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  #1  
Old June 3rd 21, 11:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark cleary
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 51
Default New Tires

I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the wear indicators.. They were wore down to the end but not totally disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't be cheap with it?
Deacon mark
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  #2  
Old June 3rd 21, 11:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,196
Default New Tires

On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't be cheap with it?
Deacon mark

I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4 of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner very nearly as well as the GP5000.

But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim. The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.
  #3  
Old June 4th 21, 08:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Lou Holtman[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 826
Default New Tires

On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 12:05:19 AM UTC+2, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't be cheap with it?
Deacon mark


Life is too short to ride crappy tires. IMO the GP5000 are the best allround tire at the moment. Continental seems to be doing something right for more than a decade now. My gravel bike was delivered with WTB Riddler tires. They are good on gravel but I noticed that they suck on tarmac. My feeling was confirmed by RR measurements I found on the web. I put Continental Terra Speed tires on and that was a significant and very noticeable difference.. That Black Chili compound as Continental call it is some magical stuff.

Lou
  #4  
Old June 4th 21, 07:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 385
Default New Tires

Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark

I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.

But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim.
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.

Roger Merriman



  #5  
Old June 4th 21, 09:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,196
Default New Tires

On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 11:27:35 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark

I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.
But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim.
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.


My point wasn't that you could keep rolling but that you wouldn't lose control and go down. I've had both clincher and tubeless come off the rim. Really screws the rim up and luckily this never happened when I was using carbon rims.
  #6  
Old June 5th 21, 10:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 385
Default New Tires

Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 11:27:35 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark
I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.
But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim.
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.


My point wasn't that you could keep rolling but that you wouldn't lose
control and go down. I've had both clincher and tubeless come off the
rim. Really screws the rim up and luckily this never happened when I was using carbon rims.

Glued on or not a tire with a blown out side wall is probably asking to jam
in the fork, I agree the general reasoning which is that tubs can be run
flat, though as clinchers are apparently closed and overtaken in terms of
rolling. The argument not to use tubless + sealant is looking weaker.

Roger Merriman

  #7  
Old June 5th 21, 11:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,196
Default New Tires

On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 2:25:52 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 11:27:35 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark
I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.
But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim..
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.


My point wasn't that you could keep rolling but that you wouldn't lose
control and go down. I've had both clincher and tubeless come off the
rim. Really screws the rim up and luckily this never happened when I was using carbon rims.

Glued on or not a tire with a blown out side wall is probably asking to jam
in the fork, I agree the general reasoning which is that tubs can be run
flat, though as clinchers are apparently closed and overtaken in terms of
rolling. The argument not to use tubless + sealant is looking weaker.


I ran tubies for many years when that was the only good tires you could get and I never once saw a slashed sidewall. I had one of those plastic stacking boxes full of tubies and a couple of years ago I put an add in Craigslist free for the taking and a dozen people contacted me within hours. And these weren't even racing tires - they were training tires.
  #8  
Old June 7th 21, 05:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,196
Default New Tires

On Sunday, June 6, 2021 at 4:18:37 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 2:25:52 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 11:27:35 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark
I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.
But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim.
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.

My point wasn't that you could keep rolling but that you wouldn't lose
control and go down. I've had both clincher and tubeless come off the
rim. Really screws the rim up and luckily this never happened when I
was using carbon rims.

Glued on or not a tire with a blown out side wall is probably asking to jam
in the fork, I agree the general reasoning which is that tubs can be run
flat, though as clinchers are apparently closed and overtaken in terms of
rolling. The argument not to use tubless + sealant is looking weaker.


I ran tubies for many years when that was the only good tires you could
get and I never once saw a slashed sidewall. I had one of those plastic
stacking boxes full of tubies and a couple of years ago I put an add in
Craigslist free for the taking and a dozen people contacted me within
hours. And these weren't even racing tires - they were training tires.

I’ve slashed the odd MTB tires and quite a few Gravel tires, on road no.
Though being in various clubs etc, I’m aware it does happen.


The places I've done most of my gravel riding have not been in places I would not watch the trail for sharp objects so I wouldn't call my off-road experience pertinent to tire slashes. I was speaking about road tires when I said that I never had a tire sidewall slashed. Now I absolutely have had the tread location slashed to the point the tire couldn't be repaired. This is why I stopped using tubeless.
  #9  
Old June 7th 21, 10:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 385
Default New Tires

Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, June 6, 2021 at 4:18:37 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 2:25:52 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 11:27:35 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark
I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.
But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim.
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.

My point wasn't that you could keep rolling but that you wouldn't lose
control and go down. I've had both clincher and tubeless come off the
rim. Really screws the rim up and luckily this never happened when I
was using carbon rims.

Glued on or not a tire with a blown out side wall is probably asking to jam
in the fork, I agree the general reasoning which is that tubs can be run
flat, though as clinchers are apparently closed and overtaken in terms of
rolling. The argument not to use tubless + sealant is looking weaker.

I ran tubies for many years when that was the only good tires you could
get and I never once saw a slashed sidewall. I had one of those plastic
stacking boxes full of tubies and a couple of years ago I put an add in
Craigslist free for the taking and a dozen people contacted me within
hours. And these weren't even racing tires - they were training tires.

I’ve slashed the odd MTB tires and quite a few Gravel tires, on road no.
Though being in various clubs etc, I’m aware it does happen.


The places I've done most of my gravel riding have not been in places I
would not watch the trail for sharp objects so I wouldn't call my
off-road experience pertinent to tire slashes. I was speaking about road
tires when I said that I never had a tire sidewall slashed. Now I
absolutely have had the tread location slashed to the point the tire
couldn't be repaired. This is why I stopped using tubeless.

Most of the folks who have tire slashes etc, are roadies so generally
blowouts, some due to potholes and the like others maybe manufacturing
faults maybe mis use ie brake rub and such.

Road tires are fairly fragile so not difficult to do so, very few folks I
know have slashed MTB tires most folks are fundamentally over biked. And
even XC bikes are fairly capable on the technical stuff now.

Roger Merriman

  #10  
Old June 7th 21, 10:44 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,196
Default New Tires

On Monday, June 7, 2021 at 2:08:46 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Sunday, June 6, 2021 at 4:18:37 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 2:25:52 PM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Friday, June 4, 2021 at 11:27:35 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, June 3, 2021 at 3:05:19 PM UTC-7, Mark cleary wrote:
I have been using Conti GP 5000s regular tube required. I get huge
mileage out of them say 5000-6000. I put a new set on today because they
seem to be squared pretty good but I could still get a glimpse of the
wear indicators. They were wore down to the end but not totally
disappeared. I think I could have gotten more miles but the back tire
had a small sidewall type mark but nothing drastic or popping out.

Well I road the new ones and I sure could tell my cornering and handling
was better. Did I imagine this or should I have gotten more miles out of
the other tires. I guess my feeling it they are what meet the road don't
be cheap with it?
Deacon mark
I couldn't understand when you said that you were getting 5,000 miles on
those tires before since I could barely make 2,500, Using Michelin Pro4
of Vittoria Corsa G+ I get much better wear. I will say that the GP5000's
do corner a lot better and if you want very good wear and cornering the
Continental 4 Seasons are very good but very expensive. The Pro4's corner
very nearly as well as the GP5000.

Used to get, about 2k on various road tires, with the gravel tires get fair
bit less, maybe 1.5k.

Probably as gravel is abrasive plus the tires tend to be softer.
But yes, new GP5000's do corner remarkably better than worn one's that
have had the rubber age hardened. Though it used to be that you age
hardened some tires to get them to corner well. (GP4000's?) As soon as
the 5000's start getting flats it is time to replace them.

I do a lot of climbing on the tires and descending they get a combination
of high speed on lousy California pavement so perhaps this is why I would
wear them out so rapidly.

And like Joerg points out, do not use any tires with possible sidewall
blowout problems. That can lead to a tire being thrown off of the rim.
The reason that tubular tires were so popular in racing was because with
the tire glued onto the rim you couldn't throw the tire off.

If you blow a side wall on any tire, even a tubular that’s going to be game
over, a puncture no you can still keep on rolling, sidewall rip? Not so
sure I’d be confident you could.

My point wasn't that you could keep rolling but that you wouldn't lose
control and go down. I've had both clincher and tubeless come off the
rim. Really screws the rim up and luckily this never happened when I
was using carbon rims.

Glued on or not a tire with a blown out side wall is probably asking to jam
in the fork, I agree the general reasoning which is that tubs can be run
flat, though as clinchers are apparently closed and overtaken in terms of
rolling. The argument not to use tubless + sealant is looking weaker..

I ran tubies for many years when that was the only good tires you could
get and I never once saw a slashed sidewall. I had one of those plastic
stacking boxes full of tubies and a couple of years ago I put an add in
Craigslist free for the taking and a dozen people contacted me within
hours. And these weren't even racing tires - they were training tires..

I’ve slashed the odd MTB tires and quite a few Gravel tires, on road no.
Though being in various clubs etc, I’m aware it does happen.


The places I've done most of my gravel riding have not been in places I
would not watch the trail for sharp objects so I wouldn't call my
off-road experience pertinent to tire slashes. I was speaking about road
tires when I said that I never had a tire sidewall slashed. Now I
absolutely have had the tread location slashed to the point the tire
couldn't be repaired. This is why I stopped using tubeless.

Most of the folks who have tire slashes etc, are roadies so generally
blowouts, some due to potholes and the like others maybe manufacturing
faults maybe mis use ie brake rub and such.

Road tires are fairly fragile so not difficult to do so, very few folks I
know have slashed MTB tires most folks are fundamentally over biked. And
even XC bikes are fairly capable on the technical stuff now.


Having a slash on the road surface of the tire is completely different from having a slash on the sidewall which is the trouble that Joerg has. His route to work goes over a very rough rocky path if I understand him correctly..
 




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