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Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?



 
 
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  #321  
Old November 10th 17, 06:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On 2017-11-09 17:25, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 09 Nov 2017 07:39:34 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-08 21:36, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 08 Nov 2017 15:20:34 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-04 21:41, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 04 Nov 2017 08:00:49 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-03 17:47, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 03 Nov 2017 07:53:04 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-01 19:23, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 01 Nov 2017 13:56:24 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-01 13:39, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 12:35:34 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:

A lever is never supposed to bottom out before the brake force on
respective wheel is maxed. If it did then he'd have faulty brakes
and I am sure he'd not have posted this. The guys look like serious
cyclists who know this.

How old are you again Joerg? With even the old Campy brakes it was
possible to bottom out the levers often without locking the wheels.


I clearly consider that a faulty brake system. In Germany they would
instantly disqualify a motor vehicle with such a flaw and not even let
you ride it off the TUEV test site.

But Jeorg, you aren't in Germany.


So that makes it ok to tool around in traffic with faulty equipment?

Goodness! You mean that if it isn't acceptable in Germany it is
automatically faulty and absolutely cannot be used in the rest of the
world?


A vehicle where the brake force is not at absolute max with full
actuation is faulty. Always.


Somehow, I don't think that you are correct.


So you honestly think that a bike where the levers bottom out while the
wheels are still not locked up is "safe to go"?

If that's true I am glad you are no longer maintaining aircraft. I have
a very different philosophy about safety.

Ah Joerg, such squirming about.

You say that it isn't acceptable in Germany and I remind you that you
aren't in Germany. You then argue that "it isn't safe to fool around
in traffic with faulty equipment" and I ask you " Goodness! You mean
that if it isn't acceptable in Germany it is automatically faulty and
absolutely cannot be used in the rest of the world?"

Now you are into brake levers and you have never answered the question
of whether if it isn't approved in Germany it can't be used anywhere?

So lets get back to the basic point. You imply that something that is
unacceptable in Germany should not be used in the rest of the world
and I say "Somehow, I don't think that you are correct."

After we settle the question of German superiority we can get into the
brake levers and all the other bumph.

Or of course, we could discuss brake levers and ignore the whole
question of what is approved in Germany as immaterial.


What nonsense. This is _not_ about countries, this is about riding
around on unsafe equipment and endangering self as well as others. It's
just that some countries check this sort of stuff for some vehicles
while in others they don't give a hoot and let the more careless people
crash.

Well, if it is about riding and not countries why did you bring up the
argument that it wouldn't be allowed in Germany?


Merely to show that bottoming-out brake actuators are considered a
safety hazard by agencies or notified bodies. In Germany and some other
parts of the world it is mandatory to have motor vehicles checked for
that stuff, in others it isn't.


And what in the world does Germany have to do with anything. Why, they
can't even speak English. How can their opinions count for anything?


For the last time: It was merely an _example_ and it doesn';t matter
which country. The German TUEV knows very well what is safe and what
isn't. They have legal authority to non-op a vehicle that won't pass the
test. In most US states you don't have such tests and thus it doesn't
get discovered if an operator is as careless as had been described in
this thread. In NY they have tests AFAIK and I am sure their authorities
will also non-op a vehicle when the brake actuator bottoms out before
full brake force has been reached. As they should.


It is unsafe no matter what and this was only an example.


Since you either don't understand it or don't want to understand, any
further discussion about this with you is useless.

Of course I don't understand it. Here you are in America and arguing
that "it wouldn't be allowed in Germany".


It isn't allowed in the US either but in most states nobody ever checks.
Until there is a nasty crash. Then the insurance lawyers will try to
find out and (rightfully) sue and subrogate.


Not germane at all. Unless, of course, California has become a
province of Germany, that is.



You seem to have a hard time understanding logic.


No, not really. I just can't equate what they do in Germany with what
is the proper thing to do in the U.S. I mean, a bunch of guys jumping
about in leather shorts and drinking beer?



Educate yourself on roadworthiness checks. In some areas of this world
they are mandatory, in others they aren't.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
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  #322  
Old November 11th 17, 02:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On Fri, 10 Nov 2017 09:39:28 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-09 17:25, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 09 Nov 2017 07:39:34 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-08 21:36, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 08 Nov 2017 15:20:34 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-04 21:41, John B. wrote:
On Sat, 04 Nov 2017 08:00:49 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-03 17:47, John B. wrote:
On Fri, 03 Nov 2017 07:53:04 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-01 19:23, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 01 Nov 2017 13:56:24 -0700, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-11-01 13:39, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 12:35:34 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:

A lever is never supposed to bottom out before the brake force on
respective wheel is maxed. If it did then he'd have faulty brakes
and I am sure he'd not have posted this. The guys look like serious
cyclists who know this.

How old are you again Joerg? With even the old Campy brakes it was
possible to bottom out the levers often without locking the wheels.


I clearly consider that a faulty brake system. In Germany they would
instantly disqualify a motor vehicle with such a flaw and not even let
you ride it off the TUEV test site.

But Jeorg, you aren't in Germany.


So that makes it ok to tool around in traffic with faulty equipment?

Goodness! You mean that if it isn't acceptable in Germany it is
automatically faulty and absolutely cannot be used in the rest of the
world?


A vehicle where the brake force is not at absolute max with full
actuation is faulty. Always.


Somehow, I don't think that you are correct.


So you honestly think that a bike where the levers bottom out while the
wheels are still not locked up is "safe to go"?

If that's true I am glad you are no longer maintaining aircraft. I have
a very different philosophy about safety.

Ah Joerg, such squirming about.

You say that it isn't acceptable in Germany and I remind you that you
aren't in Germany. You then argue that "it isn't safe to fool around
in traffic with faulty equipment" and I ask you " Goodness! You mean
that if it isn't acceptable in Germany it is automatically faulty and
absolutely cannot be used in the rest of the world?"

Now you are into brake levers and you have never answered the question
of whether if it isn't approved in Germany it can't be used anywhere?

So lets get back to the basic point. You imply that something that is
unacceptable in Germany should not be used in the rest of the world
and I say "Somehow, I don't think that you are correct."

After we settle the question of German superiority we can get into the
brake levers and all the other bumph.

Or of course, we could discuss brake levers and ignore the whole
question of what is approved in Germany as immaterial.


What nonsense. This is _not_ about countries, this is about riding
around on unsafe equipment and endangering self as well as others. It's
just that some countries check this sort of stuff for some vehicles
while in others they don't give a hoot and let the more careless people
crash.

Well, if it is about riding and not countries why did you bring up the
argument that it wouldn't be allowed in Germany?


Merely to show that bottoming-out brake actuators are considered a
safety hazard by agencies or notified bodies. In Germany and some other
parts of the world it is mandatory to have motor vehicles checked for
that stuff, in others it isn't.


And what in the world does Germany have to do with anything. Why, they
can't even speak English. How can their opinions count for anything?


For the last time: It was merely an _example_ and it doesn';t matter
which country. The German TUEV knows very well what is safe and what
isn't. They have legal authority to non-op a vehicle that won't pass the
test. In most US states you don't have such tests and thus it doesn't
get discovered if an operator is as careless as had been described in
this thread. In NY they have tests AFAIK and I am sure their authorities
will also non-op a vehicle when the brake actuator bottoms out before
full brake force has been reached. As they should.

If it is merely an example, we might compare, oh say Vietnam which is
a little larger then Germany with ~95 million to Germany's 82 million
population. Nope, don't see any bicycle inspections required there. Or
maybe Bangladesh? About twice the population and not a bike inspection
in sight.

Then, of course, we have India and China with about 33 times the
population of Germany.... still no mandatory bicycle inspection.



It is unsafe no matter what and this was only an example.


Since you either don't understand it or don't want to understand, any
further discussion about this with you is useless.

Of course I don't understand it. Here you are in America and arguing
that "it wouldn't be allowed in Germany".


It isn't allowed in the US either but in most states nobody ever checks.
Until there is a nasty crash. Then the insurance lawyers will try to
find out and (rightfully) sue and subrogate.


Not germane at all. Unless, of course, California has become a
province of Germany, that is.


You seem to have a hard time understanding logic.


No, not really. I just can't equate what they do in Germany with what
is the proper thing to do in the U.S. I mean, a bunch of guys jumping
about in leather shorts and drinking beer?



Educate yourself on roadworthiness checks. In some areas of this world
they are mandatory, in others they aren't.


Exactly. Germany, apparently inspects bicycles while the majority of
the world... including the U.S. where you now live, doesn't. Is this
proof that Germany does good while the rest of the world does bad? Or
is it proof that Germany restricts an individual's freedom to do what
he/she wants even more then any other country.

And, if it is proof that Germany is a better place whatever are you
doing in the U.S. where things are so chaotic?

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #323  
Old November 11th 17, 02:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,837
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On 11/10/2017 7:31 PM, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-09 17:25, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-08 21:36, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-04 21:41, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-03 17:47, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-01 19:23, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-01 13:39, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 12:35:34 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:


-snip snip-

Educate yourself on roadworthiness checks. In some areas of this world
they are mandatory, in others they aren't.


Exactly. Germany, apparently inspects bicycles while the majority of
the world... including the U.S. where you now live, doesn't. Is this
proof that Germany does good while the rest of the world does bad? Or
is it proof that Germany restricts an individual's freedom to do what
he/she wants even more then any other country.

And, if it is proof that Germany is a better place whatever are you
doing in the U.S. where things are so chaotic?



An old saying:

In Germany everything is forbidden, unless it is allowed.
In USA everything is allowed, unless it's forbidden.
In Italy everything is allowed even if it is forbidden.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #324  
Old November 11th 17, 04:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,482
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 5:49:53 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/10/2017 7:31 PM, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-09 17:25, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-08 21:36, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-04 21:41, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-03 17:47, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-01 19:23, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-01 13:39, wrote:
On Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at 12:35:34 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:


-snip snip-

Educate yourself on roadworthiness checks. In some areas of this world
they are mandatory, in others they aren't.


Exactly. Germany, apparently inspects bicycles while the majority of
the world... including the U.S. where you now live, doesn't. Is this
proof that Germany does good while the rest of the world does bad? Or
is it proof that Germany restricts an individual's freedom to do what
he/she wants even more then any other country.

And, if it is proof that Germany is a better place whatever are you
doing in the U.S. where things are so chaotic?



An old saying:

In Germany everything is forbidden, unless it is allowed.
In USA everything is allowed, unless it's forbidden.
In Italy everything is allowed even if it is forbidden.


BTW, I don't think there is a mandatory bicycle inspection in Germany. It's like most places where there are equipment requirements, and the police enforce those requirements on an ad hoc basis -- usually as part of a stop for some other reason. I also don't get why John B is arguing about non-functioning brakes. Why would anyone want to ride a bike with brakes that bottom out at the lever before stopping the wheel? That seems like a pretty non-controversial point. I don't think most people need discs with giant rotors, but Joerg is a special case.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #325  
Old November 11th 17, 04:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On 2017-11-11 07:21, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, November 10, 2017 at 5:49:53 PM UTC-8, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/10/2017 7:31 PM, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-09 17:25, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-08 21:36, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-04 21:41, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-03 17:47, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-01 19:23, John B. wrote:
Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-01 13:39,
wrote:
On Wednesday, November 1, 2017 at
12:35:34 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:


-snip snip-

Educate yourself on roadworthiness checks. In some areas of
this world they are mandatory, in others they aren't.


Exactly. Germany, apparently inspects bicycles while the majority
of the world... including the U.S. where you now live, doesn't.
Is this proof that Germany does good while the rest of the world
does bad? Or is it proof that Germany restricts an individual's
freedom to do what he/she wants even more then any other
country.

And, if it is proof that Germany is a better place whatever are
you doing in the U.S. where things are so chaotic?



An old saying:

In Germany everything is forbidden, unless it is allowed. In USA
everything is allowed, unless it's forbidden. In Italy everything
is allowed even if it is forbidden.


BTW, I don't think there is a mandatory bicycle inspection in
Germany.



There isn't and I never wrote that. There is one for cars, mandatory
every two years, and that's what I brought as an example. One of the
tests is hard braking on the roller set. If the pedal bottoms out before
full force is achieved or even goes a bit lower than usual they'll slap
an inop sticker on the whole car. You can only have it hauled off by a
tow truck (and must do so within a reasonable time frame).


... It's like most places where there are equipment
requirements, and the police enforce those requirements on an ad hoc
basis -- usually as part of a stop for some other reason. I also
don't get why John B is arguing about non-functioning brakes. Why
would anyone want to ride a bike with brakes that bottom out at the
lever before stopping the wheel? That seems like a pretty
non-controversial point.



To ride a bike like that would border on stupid.


... I don't think most people need discs with
giant rotors, but Joerg is a special case.


All one has to do is go down French Creek Road and then Holly Drive out
here on a loaded bike and the li'l 6-incher in back starts to smell.
Can't use the front too much because it's loose gravel. Similar for some
of the long hills in the Sierra east of here. The 8" rotors I mounted
yesterday will allow me to roll down many of the long downslopes without
a cooling-off break or spritzing water onto the rotors.

A friend had 8" on the front and still lost the front brake at the last
curve on a long hillside. One of those "Oh s..t!" experiences.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #326  
Old November 11th 17, 05:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,404
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On 11/11/2017 10:37 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-11 07:21, jbeattie wrote:

********* ... I don't think most people need discs with
giant rotors, but Joerg is a special case.


All one has to do is go down French Creek Road and then Holly Drive out
here on a loaded bike and the li'l 6-incher in back starts to smell.
Can't use the front too much because it's loose gravel. Similar for some
of the long hills in the Sierra east of here. The 8" rotors I mounted
yesterday will allow me to roll down many of the long downslopes without
a cooling-off break or spritzing water onto the rotors.

A friend had 8" on the front and still lost the front brake at the last
curve on a long hillside. One of those "Oh s..t!" experiences.


Hmm. So even 8" isn't sufficient. Good to know.

My brakes are about 25" diameter. I'm keeping them! ;-)


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #327  
Old November 11th 17, 05:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,837
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On 11/11/2017 10:34 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2017 10:37 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-11 07:21, jbeattie wrote:

... I don't think most people need
discs with
giant rotors, but Joerg is a special case.


All one has to do is go down French Creek Road and then
Holly Drive out here on a loaded bike and the li'l
6-incher in back starts to smell. Can't use the front too
much because it's loose gravel. Similar for some of the
long hills in the Sierra east of here. The 8" rotors I
mounted yesterday will allow me to roll down many of the
long downslopes without a cooling-off break or spritzing
water onto the rotors.

A friend had 8" on the front and still lost the front
brake at the last curve on a long hillside. One of those
"Oh s..t!" experiences.


Hmm. So even 8" isn't sufficient. Good to know.

My brakes are about 25" diameter. I'm keeping them! ;-)



Are you saying a significant factor for brake performance is
swept area? Who knew?

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #328  
Old November 11th 17, 05:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,482
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 8:34:13 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2017 10:37 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-11 07:21, jbeattie wrote:

********* ... I don't think most people need discs with
giant rotors, but Joerg is a special case.


All one has to do is go down French Creek Road and then Holly Drive out
here on a loaded bike and the li'l 6-incher in back starts to smell.
Can't use the front too much because it's loose gravel. Similar for some
of the long hills in the Sierra east of here. The 8" rotors I mounted
yesterday will allow me to roll down many of the long downslopes without
a cooling-off break or spritzing water onto the rotors.

A friend had 8" on the front and still lost the front brake at the last
curve on a long hillside. One of those "Oh s..t!" experiences.


Hmm. So even 8" isn't sufficient. Good to know.

My brakes are about 25" diameter. I'm keeping them! ;-)


In Joerg's neighborhood but much further into the Sierra, I did Monitor Pass, Ebbetts, Carson and Luther multiple times on loaded and unloaded bikes with either single pivot Campy NR or Mafac cantis. Tioga, too. Ebbets has some 20% pitches. I never once had brake problems.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #329  
Old November 11th 17, 07:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On 2017-11-11 08:59, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 8:34:13 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 11/11/2017 10:37 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-11 07:21, jbeattie wrote:

... I don't think most people need discs with giant rotors, but
Joerg is a special case.


All one has to do is go down French Creek Road and then Holly
Drive out here on a loaded bike and the li'l 6-incher in back
starts to smell. Can't use the front too much because it's loose
gravel. Similar for some of the long hills in the Sierra east of
here. The 8" rotors I mounted yesterday will allow me to roll
down many of the long downslopes without a cooling-off break or
spritzing water onto the rotors.

A friend had 8" on the front and still lost the front brake at
the last curve on a long hillside. One of those "Oh s..t!"
experiences.


Hmm. So even 8" isn't sufficient. Good to know.

My brakes are about 25" diameter. I'm keeping them! ;-)


In Joerg's neighborhood but much further into the Sierra, I did
Monitor Pass, Ebbetts, Carson and Luther multiple times on loaded and
unloaded bikes with either single pivot Campy NR or Mafac cantis.
Tioga, too. Ebbets has some 20% pitches. I never once had brake
problems.


Very different scenario because there you can just "let'er rip" most of
the time. I described a road that has a long downhill stretch and is
gravel. You have to hold the brakes the whole time because there is
forest left and right. Sure enough about 70% down a Shepherd and a
smaller dogs came out of the woodwork and were totally unfazed but my
brightly lit aluminum horse. They sauntered across. At 40mph that would
have been a nasty crash. At 15mph I could even greet the dogs properly.
There are also diagonal ruts and washouts that you won't see in time at
high speed. A reminder could be seen in one curve where a car driver
must have thought differently, flew off the road and chopped some trees.
The wreckage was already hauled off but there still was a torn-off front
axle and a ripped out coil spring way out in the bushes. Ghastly.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #330  
Old November 11th 17, 08:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,482
Default Why do some forks and frames have brake rotor size limits?

On Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 10:47:10 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-11 08:59, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, November 11, 2017 at 8:34:13 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
On 11/11/2017 10:37 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-11-11 07:21, jbeattie wrote:

... I don't think most people need discs with giant rotors, but
Joerg is a special case.


All one has to do is go down French Creek Road and then Holly
Drive out here on a loaded bike and the li'l 6-incher in back
starts to smell. Can't use the front too much because it's loose
gravel. Similar for some of the long hills in the Sierra east of
here. The 8" rotors I mounted yesterday will allow me to roll
down many of the long downslopes without a cooling-off break or
spritzing water onto the rotors.

A friend had 8" on the front and still lost the front brake at
the last curve on a long hillside. One of those "Oh s..t!"
experiences.

Hmm. So even 8" isn't sufficient. Good to know.

My brakes are about 25" diameter. I'm keeping them! ;-)


In Joerg's neighborhood but much further into the Sierra, I did
Monitor Pass, Ebbetts, Carson and Luther multiple times on loaded and
unloaded bikes with either single pivot Campy NR or Mafac cantis.
Tioga, too. Ebbets has some 20% pitches. I never once had brake
problems.


Very different scenario because there you can just "let'er rip" most of
the time. I described a road that has a long downhill stretch and is
gravel. You have to hold the brakes the whole time because there is
forest left and right. Sure enough about 70% down a Shepherd and a
smaller dogs came out of the woodwork and were totally unfazed but my
brightly lit aluminum horse. They sauntered across. At 40mph that would
have been a nasty crash. At 15mph I could even greet the dogs properly.
There are also diagonal ruts and washouts that you won't see in time at
high speed. A reminder could be seen in one curve where a car driver
must have thought differently, flew off the road and chopped some trees.
The wreckage was already hauled off but there still was a torn-off front
axle and a ripped out coil spring way out in the bushes. Ghastly.


Actually, you can't let 'er rip down Ebbetts. My son, who is about 200lbs, 6'5" and basically all leg muscle, descends Guardsman's Pass on CF rims and caliper brakes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=hRM3bFXlyNk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NKdVMYo1H38 Basically the whole world descends much hairier descents than French Grade Road on pretty mundane equipment. Having forest to the left and right is basically SOP around here. I could commute to work on Fire Lane 5 if I were so inclined. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbWCFwIxgnw&t=62s (on a CX bike). It gets nasty at 3:00. Anyway, get to the bottom, turn right and you're practically down town. I've done that on a SuperSix.

Speaking of climbing, my son's friend Luke did an Everest the other day -- almost 34,000 feet in 120 miles in 11 hours. 100 times up an 11% neighborhood road in the upper Avenues in SLC. The guy is a phenom. He's on track for over a million feet of climbing this year, and he was off his bike due to a serious injury for a month. His last Everest was up every canyon in SLC, including the Midway side of Guardsman Pass, which is one of the most difficult climbs/descents in the US. All on caliper brakes. Yes, it's not Cameron Park, but still some serious climbs.

-- Jay Beattie.
 




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FS: Wheels / Rotor Cranks / Bike Frames etc. Mike Marketplace 0 January 21st 05 10:28 PM
FS: Wheels / Frames / Aerobars / Rotor Cranks etc. Mike Marketplace 0 January 13th 05 03:41 PM
disc brake rotor size, 6 or 8? Colin Song Mountain Biking 9 October 28th 03 11:35 PM
Disc brake rotor size Michael Techniques 9 July 14th 03 04:43 AM


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