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data on cut disc



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 12th 17, 12:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 869
Default data on cut disc

I tried to decipher all the data on a disc for
the angle grinder. Here is the incomplete
result:

#! /bin/zsh

# Symbols that seem to indicate:
# - use safety gloves, earmuffs, and goggles
# - for cutting only
# - read the manual
# - don't use a broken disc (?)
# - use to cut Inox or SS

# EN 12413
# a DIN standard: "Safety requirements for
# bonded abrasive products"

# 125*2.0/1.0*22.23
# outer_diameter*thickness/inner_diameter*thickness
# in mm

# MAX 80 m/s
# RPM 12200
# speed when disc is at 125 mm
# when disc is at 22.23, speed is 14 m/s!
# see program below to compute this

# AS 60 T INOX - BF
# INOX is again Inox/SS
# the rest I don't know

# Fe/S/Cl = 0.1%
# Some health related chemical property?

rpm2ms () {
local diam=$1 # e.g., 125 mm
local rpm=$2 # 12200 RPM
# ---------
# 80 m/s

local diam_in_m=$(( $diam / 1000.0 ))

local pi=3.14159265

local c=$(( $diam_in_m * $pi ))
local dist_per_min=$(( $c * $rpm ))
local dist_per_s=$(( $dist_per_min / 60.0 ))

printf 'm/s = %.0f\n' $dist_per_s
}

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
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  #2  
Old December 13th 17, 01:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default data on cut disc

On Tue, 12 Dec 2017 13:57:36 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

I tried to decipher all the data on a disc for
the angle grinder. Here is the incomplete
result:

#! /bin/zsh

# Symbols that seem to indicate:
# - use safety gloves, earmuffs, and goggles
# - for cutting only
# - read the manual
# - don't use a broken disc (?)
# - use to cut Inox or SS

# EN 12413
# a DIN standard: "Safety requirements for
# bonded abrasive products"

# 125*2.0/1.0*22.23
# outer_diameter*thickness/inner_diameter*thickness
# in mm

# MAX 80 m/s
# RPM 12200
# speed when disc is at 125 mm
# when disc is at 22.23, speed is 14 m/s!
# see program below to compute this

# AS 60 T INOX - BF
# INOX is again Inox/SS
# the rest I don't know

# Fe/S/Cl = 0.1%
# Some health related chemical property?

rpm2ms () {
local diam=$1 # e.g., 125 mm
local rpm=$2 # 12200 RPM
# ---------
# 80 m/s

local diam_in_m=$(( $diam / 1000.0 ))

local pi=3.14159265

local c=$(( $diam_in_m * $pi ))
local dist_per_min=$(( $c * $rpm ))
local dist_per_s=$(( $dist_per_min / 60.0 ))

printf 'm/s = %.0f\n' $dist_per_s
}


You've got 4" x 2mm cut off disks :-)

In the last few years I have switched to 4" x 1mm cutting wheels. They
are, I believe, some sort of epoxy material impregnated with cutting
abrasive. They cut very noticeably faster then the 2mm wheels and when
they do break the don't shatter and explode all over the place.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #3  
Old December 13th 17, 08:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 230
Default data on cut disc

On Tuesday, December 12, 2017 at 1:57:41 PM UTC+1, Emanuel Berg wrote:
I tried to decipher all the data on a disc for
the angle grinder. Here is the incomplete
result:

#! /bin/zsh

# Symbols that seem to indicate:
# - use safety gloves, earmuffs, and goggles
# - for cutting only
# - read the manual
# - don't use a broken disc (?)
# - use to cut Inox or SS

# EN 12413
# a DIN standard: "Safety requirements for
# bonded abrasive products"

# 125*2.0/1.0*22.23
# outer_diameter*thickness/inner_diameter*thickness
# in mm

# MAX 80 m/s
# RPM 12200
# speed when disc is at 125 mm
# when disc is at 22.23, speed is 14 m/s!
# see program below to compute this

# AS 60 T INOX - BF
# INOX is again Inox/SS
# the rest I don't know

# Fe/S/Cl = 0.1%
# Some health related chemical property?

rpm2ms () {
local diam=$1 # e.g., 125 mm
local rpm=$2 # 12200 RPM
# ---------
# 80 m/s

local diam_in_m=$(( $diam / 1000.0 ))

local pi=3.14159265

local c=$(( $diam_in_m * $pi ))
local dist_per_min=$(( $c * $rpm ))
local dist_per_s=$(( $dist_per_min / 60.0 ))

printf 'm/s = %.0f\n' $dist_per_s
}

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


What is next? Your chainsaw?

Lou
  #4  
Old December 13th 17, 10:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 869
Default data on cut disc

Lou wrote:

What is next? Your chainsaw?


I actually have 2-3 of those! Or rather they
belong to the organization. Mostly it is the
older guys tho who are "knife geeks" including
the chainsaw. Besides I have a sawhorse and
sawing is one (of many) manual job I don't
dislike, but of course if it gets too much it
isn't pleasant or interesting anymore.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #5  
Old December 13th 17, 06:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,801
Default data on cut disc

On Wed, 13 Dec 2017 11:53:58 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Lou wrote:

What is next? Your chainsaw?


I actually have 2-3 of those! Or rather they
belong to the organization. Mostly it is the
older guys tho who are "knife geeks" including
the chainsaw. Besides I have a sawhorse and
sawing is one (of many) manual job I don't
dislike, but of course if it gets too much it
isn't pleasant or interesting anymore.


Organization? I was wondering who was funding your efforts to improve
bicycle lock cutting angle grinders.

Did someone say chainsaw? I don't think a chain saw would be suitable
for the cutting bicycle locks, but you're welcome to try.
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/chainsaw/slides/chain-saws-02.html
One can never have enough chain saws.

Also, I'm currently into knife sharpening (with a bottom of the line
Harbor Freight 1x30" belt sander and collection of stones). I'm
collecting the equipment I need to make my own custom knives, but so
far have only make one mediocre knife (from a kit).



--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #6  
Old December 13th 17, 08:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,241
Default data on cut disc

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
:On Wed, 13 Dec 2017 11:53:58 +0100, Emanuel Berg
:wrote:

:Lou wrote:
:
: What is next? Your chainsaw?

:I actually have 2-3 of those! Or rather they
:belong to the organization. Mostly it is the
:older guys tho who are "knife geeks" including
:the chainsaw. Besides I have a sawhorse and
:sawing is one (of many) manual job I don't
:dislike, but of course if it gets too much it
:isn't pleasant or interesting anymore.

:Organization? I was wondering who was funding your efforts to improve
:bicycle lock cutting angle grinders.

id someone say chainsaw? I don't think a chain saw would be suitable
:for the cutting bicycle locks, but you're welcome to try.
:http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/chainsaw/slides/chain-saws-02.html
:One can never have enough chain saws.

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/20/d3/01/2...and-hobbes.jpg

--
sig 119
  #7  
Old December 13th 17, 08:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 869
Default data on cut disc

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Did someone say chainsaw? I don't think
a chain saw would be suitable for the cutting
bicycle locks, but you're welcome to try.
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/chainsaw/slides/chain-saws-02.html
One can never have enough chain saws.


Wow, nice photo!

I have also used a Stihl (first row from the
top) that was much smaller, bout half the size,
and battery powered.

Husqvarna (second row) should be Swedish by the
way but nowadays probably all international and
then made in the PRC so what does it all
mean anymore.

Also, I'm currently into knife sharpening
(with a bottom of the line Harbor Freight
1x30" belt sander and collection of stones).
I'm collecting the equipment I need to make
my own custom knives, but so far have only
make one mediocre knife (from a kit).


Ha ha, cool!

I now live in a wood house, so I thought I'd
get knives and start practising throwing
against the wall. Problem is there are a bunch
of mildly crazy people here as well and I don't
know how they would react if I picked that up.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #8  
Old December 13th 17, 09:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default data on cut disc

On 12/13/2017 2:12 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Did someone say chainsaw? I don't think
a chain saw would be suitable for the cutting
bicycle locks, but you're welcome to try.
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/chainsaw/slides/chain-saws-02.html
One can never have enough chain saws.


Wow, nice photo!

I have also used a Stihl (first row from the
top) that was much smaller, bout half the size,
and battery powered.

Husqvarna (second row) should be Swedish by the
way but nowadays probably all international and
then made in the PRC so what does it all
mean anymore.

Also, I'm currently into knife sharpening
(with a bottom of the line Harbor Freight
1x30" belt sander and collection of stones).
I'm collecting the equipment I need to make
my own custom knives, but so far have only
make one mediocre knife (from a kit).


Ha ha, cool!

I now live in a wood house, so I thought I'd
get knives and start practising throwing
against the wall. Problem is there are a bunch
of mildly crazy people here as well and I don't
know how they would react if I picked that up.


"hope is not a plan"

If you're living with crazy people, developing a working
relationship with throwing knives might be a good idea.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #9  
Old December 15th 17, 07:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,801
Default data on cut disc

On Wed, 13 Dec 2017 21:12:11 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Did someone say chainsaw? I don't think
a chain saw would be suitable for the cutting
bicycle locks, but you're welcome to try.
http://802.11junk.com/jeffl/pics/chainsaw/slides/chain-saws-02.html
One can never have enough chain saws.


Wow, nice photo!


Thanks. I had far too many saws (and bicycles). Time to downsize.
The three Homelite Super E-Z saws in the foreground are rather old.
16:1 mix and no chain brake. However, they are somewhat of a
collectors item due to the compression release feature. So, I traded
the local handyman all 3 Homelite saws for some work on my property.

I have also used a Stihl (first row from the
top) that was much smaller, bout half the size,
and battery powered.


The Stihl battery powered saws:
https://www.stihlusa.com/products/chain-saws/battery-saws/
are really nice. I've played with one and like it for limbing and
light work. Not having to mess with gas, oil, starting, and fuel
system maintenance is well worth it. Stihl probably would not have
offered a battery operated saw were it not for the growing number of
chain saw emission regulations. It's unlikely that a 2 cycle engine
will pass various proposed draconian emission regulations. It would
require either a 4 cycle engine, which tends to be underpowered, or an
electric motor. I have no idea which way the industry and customers
will favor.

Husqvarna (second row) should be Swedish by the
way but nowadays probably all international and
then made in the PRC so what does it all
mean anymore.


The two Husqvarna saws are coincidentally an oddity. The 136 and 41
look and are almost identical. The only difference I could find was
the older 136 was made entirely in Germany, while the 41 was partly
made by Poulon and probably has some components that were made in
China:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Husqvarna_Group#Brands

Higher end Stihl products, that are sold in the USA, are mostly made
in the USA:
https://www.b4usa.com/stihl-inc/
However, the MS-180 in the photo was made in China:
http://blog.stihl.com/stihl-worldwide/2013/11/stihl-china-quality-made-stihl/
Incidentally, I replaced the rather narrow width chain and bar on the
MS-180 with a wider and more standard size chain. Cuts much better
now and needs to be sharpened less often:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/192054090789

Also, I'm currently into knife sharpening
(with a bottom of the line Harbor Freight
1x30" belt sander and collection of stones).
I'm collecting the equipment I need to make
my own custom knives, but so far have only
make one mediocre knife (from a kit).


Ha ha, cool!

I now live in a wood house, so I thought I'd
get knives and start practising throwing
against the wall. Problem is there are a bunch
of mildly crazy people here as well and I don't
know how they would react if I picked that up.


I have a similar problem with friends and neighbors. I've found that
offering to sharpen their kitchen knives converts suspicious neighbors
into more tolerant neighbors. I also got a few extra points by
sharpening some Norelco shaver blades. Better neighborhood public
relations through bribery.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 




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