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rear-facing dropouts



 
 
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  #21  
Old October 25th 18, 02:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 8,821
Default rear-facing dropouts

On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 6:16:32 AM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:

https://surlybikes.com/parts/drivetrain/singleator

Which works very well imho, giving me the perceived advantages of a hub
drive, without the hassle of chain tensioning or the fudge or a short
reach derailleur. Yes Andre, I know, I can live with it.


I saw that, Frank; it's not a crime to insist on beautiful bicycle components. Actually I'm an admirer of Surly. Always use their stainless steel chainrings when I can.

Andre Jute
Karate Monkey
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  #22  
Old October 25th 18, 06:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Theodore Heise[_2_]
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Posts: 89
Default rear-facing dropouts

On Wed, 24 Oct 2018 08:05:34 -0500,
AMuzi wrote:
On 10/24/2018 5:59 AM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today there was a gorgeous open-frame steel bike from the 60s
or 70s


Sounds lovely.


The only wrench in the machinery is that it has rear-facing
dropouts, and the o-bolts to grab the rear wheel axle to
tighten the chain were missing. If it ever had any! Or were
they always there on such bikes?

I think such, now exotic spare parts can be difficult to
find... Can you get away without them?


Chain tensioners are handy on roadsters to get the wheel
centered what with full mudguards, chain case, stirrup brake
and so on before tightening the axle nuts. They are not
necessary by any means and in fact the #1 problem with them is
riders setting chain tension too high which causes excessive
chain and bearing wear.

A QR holds as tight or tighter than axle nuts but either are
adequate especially on single speed where the gearing is not as
low as touring setups. Racing rules for track prohibit QR. That
and tradition are why real track bikes use solid axles. (My own
fixie is QR, never posed any problem whatsoever))


Mine too, also with zero problems.

--
Ted Heise West Lafayette, IN, USA
  #23  
Old October 26th 18, 06:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
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Posts: 1,207
Default rear-facing dropouts

On 10/25/18 3:46 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 6:16:32 AM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:

https://surlybikes.com/parts/drivetrain/singleator

Which works very well imho, giving me the perceived advantages of a
hub drive, without the hassle of chain tensioning or the fudge or a
short reach derailleur. Yes Andre, I know, I can live with it.


I saw that, Frank; it's not a crime to insist on beautiful bicycle
components. Actually I'm an admirer of Surly. Always use their
stainless steel chainrings when I can.


I was converted to them around 7 years ago, they work well and in a
hub/fixed/single environment work well. The current commuter is going
in to it's third winter on this drive-train which was unheard of in my
derailleur days. I think it's a KMC Z510HX. No complaints at all
  #24  
Old October 26th 18, 03:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 8,821
Default rear-facing dropouts

On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 6:18:14 AM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:
On 10/25/18 3:46 PM, Andre Jute wrote:
On Thursday, October 25, 2018 at 6:16:32 AM UTC+1, Tosspot wrote:

https://surlybikes.com/parts/drivetrain/singleator

Which works very well imho, giving me the perceived advantages of a
hub drive, without the hassle of chain tensioning or the fudge or a
short reach derailleur. Yes Andre, I know, I can live with it.


I saw that, Frank; it's not a crime to insist on beautiful bicycle
components. Actually I'm an admirer of Surly. Always use their
stainless steel chainrings when I can.


I was converted to them around 7 years ago, they work well and in a
hub/fixed/single environment work well. The current commuter is going
in to it's third winter on this drive-train which was unheard of in my
derailleur days. I think it's a KMC Z510HX. No complaints at all


KMC chains are another fave of mine, especially the KMC X8, which I buy in bulk at CRC sales and give away to pedal pals. Back in my Shimano Nexus gruppo days I used to consider myself lucky if I got a thousand miles out of an entire transmission chain of crankset/chainring, chain and sprocket, and considered people who bragged that they got 10K out of a chain as liars. Since I switched to Rohloff sprockets, Surly Stainless chainrings and KMC chains I get three thousand miles out of the chain and already over 6K out of the chainring and sprocket, both unmarked.

I'll tell you something else that has been utterly surprising: I used to get a thousand miles max out of a set of tyres (the usual crap my LBS stocked, including some surprisingly reputable names) until I switched to Schwalbe's Big Apples: I've swapped out a pair at over 5K that still had tread on the front. Schwalbe says you can run them until the protection band appears through he rubber but I swapped that pair out earlier because after years flat-free, suddenly I had two flats in a few months, the second one a violent header on a downhill with three cars close behind me; they all stopped in time and all three drivers came to offer assistance. Since I run the tyres at low pressure and typically do not swerve for potholes and often jump onto kerbs, both flats were caused by fishbites, which led me to look into other fat tyres but there's nothing quite like the Big Apple for comfort and, surprisingly, speed and control at speed, so I just fitted the same again.

Andre Jute
May all the cycling gods bless the nostalgia that brough back the balloon tyre
  #25  
Old October 26th 18, 04:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default rear-facing dropouts

Andre Jute wrote:

which led me to look into other fat tyres but
there's nothing quite like the Big Apple for
comfort and, surprisingly, speed and control
at speed, so I just fitted the same again.


There seems to be Big Apples in different
sizes... [1]

I have Maxxis Ikon 57-622 (or 29x2.20") and the
comfort and speed is amazing. Now that MTBs are
so fast I think the common guy should get
a MTB, rather than a road bike, if [s]he is
only getting one bike. It is more adventurous,
much better suited as a utility, and also more
creative, as you can put on lots of extra stuff
without having to really worry about making the
bike too heavy. It is more versatile, and fun.
Expensive road bikes will be for the cycling
elite is my prediction, that is with the whole
lycra and helmet gear, cycling almost
exclusively for the sake of cycling...

[1] https://www.schwalbe.com/en/tour-reader/big-apple.html

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #26  
Old October 27th 18, 12:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
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Posts: 8,821
Default rear-facing dropouts

On Friday, October 26, 2018 at 4:03:53 PM UTC+1, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Andre Jute wrote:

which led me to look into other fat tyres but
there's nothing quite like the Big Apple for
comfort and, surprisingly, speed and control
at speed, so I just fitted the same again.


There seems to be Big Apples in different
sizes... [1]


Yes. Most of my bikes are Dutch commuter types with some kind extra edge, called "vakansiefietse", luxurious holiday bikes. But one is a very well developed modern copy of the 1936 Locomotive Unisex Crossframe Deluxe, which was kept in production by Gazelle until 1963 as the "priester rijwiel" (priest's bicycle, for priests who typically wore long coats with a division front and rear so they could ride a bicycle). The development by Utopia of Germany with the Dutch firm Van Raam as their technical partner was intended to turn it into the world's most capable loaded tourer, in which they succeeded. But the price of the bike, and its features, were such that solid citizens bought it as an everyday bike, a utility bike, a bike to speed down Alpine passes with confidence, a shopping bike. The keys are that the redevelopment centred around the biggest Big Apple, 60x622, for which the bike was designed from the ground up, and the very stiff three-dimensional cross frame it inherited from the Locomotief bestseller for which the tubes and lugs for the modernized version were specially developed and drawn by Columbus of Italy whose main business is chasses for Ferrari. The result is an awesomely competent bike. Mine has coachlines painted by Meister Kluwer in his 89th year; he worked with the designer of the Locomotive Unisex Crossframe Deluxe in 1935 and the next year when the bike was put into series production worked on the line; Volkswagen a couple of years ago made a big search for the best European craftsman, and chose Meister Kluwer.

The late Herr Kalkhoff of Hannover, who put the Pedersen back into modern production, used to say that the 50mm Big Apple is almost as good as the 60mm, but the last photo of him I saw showed that he took the mudguards off his personal Pedersen to be able to fit 60mm Big Apples.

I have Maxxis Ikon 57-622 (or 29x2.20") and the
comfort and speed is amazing. Now that MTBs are
so fast I think the common guy should get
a MTB, rather than a road bike, if [s]he is
only getting one bike. It is more adventurous,
much better suited as a utility, and also more
creative, as you can put on lots of extra stuff
without having to really worry about making the
bike too heavy. It is more versatile, and fun.
Expensive road bikes will be for the cycling
elite is my prediction, that is with the whole
lycra and helmet gear, cycling almost
exclusively for the sake of cycling...


That's already the case in nations in Europe where cycling is the norm rather than the exception. All my Dutch commuter bikes have frames that can double as mountain bikes, and I go offroad on them when they're fitted with Schwalbe's Marathon Plus tyres, and my Trek Smover (from the Benelux Trek Design Office, not the American one) with electronic automatic gears and active suspension, designed as an ultra-luxe tourer for the finicky Dutch, is built on a frame that also did duty under their more expensive mountain bikes; it works well.

I don't have any lycra; I have rippling muscles instead, and in summer I tie a silk shirt made without any buttons under my navel. Generally speaking, I just cycle in what I'm wearing, which could be khakis or a pinstripe suit or an artist's leather smock which is great when it is cold and the wind hunches the lycra fashion queens over on their bikes with pained expressions on their faces. I developed my bike thoroughly for minimum service and zero cleaning, so it doesn't matter what I wear as it won't get dirty.

But I wear a helmet on all rides, first of all because the visor has saved my face on several occasions (I had plastic surgery in Switzerland after a motor racing incident many years ago in which I was burned, and I'm not planning on having any more), and secondly because I'm so fair-skinned that without a hat of some kind I burn even in the mild sun of Ireland; oddly enough, the easiest hat to control on a bicycle is a cycling helmet.

Andre Jute
Can't stand the clowns who think it essential for a cyclist to suffer, and to show he's suffering
 




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