals and repairs in
wet conditions or below the waterline."

Bicycling submariner?

Surface preparation:
The surface must be clean, dry and free of grease. Clean surfaces with
Innotec Multisol or Innotec Seal and Bond Remover. Clean plastic
surfaces with Innotec Repaplast Cleaner Antistatic. Plastic, porous or
extremely difficult surfaces must be pre-treated with Innotec
Repaplast Primer New Formula .
:-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #84  
Old July 18th 19, 09:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Rolf Mantel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 81
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

Am 17.07.2019 um 22:01 schrieb Tom Kunich:
Also throughout the history of the Earth, rather than species
evolving they suddenly appeared in large numbers of species.
This does not look like evolution but rather mutation.

Mutation is a part of evolution. The main building blocks of
evolution a


1) random Mutation that is slow enough to make the definition of a
species meaningful but fast enough to enable adjustment to changing
surroundings


2) survival of the fittest that kills off 99.99% of badly mutated
creatures

Evolution says that these two mechanisms are sufficient to explain
the variety of life forms on earth.


It was Charles Darwin himself that showed charts and comments that
said that evolution proceeded at a constant pace. "As many more
individuals of each species are born than can possibly survive; and
as, consequently, there is a frequently recurring struggle for
existence, it follows that any being, if it vary however slightly in
any manner profitable to itself, under the complex and sometimes
varying conditions of life, will have a better chance of surviving,
and thus be naturally selected. From the strong principle of
inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and
modified form."


Since Charles Darwin's book, there has been the one or other scientist
researching on related topic, starting with Gregor Mendel and not ending
with Richard Dawkins. The basics of evolution occur at (almost)
constant pace (the rate of mutation for example depends on stress
factors like radioactivity but this is irrelevant for the wider picture
of evolution). Emerging aspects, like speciation do not.

Do you know the difference between natural variation and mutation?


I agree, in my previous post, I should have added "natural variation"
(i.e. re-combination of existing genes) on position 1 .

Mutation has absolutely NOTHING to do with evolution. Especially
since most mutations are sterile.


Most Recombinations and most mutations are failures but even nature has
discovered the agile principle "fail often, fail early" ;-)
In humans, approx. half of the fertilized eggs do not survive to reach a
beating heart, on other species the number my be different.
In mammal species that have an average litter size 1, "survival of
the fittest" starts even in the womb.
Other recombinations and mutations might cause sterile offspring and
hence also be "failures" in the long term.

Positive mutations that give a significant advantage are rare. I
remember reading that development of "modern man" depended on three
specific mutations in the last couple of million years to prodive us
with our well-functioning brain (and they had to be in the right order,
the first mutation was a pre-requisite for surviving the third one).
Geneticists are now able to pin-point the date of these mutations quite
well by now.


  #85  
Old July 18th 19, 10:11 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Rolf Mantel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 81
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

Am 18.07.2019 um 01:22 schrieb Tom Kunich:
The orbital variation of Earth is 3,104,641 miles. If this was to
vary by just 1,000 miles - 0.03% - life could not exist on this
planet. It the Moon didn't exist in its EXACT orbit or if there was
1% less moisture on Earth life could not exist.

But you think that somehow magic occurred and life formed almost
instantly after the Earth formed. Life formed on the Earth a bare
800,000,000 after the Earth formed and began to cool.

But to you that's evolution. It must be wonderful to believe in
miracles.


Evolution does not talk at all about how life (self-replicating matter)
formed in the first place. Evolution only gives an explanation on the
path from the first bacteria to the modern teeming life.

Evolution starts with "a life-form reproduces in a non-perfect way".
  #86  
Old July 18th 19, 01:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Evans
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 27
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On 18/07/2019 00:58, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/17/2019 5:02 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:50:29 +0100, Tom Evans
wrote:

On 17/07/2019 05:18, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 08:34:12 +1000, James
wrote:

On 16/7/19 3:25 pm, John B. wrote:

¬*¬*¬* :-) Not necessarily so. The sitting by the roadside in the rain I
described was two "finish nails" through the tire. Punctured the
first
time, pulled the nail out changed the tube and almost exactly 1
kilometer down the road punctured again, the same kind of nail. I had
used up the only spare tube I was carrying, the patches won't stick,
it is raining.


I was riding with a couple of mates on a wet day and one of them had
three punctures.¬* After emptying his two CO2 canisters on the first
two
punctures, he begged for my pump.¬* The patch worked too.

I had some of those glue less, or whatever you call 'em, patches they
didn't stick well in the rain, or at least mine didn't¬* :-(

In WW2 pilots were given a patch kit for the inflatable life raft they
carried, in case they had to ditch in the sea. These patches stuck even
when applied in/under the water.

I'm pretty sure I have patched tyres in the rain successfully. The
problem I remember is my cold fingers having trouble getting the tyre
off.


I can't speak for¬* your patches but I can assure you that mine didn't
stick :-)
--
cheers,

John B.


I was curious about patching a wet rubber coated canvas life raft
somewhere in the Pacific in 1945 and found this:

http://www.bellsaviation.com/mm5/mer...egory_Code=SKC


more recent version, better images:

http://www.bellsaviation.com/mm5/mer...o ry_Code=SKC


Doesn't look applicable to a bicycle tube.


Someone I know, who did ditch in the North Sea, said that he did use
glue and patches and he compared it to fixing a bike tube. He described
it a being a bit like being in the bucket with an inner tube looking for
bubbles.
  #87  
Old July 18th 19, 11:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 763
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On Thu, 18 Jul 2019 13:48:10 +0100, Tom Evans
wrote:

On 18/07/2019 00:58, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/17/2019 5:02 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 10:50:29 +0100, Tom Evans
wrote:

On 17/07/2019 05:18, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 17 Jul 2019 08:34:12 +1000, James
wrote:

On 16/7/19 3:25 pm, John B. wrote:

*** :-) Not necessarily so. The sitting by the roadside in the rain I
described was two "finish nails" through the tire. Punctured the
first
time, pulled the nail out changed the tube and almost exactly 1
kilometer down the road punctured again, the same kind of nail. I had
used up the only spare tube I was carrying, the patches won't stick,
it is raining.


I was riding with a couple of mates on a wet day and one of them had
three punctures.* After emptying his two CO2 canisters on the first
two
punctures, he begged for my pump.* The patch worked too.

I had some of those glue less, or whatever you call 'em, patches they
didn't stick well in the rain, or at least mine didn't* :-(

In WW2 pilots were given a patch kit for the inflatable life raft they
carried, in case they had to ditch in the sea. These patches stuck even
when applied in/under the water.

I'm pretty sure I have patched tyres in the rain successfully. The
problem I remember is my cold fingers having trouble getting the tyre
off.

I can't speak for* your patches but I can assure you that mine didn't
stick :-)
--
cheers,

John B.


I was curious about patching a wet rubber coated canvas life raft
somewhere in the Pacific in 1945 and found this:

http://www.bellsaviation.com/mm5/mer...egory_Code=SKC


more recent version, better images:

http://www.bellsaviation.com/mm5/mer...o ry_Code=SKC


Doesn't look applicable to a bicycle tube.


Someone I know, who did ditch in the North Sea, said that he did use
glue and patches and he compared it to fixing a bike tube. He described
it a being a bit like being in the bucket with an inner tube looking for
bubbles.


While I never patch a rubber boat in the N. Sea I did have a "rubber"
dinghy with one of my sailboats that leaked, There was a place in town
that actual built rubber dinghies and I went to them for help and they
gave me a half tube of "glue" and some patching material which was
just the same material that the dinghy was built with which was a
single layer of some sort of "cloth" with rubber on both sides all
bonded into one sheet of material.. The glue had to be kept in the
fridge for some reason, perhaps because it had been opened.

The technique was the same as a inner tube - blow it up find the leak,
mark the leak with a magic marker, deflate, sand the leak area and
spread glue on both the tube and the patch, let dry and than apply the
patch and clamp in place with two pieces of wood and a C clamp.Come
back tomorrow and inflate it.
Worked every time.


--
cheers,

John B.

  #88  
Old July 21st 19, 03:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,070
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 05:18:35 +0700, John B.
wrote:

While I never patch a rubber boat in the N. Sea I did have a "rubber"
dinghy with one of my sailboats that leaked, There was a place in town
that actual built rubber dinghies and I went to them for help and they
gave me a half tube of "glue" and some patching material which was
just the same material that the dinghy was built with which was a
single layer of some sort of "cloth" with rubber on both sides all
bonded into one sheet of material.. The glue had to be kept in the
fridge for some reason, perhaps because it had been opened.

The technique was the same as a inner tube - blow it up find the leak,
mark the leak with a magic marker, deflate, sand the leak area and
spread glue on both the tube and the patch, let dry and than apply the
patch and clamp in place with two pieces of wood and a C clamp.Come
back tomorrow and inflate it.
Worked every time.


It's more fun to do a hot patch.

Old School Vulcanizing Tire Patch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ennV0BVFZVw
(Notice how he leaves the can of mineral spirits wide open while he
has an open fire burning a few inches away).

Today, electrically heated tire vulcanizers are safer (but less fun):
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32634935852.html

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #89  
Old July 21st 19, 03:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,406
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On Saturday, July 20, 2019 at 10:31:20 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 05:18:35 +0700, John B.
wrote:

While I never patch a rubber boat in the N. Sea I did have a "rubber"
dinghy with one of my sailboats that leaked, There was a place in town
that actual built rubber dinghies and I went to them for help and they
gave me a half tube of "glue" and some patching material which was
just the same material that the dinghy was built with which was a
single layer of some sort of "cloth" with rubber on both sides all
bonded into one sheet of material.. The glue had to be kept in the
fridge for some reason, perhaps because it had been opened.

The technique was the same as a inner tube - blow it up find the leak,
mark the leak with a magic marker, deflate, sand the leak area and
spread glue on both the tube and the patch, let dry and than apply the
patch and clamp in place with two pieces of wood and a C clamp.Come
back tomorrow and inflate it.
Worked every time.


It's more fun to do a hot patch.

Old School Vulcanizing Tire Patch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ennV0BVFZVw
(Notice how he leaves the can of mineral spirits wide open while he
has an open fire burning a few inches away).

Today, electrically heated tire vulcanizers are safer (but less fun):
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32634935852.html

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558


Notice the open bottle of beer too? Perhaps that explains it.

Cheers
  #90  
Old July 21st 19, 10:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,330
Default CO2 Connectors - Threaded vs Unthreaded

On 21/07/2019 04:36, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Saturday, July 20, 2019 at 10:31:20 PM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:
On Fri, 19 Jul 2019 05:18:35 +0700, John B.
wrote:

While I never patch a rubber boat in the N. Sea I did have a
"rubber" dinghy with one of my sailboats that leaked, There was a
place in town that actual built rubber dinghies and I went to
them for help and they gave me a half tube of "glue" and some
patching material which was just the same material that the
dinghy was built with which was a single layer of some sort of
"cloth" with rubber on both sides all bonded into one sheet of
material.. The glue had to be kept in the fridge for some reason,
perhaps because it had been opened.

The technique was the same as a inner tube - blow it up find the
leak, mark the leak with a magic marker, deflate, sand the leak
area and spread glue on both the tube and the patch, let dry and
than apply the patch and clamp in place with two pieces of wood
and a C clamp.Come back tomorrow and inflate it. Worked every
time.


It's more fun to do a hot patch.

Old School Vulcanizing Tire Patch
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ennV0BVFZVw (Notice how he leaves
the can of mineral spirits wide open while he has an open fire
burning a few inches away).

Today, electrically heated tire vulcanizers are safer (but less
fun): https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32634935852.html

-- Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com Santa Cruz CA 95060
http://802.11junk.com Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS
831-336-2558


Notice the open bottle of beer too? Perhaps that explains it.


The shopping list is interesting as well!


 




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