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  #1  
Old March 18th 18, 11:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 906
Default milling machine

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE



--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
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  #2  
Old March 19th 18, 12:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:35:20 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE



The beginning scenes - no loose clothing, no rings or wris****ch, etc.
is good advice. I once worked with a guy that caught a ring on
something when he jumped down out of the bomb bay and tore the skin
off the back of his finger. Just pealed off a strip all the way from
the base of his finger to the fingernail. An Electrician, working on
the same airplane shorted out the main battery bank with his wedding
ring. Melted the gold ring right off his finger (that didn't do the
finger any good either)

As a young Airman those experiences convinced me that jewelry and
working are a poor combination and even today I automatically remove
rings and watches when going to work.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #3  
Old March 19th 18, 12:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 906
Default milling machine

John B. wrote:

The beginning scenes - no loose clothing, no
rings or wris****ch, etc. is good advice.
I once worked with a guy that caught a ring
on something when he jumped down out of the
bomb bay and tore the skin off the back of
his finger. Just pealed off a strip all the
way from the base of his finger to the
fingernail. An Electrician, working on the
same airplane shorted out the main battery
bank with his wedding ring. Melted the gold
ring right off his finger (that didn't do the
finger any good either)

As a young Airman those experiences convinced
me that jewelry and working are a poor
combination and even today I automatically
remove rings and watches when going to work.


Yep. I like the name of the brand - Luna -
because I can't think of anything cooler than
to have your own base on the Moon Well,
maybe a time machine/battlecruiser/science
vessel/spaceship all in one...

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #4  
Old March 19th 18, 02:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,044
Default milling machine

On 3/18/2018 8:08 PM, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:35:20 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE



The beginning scenes - no loose clothing, no rings or wris****ch, etc.
is good advice. I once worked with a guy that caught a ring on
something when he jumped down out of the bomb bay and tore the skin
off the back of his finger. Just pealed off a strip all the way from
the base of his finger to the fingernail. An Electrician, working on
the same airplane shorted out the main battery bank with his wedding
ring. Melted the gold ring right off his finger (that didn't do the
finger any good either)

As a young Airman those experiences convinced me that jewelry and
working are a poor combination and even today I automatically remove
rings and watches when going to work.


I know of a trade school that had its carpentry students building a
house, that the school later sold as a fund raiser.

I was told that one long-haired student was on the 2nd floor, drilling
holes for wiring through the studs in the naked stud walls. He leaned
over as he drilled, and his long hair wrapped around the chuck of the
drill. The drill pulled his head down fast enough that he knocked his
head on the drill, then fell through the open stud space. He was rescued
while hanging by his hair about 8 feet above the ground.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #5  
Old March 19th 18, 04:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,826
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:35:20 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE


A good choice for doing what?

If you're thinking of buying a mill, either get one with servo drives,
or one that is easily converted to CNC by adding servo drives. (I
don't like steppers). CNC makes things much easier.

That also means ball screws for the table. If the machine is sloppy
when operated manually, it will still be sloppy when driven by a
computah.

As for the safety lecture, it's all good advice. I would roll up my
sleeves, or use a velcro strap to keep them in place. The only real
accident I can recall was getting a sleeve caught in an industrial
sewing machine. Also, if you're using coolant, you'll never be able
to keep the machines as clean as the one in the video.



--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #6  
Old March 19th 18, 04:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,826
Default milling machine

On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 21:14:30 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

If you're thinking of buying a mill, either get one with servo drives,
or one that is easily converted to CNC by adding servo drives. (I
don't like steppers). CNC makes things much easier.


I'm currently helping a friend with this CNC mill conversion:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/CNC-conversion/index.html

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #7  
Old March 19th 18, 05:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default milling machine

On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 22:36:32 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 3/18/2018 8:08 PM, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:35:20 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE



The beginning scenes - no loose clothing, no rings or wris****ch, etc.
is good advice. I once worked with a guy that caught a ring on
something when he jumped down out of the bomb bay and tore the skin
off the back of his finger. Just pealed off a strip all the way from
the base of his finger to the fingernail. An Electrician, working on
the same airplane shorted out the main battery bank with his wedding
ring. Melted the gold ring right off his finger (that didn't do the
finger any good either)

As a young Airman those experiences convinced me that jewelry and
working are a poor combination and even today I automatically remove
rings and watches when going to work.


I know of a trade school that had its carpentry students building a
house, that the school later sold as a fund raiser.

I was told that one long-haired student was on the 2nd floor, drilling
holes for wiring through the studs in the naked stud walls. He leaned
over as he drilled, and his long hair wrapped around the chuck of the
drill. The drill pulled his head down fast enough that he knocked his
head on the drill, then fell through the open stud space. He was rescued
while hanging by his hair about 8 feet above the ground.


Depending on how much hair the drill grabbed I would have expected to
find the guy on the floor with a nasty red place on his scalp where
the hair got pulled out :-)

When I was in the A.F. they were almost fanatical about safety. You
could actually be demoted for failure to comply with the safety
manual. When I retired and went to work for a civilian company I found
that while they gave lip service to safety they were actually far more
lax then the A.F.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #8  
Old March 19th 18, 05:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default milling machine

On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 21:14:30 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 00:35:20 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

What do you think guys, maybe this one is
a good choice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jML8nVSntuE


A good choice for doing what?

If you're thinking of buying a mill, either get one with servo drives,
or one that is easily converted to CNC by adding servo drives. (I
don't like steppers). CNC makes things much easier.

That also means ball screws for the table. If the machine is sloppy
when operated manually, it will still be sloppy when driven by a
computah.


Out of curiosity what do you reckon it will cost to convert a milling
machine to CNC? Replacing the feed screws with ball screws, installing
servos or stepper motors, the computer installation, etc.?


As for the safety lecture, it's all good advice. I would roll up my
sleeves, or use a velcro strap to keep them in place. The only real
accident I can recall was getting a sleeve caught in an industrial
sewing machine. Also, if you're using coolant, you'll never be able
to keep the machines as clean as the one in the video.

--
Cheers,

John B.

  #9  
Old March 19th 18, 06:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,826
Default milling machine

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 12:47:21 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Out of curiosity what do you reckon it will cost to convert a milling
machine to CNC? Replacing the feed screws with ball screws, installing
servos or stepper motors, the computer installation, etc.?


Some photos:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/CNC-conversion/index.html

Badly half done web page:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/CNC%20Conversion%20Project/CNC.html

Link to docs, manuals, and details:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1B_FtnU1LHjr0O7aoJoUVwbGOQRujyNnC?usp=sharing

I can get you the exact specs, prices, and sources (later) when I find
where I buried my notebooks.

There are kits available that are essentially plug and play
conversions for well known mills, such as Bridgeports. If the mill
doesn't have ball screws, you'll need a conversion kit for $1,000 to
$1,500. The Shizuoka ST-N mill already has ball screws, so this was
not needed.

So far, we have about $1,600 into the controller, 3 drivers, 3 servos,
and 3 added servo brakes. The servos are the biggest available.

We only have one phase 220VAC power available, so add in a phase
converter for the spindle motor for about $150 to $400 depending on
power.

We also need to add 5 inductive limit switches at about $20/ea.

I get the fun job of rewiring the machine with new wires, flex
conduit, relays, and sockets (coolant, tool changer, etc) for about
$15/ea. My guess is about 8 relays and who knows how much wire.

I'm also adding a 24V 6A DC power supply to run the brakes and relays.
I have some of these, but my guess is about $50 for a decent switcher.

Grand total should be under $2,500. Prior to going the do it thyself
route, we received estimates for complete systems, that started at
about $10,000.

We made a huge mistake by purchasing the various components from
different vendors in order to save money. Despite my demands that the
owner obtain the manuals on everything before purchasing, the owner
decided he was in a hurry. All the manuals are in either Chinese or a
bad Google translation of Chinese into English.

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #10  
Old March 19th 18, 07:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,967
Default milling machine

On Sun, 18 Mar 2018 23:34:39 -0700, Jeff Liebermann
wrote:

On Mon, 19 Mar 2018 12:47:21 +0700, John B.
wrote:

Out of curiosity what do you reckon it will cost to convert a milling
machine to CNC? Replacing the feed screws with ball screws, installing
servos or stepper motors, the computer installation, etc.?


Some photos:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/CNC-conversion/index.html

Badly half done web page:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/CNC%20Conversion%20Project/CNC.html

Link to docs, manuals, and details:
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1B_FtnU1LHjr0O7aoJoUVwbGOQRujyNnC?usp=sharing

I can get you the exact specs, prices, and sources (later) when I find
where I buried my notebooks.

There are kits available that are essentially plug and play
conversions for well known mills, such as Bridgeports. If the mill
doesn't have ball screws, you'll need a conversion kit for $1,000 to
$1,500. The Shizuoka ST-N mill already has ball screws, so this was
not needed.

So far, we have about $1,600 into the controller, 3 drivers, 3 servos,
and 3 added servo brakes. The servos are the biggest available.

We only have one phase 220VAC power available, so add in a phase
converter for the spindle motor for about $150 to $400 depending on
power.

We also need to add 5 inductive limit switches at about $20/ea.

I get the fun job of rewiring the machine with new wires, flex
conduit, relays, and sockets (coolant, tool changer, etc) for about
$15/ea. My guess is about 8 relays and who knows how much wire.

I'm also adding a 24V 6A DC power supply to run the brakes and relays.
I have some of these, but my guess is about $50 for a decent switcher.

Grand total should be under $2,500. Prior to going the do it thyself
route, we received estimates for complete systems, that started at
about $10,000.

We made a huge mistake by purchasing the various components from
different vendors in order to save money. Despite my demands that the
owner obtain the manuals on everything before purchasing, the owner
decided he was in a hurry. All the manuals are in either Chinese or a
bad Google translation of Chinese into English.


To be honest I can't think of anything I ever did on a horizontal or
vertical milling machine that would have benefited by having CNC :-)

A lathe, yes, if only turning the balls to put on the ends of a vise
handle, but all the milling I can remember doing was pretty much
straight cuts.

What does the guy plan on doing with the mill?
--
Cheers,

John B.

 




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