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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #221  
Old May 24th 15, 02:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,109
Default AG: Freezing Bottles


If you frequently freeze water in a plastic container that wasn't
designed for it, the expansion of the ice will sooner or later crack
the container at the mold mark. You can get around this by filling a
bottle a little at a time, tipping the bottle to maximize the surface
area of the water when you put it into the freezer. Tipping also
keeps the ice from getting a square push.

Freezing bottles became much easier after I found a valve-cap that
fits the bottles that "spring water" comes in. Disposable bottles
also allow me to build up a stock of frozen beverage without buying a
lot of California Springs bottles.

If a bottle which had been entirely frozen now has a few drops of
water in it, pour them out on the ground. They will contain every
molecule of salt that was in the water.



--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGESEW/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
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  #222  
Old May 24th 15, 04:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 5,966
Default AG: Freezing Bottles

On 5/23/2015 9:59 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

If you frequently freeze water in a plastic container that wasn't
designed for it, the expansion of the ice will sooner or later crack
the container at the mold mark. You can get around this by filling a
bottle a little at a time, tipping the bottle to maximize the surface
area of the water when you put it into the freezer. Tipping also
keeps the ice from getting a square push.

Freezing bottles became much easier after I found a valve-cap that
fits the bottles that "spring water" comes in. Disposable bottles
also allow me to build up a stock of frozen beverage without buying a
lot of California Springs bottles.

If a bottle which had been entirely frozen now has a few drops of
water in it, pour them out on the ground. They will contain every
molecule of salt that was in the water.


Nice tip, except I'm the guy who purposely _adds_ a little salt to his
water! I think it helps prevent leg cramps.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #223  
Old May 31st 15, 04:57 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,109
Default AG: Four feet



I'm always seeing reminders that cars should give bicycles four feet
of clearance when overtaking, but I seldom see a reminder that
bicycles should give cars four feet of clearance.

Ample clearance is particularly important when the car is parked. A
moving car seldom throws open a door, nicks the end of your handlebar,
and steers the bike out from under you, whereupon you fall under the
wheels of a bus.

Example:

There is, not too far from my house, a street with two lanes exactly
wide enough for cars, and two bike lanes that look to be about a yard
wide.

(I haven't actually measured the bike lanes in this stretch. About
half a mile further out, I measured the other bike lane at sixty-nine
inches including two four-inch white stripes in one place, and
fifty-four (again including stripes) in another.)

Three observations: An overtaking car cannot pass a bicycle in the
bike lane without taking part of the oncoming lane. Traffic in the
oncoming lane is nearly continuous. Good pavement extends well beyond
the edge of the "bike lane".

When eastbound on this stretch of road, I ride just outside the bike
lane.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


  #224  
Old June 7th 15, 03:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,109
Default AG: Roadside Repairs


When you take the cap off a valve, put it into your pocket. If you
forget to put it back on, at least you'll have it with you.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #225  
Old June 15th 15, 12:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,109
Default AG: Getting chain grease off the calf


This post is late because I was too tired to write when I came home
yesterday -- so tired that I woke up with a gray spot on my calf this
morning.

Well, I forgot the chain grease when I was showering partly because
that was only the second time I didn't wear long pants this spring,
and partly because it rained heavily during the last half mile of the
ride and I was in a big hurry to get my clothes off.

But that gives me a topic: when you lather up the black spot and
rinse it off, it turns gray -- then you have to scrub really hard to
get the rest of it off and your calf is red instead of black.

Well, it's that way for me. Younger folks with greasier skin might
shed the dirt more easily.

Go to a beauty-supply store and buy one of the hard plastic sponges
that they sell as cheap substitutes for pumice stones. Mine is
labeled "pumice contour" and has a logo of a weightlifter named "Mr.
Pumice."

After washing your leg, rub soap on the gray spot and rub soap on the
wet "pumice". One or two light strokes and poof! the grease is gone,
with no skin irritation.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #226  
Old June 15th 15, 11:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Getting chain grease off the calf

On Sun, 14 Jun 2015 20:13:02 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


This post is late because I was too tired to write when I came home
yesterday -- so tired that I woke up with a gray spot on my calf this
morning.

Well, I forgot the chain grease when I was showering partly because
that was only the second time I didn't wear long pants this spring,
and partly because it rained heavily during the last half mile of the
ride and I was in a big hurry to get my clothes off.

But that gives me a topic: when you lather up the black spot and
rinse it off, it turns gray -- then you have to scrub really hard to
get the rest of it off and your calf is red instead of black.

Well, it's that way for me. Younger folks with greasier skin might
shed the dirt more easily.

Go to a beauty-supply store and buy one of the hard plastic sponges
that they sell as cheap substitutes for pumice stones. Mine is
labeled "pumice contour" and has a logo of a weightlifter named "Mr.
Pumice."

After washing your leg, rub soap on the gray spot and rub soap on the
wet "pumice". One or two light strokes and poof! the grease is gone,
with no skin irritation.



Those "grease spots" are a combination of oil, or grease, and dirt.
Gasoline removes them quite easily :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #227  
Old June 15th 15, 12:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Jim
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Posts: 5
Default AG: Getting chain grease off the calf

In article , John B.
wrote:

On Sun, 14 Jun 2015 20:13:02 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


This post is late because I was too tired to write when I came home
yesterday -- so tired that I woke up with a gray spot on my calf this
morning.

Well, I forgot the chain grease when I was showering partly because
that was only the second time I didn't wear long pants this spring,
and partly because it rained heavily during the last half mile of the
ride and I was in a big hurry to get my clothes off.


I use the spray on sun-screen to remove chain grease. Works well (for
some reason)

--
Jim
  #228  
Old June 15th 15, 03:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,966
Default AG: Getting chain grease off the calf

On 6/15/2015 7:53 AM, Jim wrote:
In article , John B.
wrote:

On Sun, 14 Jun 2015 20:13:02 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


This post is late because I was too tired to write when I came home
yesterday -- so tired that I woke up with a gray spot on my calf this
morning.

Well, I forgot the chain grease when I was showering partly because
that was only the second time I didn't wear long pants this spring,
and partly because it rained heavily during the last half mile of the
ride and I was in a big hurry to get my clothes off.


I use the spray on sun-screen to remove chain grease. Works well (for
some reason)


On a recent club ride, someone demonstrated that standard
cream-in-a-tube sunscreen also works well.

I wax my chains, so I don't have much need for these tricks.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #229  
Old June 21st 15, 04:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,109
Default AG: Water


Never pass a water fountain without topping off your bottles, even if
you've taken only a few sips since the last fountain.

Always taste water before mixing it with good water.

Tasting first doesn't always help. When touring Saratoga, I stopped
at a mineral spring, noted that the water tasted better than what I'd
brought from the hotel, emptied my bottles and refilled them. Then
half an hour later, when the water had warmed to the ambient
temperature . . .


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #230  
Old June 21st 15, 11:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Water

On Sun, 21 Jun 2015 00:18:12 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:


Never pass a water fountain without topping off your bottles, even if
you've taken only a few sips since the last fountain.

Always taste water before mixing it with good water.

Tasting first doesn't always help. When touring Saratoga, I stopped
at a mineral spring, noted that the water tasted better than what I'd
brought from the hotel, emptied my bottles and refilled them. Then
half an hour later, when the water had warmed to the ambient
temperature . . .


When out and about I always drink bottled water as sometimes "local
water", even though it may be sanitary, can contain chemicals that
upset one's stomach.
--
cheers,

John B.

 




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