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titanium recommendation?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 11th 05, 03:56 PM
Bob Terrwilliger
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Default titanium recommendation?

Hello there.

I am in the market for a new bike. My current bike is almost 20 years
old . I am interested in carbon or ti. and there seems to be a lot of
info on carbon bikes. But I am having a difficult time finding
recommendations of Ti bikes. Itc ould be because of my price range, I
dont know. I want to spend 1500 to 2300 or so. the less the better. I
dont need the best out there, I only ride for pleasure, about 100-200
miles a week, and I do a century or two each year.

Anyone out there have good or bad things to say about a particular Ti
bike they have or know about? any info would be helpful.
Ads
  #2  
Old March 11th 05, 04:53 PM
Arthur Harris
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Default

"Bob Terrwilliger" wrote:
I am in the market for a new bike. My current bike is almost 20 years
old .


Is that all? Mine is over 20 years old.

I am interested in carbon or ti. and there seems to be a lot of
info on carbon bikes. But I am having a difficult time finding
recommendations of Ti bikes.


I only ride for pleasure, about 100-200
miles a week, and I do a century or two each year.


Ti won't rust and an unpainted Ti bike won't scratch. Other than that, what
will a Ti bike do that your current bike won't? Not much. For a lot less
money, you could upgrade the drivetrain on your current bike and have the
best of both worlds. I happen to like the geometry, clearance, and look of
the '80s bikes much better than current models.

Art Harris


  #3  
Old March 11th 05, 05:04 PM
Bob Terrwilliger
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On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 10:53:43 -0500, "Arthur Harris"
wrote:



Ti won't rust and an unpainted Ti bike won't scratch. Other than that, what
will a Ti bike do that your current bike won't? Not much. For a lot less
money, you could upgrade the drivetrain on your current bike and have the
best of both worlds. I happen to like the geometry, clearance, and look of
the '80s bikes much better than current models.

Art Harris




Well. I guess I didnt give enough detail. My current bike is a trek
1000 aluminum. It is a 56cm. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs. I guess at the
time I got it, I liked it. I dont know if I grew ( I do know my belly
has) but the bike just doesnt seem to fit. It seems small. And it
beats me to death. I want something that will fit. and something that
will help smooth out the rodes just a tad. And something that will
last me another 15-20 years.
  #4  
Old March 11th 05, 05:05 PM
Ken
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Default

Bob Terrwilliger wrote in
:
I am in the market for a new bike. My current bike is almost 20 years
old . I am interested in carbon or ti. and there seems to be a lot of
info on carbon bikes.


A lot of the "info" you hear is really marketing hype to justify the lofty
prices of some of those bikes. Especially in the more moderate price ranges,
there is not much performance difference between bikes made from the
different popular materials. Some will handle differently from others, but
the differences are more because of geometry and tubing diameter and
componentry than because of frame material.
  #5  
Old March 11th 05, 05:07 PM
Bob M
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On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 16:04:05 GMT, Bob Terrwilliger
wrote:

On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 10:53:43 -0500, "Arthur Harris"
wrote:



Ti won't rust and an unpainted Ti bike won't scratch. Other than that,
what
will a Ti bike do that your current bike won't? Not much. For a lot less
money, you could upgrade the drivetrain on your current bike and have
the
best of both worlds. I happen to like the geometry, clearance, and look
of
the '80s bikes much better than current models.

Art Harris




Well. I guess I didnt give enough detail. My current bike is a trek
1000 aluminum. It is a 56cm. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs. I guess at the
time I got it, I liked it. I dont know if I grew ( I do know my belly
has) but the bike just doesnt seem to fit. It seems small. And it
beats me to death. I want something that will fit. and something that
will help smooth out the rodes just a tad. And something that will
last me another 15-20 years.


I have a Trek 1000 (or is mine a 1200?) and I now have a LeMond. The
LeMond is so much better than the Trek that it's amazing. For one, the
geometry is much better. Everything fits better and works better. It's
harder to find 7 speed stuff anymore, and I need the triple chainring
now. I can't go back to down-tube shifters, though I've kept my Trek for
indoors "riding".

--
Bob in CT
  #6  
Old March 11th 05, 05:47 PM
Bill H.
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Default

Yeah, look out for the hype, particularly about titanium. I just
pulled this quote off the Litespeed homepage: "Buy the TERAMO on Friday
morning, get it out of the box Friday night, get up Saturday morning
and start winning races!" If that's not bonafide BS, I don't know what
is. (http://www.litespeed.com/bikes/2005/teramo.aspx )

I know Bicycling magazine just came out with a buyers guide that might
be helpful. It would at least give you an idea of road bikes that are
in your price range, as well as what materials they're made of.

Personally, I tend to ignore the buyers guides because I'm both cheap
and reluctant to be swayed by a source that has to please its
advertisers. However, there may be a few nuggets of insight for folks
like you who are buying their first bike in a long time.

At the top end of your budget you could probably get a close to
top-of-the-line road bike that's both comfortable and very fast. But
for $1500 you could probably do well, too - all depends on how fast you
want to go and how much you just gotta have those new, fancy
components.

Comfort should be addressed by fit and frame material. If you specify
that you want to avoid aluminum frames, you should be able to find
something comfy. Some road riders are happy with an aluminum frame but
add a carbon fork for dampening the bumps, so that might be an option,
too.

Fit is diifferent for everyone so a trip to a well-stocked, quality
bike shop would probably be good, too. A good shop can look at your
size and weight and probably match you with something that'll work.

I'm a mountain biker riding an aluminum hardtail. For me the weight
benefit of aluminum over steel is worth the bumpier ride, but if I were
logging long hours in the saddle on a road bike, I would probably go
the carbon route if I had the money. If not, I'd go with maybe
aluminum frame/carbon fork option. YMMV, of course.

Good luck.

-Bill H.

  #7  
Old March 11th 05, 06:05 PM
Mike Jacoubowsky
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Default

Well. I guess I didnt give enough detail. My current bike is a trek
1000 aluminum. It is a 56cm. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs. I guess at the
time I got it, I liked it. I dont know if I grew ( I do know my belly
has) but the bike just doesnt seem to fit. It seems small. And it
beats me to death. I want something that will fit. and something that
will help smooth out the rodes just a tad. And something that will
last me another 15-20 years.


Sounds like you need a really good bike shop (particularly one that's great
on fit) more than any one particular frame material. As for the differences
between Ti, Carbon, Steel and Aluminum, best bet is to try them and see
which has that something that makes you want to ride more. You might want to
take a look at this article on our website-
www.ChainReaction.com/roadbiketestrides.htm before you head out; it's brand
& material neutral, and will give you a good idea what to look for.

--Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
www.ChainReactionBicycles.com


"Bob Terrwilliger" wrote in message
...
On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 10:53:43 -0500, "Arthur Harris"
wrote:



Ti won't rust and an unpainted Ti bike won't scratch. Other than that,
what
will a Ti bike do that your current bike won't? Not much. For a lot less
money, you could upgrade the drivetrain on your current bike and have the
best of both worlds. I happen to like the geometry, clearance, and look of
the '80s bikes much better than current models.

Art Harris




Well. I guess I didnt give enough detail. My current bike is a trek
1000 aluminum. It is a 56cm. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs. I guess at the
time I got it, I liked it. I dont know if I grew ( I do know my belly
has) but the bike just doesnt seem to fit. It seems small. And it
beats me to death. I want something that will fit. and something that
will help smooth out the rodes just a tad. And something that will
last me another 15-20 years.



  #8  
Old March 11th 05, 06:10 PM
jj
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Posts: n/a
Default

On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 16:04:05 GMT, Bob Terrwilliger
wrote:

On Fri, 11 Mar 2005 10:53:43 -0500, "Arthur Harris"
wrote:



Ti won't rust and an unpainted Ti bike won't scratch. Other than that, what
will a Ti bike do that your current bike won't? Not much. For a lot less
money, you could upgrade the drivetrain on your current bike and have the
best of both worlds. I happen to like the geometry, clearance, and look of
the '80s bikes much better than current models.

Art Harris




Well. I guess I didnt give enough detail. My current bike is a trek
1000 aluminum. It is a 56cm. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs. I guess at the
time I got it, I liked it. I dont know if I grew ( I do know my belly
has) but the bike just doesnt seem to fit. It seems small. And it
beats me to death. I want something that will fit. and something that
will help smooth out the rodes just a tad. And something that will
last me another 15-20 years.


Your bike is seriously undersized. I'm 5'9" and 30-31" inseam and the Trek
1000 56cm is just about perfect for my size, though I probably could ride
the next size up (58?).

Uh, I don't know about it 'beating you to death'. Mine gives a pretty
smooth ride, using 26mm tires, though my model has a carbon fork.

OTOH, if you have as much as $2300 bucks to spend, then I'd suggest getting
a bike in the 15-17lb range. Some people report they can ride routes they
found the hills too tough with a good carbon. If I were you, I'd test ride
both Ti and Carbon framed bikes in your price range and see which feels
best. I'm not sure how long a Carbon frame is supposed to last.

jj

  #9  
Old March 11th 05, 06:34 PM
Arthur Harris
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Posts: n/a
Default

"Bob Terrwilliger" wrote:

Well. I guess I didn't give enough detail. My current bike is a trek
1000 aluminum. It is a 56cm. I am 6'2" and 205 lbs.


OK, that's a good reason!

I guess at the
time I got it, I liked it. I dont know if I grew ( I do know my belly
has) but the bike just doesnt seem to fit. It seems small. And it
beats me to death. I want something that will fit. and something that
will help smooth out the rodes just a tad. And something that will
last me another 15-20 years.


You definitely need to get a properly sized bike. It's amazing that you're
doing the mileage you are with such a mismatched bike. I'm 6'3" / 195 pounds
and ride a 63 cm c-c frame. I don't think a light weight bike is going to
make much difference, but the right fit will.

As for frame materials, you might want to read Sheldon Brown's article on
the subject. See:

http://sheldonbrown.com/frame-materials.html

Tire width and inflation pressure have more effect on ride quality than
frame material. Make sure you get a bike that has enough clearance so that
your tire options aren't limited.

Good luck in your search.

Art Harris




  #10  
Old March 11th 05, 06:39 PM
Craig Brossman
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Default

Bob Terrwilliger wrote:
Hello there.

I am in the market for a new bike. My current bike is almost 20 years
old . I am interested in carbon or ti. and there seems to be a lot of
info on carbon bikes. But I am having a difficult time finding
recommendations of Ti bikes. Itc ould be because of my price range, I
dont know. I want to spend 1500 to 2300 or so. the less the better. I
dont need the best out there, I only ride for pleasure, about 100-200
miles a week, and I do a century or two each year.

Anyone out there have good or bad things to say about a particular Ti
bike they have or know about? any info would be helpful.


Mark Hickey, who frequents this website, is too good a guy to recommend
his own company, so I will.

For a enthusiastic rec. ride, I like the Habanero Ti bike. I purchased
one for my wife 2+ years ago and she loves it. She puts a few thousand
miles on a year.

If you are looking at spending several grand for a frame, then this may
not be for you. There are better finished Ti frames out there, but you
do pay for it. At $800 a frame, I feel Habanero is a very good deal and
was please with the service.

--
Craig Brossman, Durango Colorado
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