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  #1  
Old May 9th 12, 09:40 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Judith[_4_]
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Posts: 11,000
Default Traffic Cops




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night - thought to be
involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no street
lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


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  #2  
Old May 10th 12, 05:25 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Simon Mason
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Posts: 4,174
Default Giro d'Italia Stage 5: Cav the daddy as he wins in Fano in front of girlfriend and daughter

QUOTE:
She won't have known much about it, but on a landmark day for his family,
Mark Cavedish's daughter Delilah was present at the end of a race won by her
father for the first ever time. The world champion, still battered and
bruised from that crash on Monday's Stage 3, held off former HTC Highroad
team mate Matt Goss of Orica GreenEdge to take the sprint in Fano, with
Daniele Bennati of RadioShack-Nissan third. Ramunas Navardauskas of
Garmin-Barracuda retains the overall lead.

With a little over 3km still to ride, Lotto-Belisol's Adam Hansen tried to
get clear of the peloton, but with Team Sky leading the bunch, the
Australian's attack was doomed to failure the moment it began, and it was
Team Sky's Ian Stannard who led the race under the flamme rouge before
Geraint Thomas, the final link in the leadout chain, set Cavendish up for
the ninth Giro stage win of his career.

The stage took the peloton 209km from Modena along the straight-as-an-arrow
historic Roman road, the Via Emilia, to Fano on the Adriatic coast with a
couple of excursions inland towards the end to tackle some short ascents.

Early on, four riders got away - the Lotto Belisol pair of Oliver Kaisen,
also in a break on Sunday's Stage 2, and Brian Bulgac, plus Pier Paolo De
Negri of Farnese Vini-ISD Neri and Alessandro De Marchi from Androni
Giocattoli-Venezuela.

With 60km left to ride, the quartet had an advantage of five and a half
minutes over the peloton, a slight tailwind enabling them to clip along at a
brisk 44km an hour, but their lead tumbled after that as a number of teams
looking to set their men up for the sprint today led the chase.

By the time the race entered its closing 25km following the only categorised
climb of the day, De Marchi was left alone out front but he too was swept
up, the peloton splitting then regrouping as at headed up and down those
short ascents reminiscent of the capi of Milan-San Remo.

Some riders had been shelled out the back as the stage headed into the
flatter terrain of the final 10 kilometres, but Cavendish was present
towards the front of the race as the sprinters' teams started to rack up the
pace.

Big names missing, however, included Garmin-Barracuda's Tyler Farrar, who
had been lying second overall after his team dominated yesterday's team time
tria in Verona, as well as BMC Racing's Thor Hushovd.

Today was the third road stage of this year's race and Hushovd's team mate
Taylor Phinney, who lost the maglia rosa to Navardauskas yesterday as he
struggled with the after-effects of the Stage 3 pile-up in Horsens,
maintained his unfortunate record of crashing in each of them.

Off the back of the peloton today with 30km still to ride after that chute
shortly beforehand, the 21-year-old American, today sporting the best young
rider's white jersey, angrily gestured at the RadioShack team car as it
swept past him on an ascent, its wing mirror almost clipping him.

This morning, on a stage where riders were due to sign on at the house where
motor racing legend Enzo Ferrari was born, the rider held responsible for
that stack 200 metres from the end of Monday's Stage 3, Roberto Ferrari of
Androni Giocattoli-Venezuela, had been due to apologise publicly to
Cavendish and Phinney for the injuries they received in that incident.

Speaking to host broadcaster RAI at the start, however, Ferrari revealed
that Cavendish did not want a public apology and instead wanted to meet with
him in private. There was more welcome company for Cavendish at the end of
today's stage, however - girlfriend Peta Todd was waiting with their
month-old daughter Delilah, who had even been issued with her own
accreditation badge by organisers.

http://road.cc/content/news/57985-gi...d-and-daughter

--
Simon Mason

  #3  
Old May 10th 12, 05:45 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Dave - Cyclists VOR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,703
Default Numb-nuts Mason changes the subject again.

On 10/05/2012 17:25, Simon Mason wrote:
QUOTE:
She won't have known much about it, but on a landmark day for his
family, Mark Cavedish's daughter Delilah was present at the end of a
race won by her father for the first ever time. The world champion,
still battered and bruised from that crash on Monday's Stage 3, held off
former HTC Highroad team mate Matt Goss of Orica GreenEdge to take the
sprint in Fano, with Daniele Bennati of RadioShack-Nissan third. Ramunas
Navardauskas of Garmin-Barracuda retains the overall lead.

With a little over 3km still to ride, Lotto-Belisol's Adam Hansen tried
to get clear of the peloton, but with Team Sky leading the bunch, the
Australian's attack was doomed to failure the moment it began, and it
was Team Sky's Ian Stannard who led the race under the flamme rouge
before Geraint Thomas, the final link in the leadout chain, set
Cavendish up for the ninth Giro stage win of his career.

The stage took the peloton 209km from Modena along the
straight-as-an-arrow historic Roman road, the Via Emilia, to Fano on the
Adriatic coast with a couple of excursions inland towards the end to
tackle some short ascents.

Early on, four riders got away - the Lotto Belisol pair of Oliver
Kaisen, also in a break on Sunday's Stage 2, and Brian Bulgac, plus Pier
Paolo De Negri of Farnese Vini-ISD Neri and Alessandro De Marchi from
Androni Giocattoli-Venezuela.

With 60km left to ride, the quartet had an advantage of five and a half
minutes over the peloton, a slight tailwind enabling them to clip along
at a brisk 44km an hour, but their lead tumbled after that as a number
of teams looking to set their men up for the sprint today led the chase.

By the time the race entered its closing 25km following the only
categorised climb of the day, De Marchi was left alone out front but he
too was swept up, the peloton splitting then regrouping as at headed up
and down those short ascents reminiscent of the capi of Milan-San Remo.

Some riders had been shelled out the back as the stage headed into the
flatter terrain of the final 10 kilometres, but Cavendish was present
towards the front of the race as the sprinters' teams started to rack up
the pace.

Big names missing, however, included Garmin-Barracuda's Tyler Farrar,
who had been lying second overall after his team dominated yesterday's
team time tria in Verona, as well as BMC Racing's Thor Hushovd.

Today was the third road stage of this year's race and Hushovd's team
mate Taylor Phinney, who lost the maglia rosa to Navardauskas yesterday
as he struggled with the after-effects of the Stage 3 pile-up in
Horsens, maintained his unfortunate record of crashing in each of them.

Off the back of the peloton today with 30km still to ride after that
chute shortly beforehand, the 21-year-old American, today sporting the
best young rider's white jersey, angrily gestured at the RadioShack team
car as it swept past him on an ascent, its wing mirror almost clipping him.

This morning, on a stage where riders were due to sign on at the house
where motor racing legend Enzo Ferrari was born, the rider held
responsible for that stack 200 metres from the end of Monday's Stage 3,
Roberto Ferrari of Androni Giocattoli-Venezuela, had been due to
apologise publicly to Cavendish and Phinney for the injuries they
received in that incident.

Speaking to host broadcaster RAI at the start, however, Ferrari revealed
that Cavendish did not want a public apology and instead wanted to meet
with him in private. There was more welcome company for Cavendish at the
end of today's stage, however - girlfriend Peta Todd was waiting with
their month-old daughter Delilah, who had even been issued with her own
accreditation badge by organisers.

http://road.cc/content/news/57985-gi...d-and-daughter


--
Simon Mason



--
Dave - Cyclists VOR. "Many people barely recognise the bicycle as a
legitimate mode of transport; it is either a toy for children or a
vehicle fit only for the poor and/or strange," Dave Horton - Lancaster
University
  #4  
Old May 11th 12, 05:35 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Simon Mason[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,242
Default Giro d'Italia Stage 5: Cav the daddy as he wins in Fano in frontof girlfriend and daughter

He won't have much chance today though - too hilly.

QUOTE:
Like yesterday, today’s itinerary begins inland and heads towards the
Adriatic, but the similarities end there in what is the first medium
mountain stage of the race. Starting in the hill town of Urbino, the
climbs are short but punchy and come thick and fast. The Passo della
Capella, around halfway through, is certain to see attacks, but the
decisive move could well come on the smaller climb of Montegranaro,
33km from the finish and with a gradient of 18 per cent.

It’s a day on which the overall lead may well change hands, and it’s
worth bearing in mind that Michele Scarponi, who before the race began
was presented with the 2011 maglia rosa he won in a courtroom in
February, comes from these parts.

GT: It’s quite hard to control this kind of stage. It depends whose
got the jersey, they might not be too bothered about making sure it’s
a sprint, depending who’s in the break. If we’ve got the jersey, for
instance, we really wouldn’t want to give it up without a fight, we’d
try and keep it. I think it should be a breakaway day, but you never
know – if the team on the front could bring it down to three minutes,
say, with 50k to go, it could tempt some of the sprinters’ teams up.
It’s one of those that could go either way.

For more on this year's race read our full Giro d'Italia Preview.

http://road.cc/content/news/58006-gi...elpidio-210-km

--
Simon Mason
  #5  
Old May 13th 12, 10:29 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Bertie Wooster[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,958
Default Traffic Cops

On Wed, 09 May 2012 21:40:56 +0100, Judith
wrote:




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night - thought to be
involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no street
lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


Perhaps, then, the authorities will think about making it safe for
cyclists. Perhaps speed humps and a 20 mph limit would do the trick -
certainly a cheaper alternative to a segregated Dutch style cycle
track.
  #6  
Old May 13th 12, 10:53 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Mrcheerful[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,662
Default Traffic Cops

Bertie Wooster wrote:
On Wed, 09 May 2012 21:40:56 +0100, Judith
wrote:




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night -
thought to be involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no
street lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


Perhaps, then, the authorities will think about making it safe for
cyclists. Perhaps speed humps and a 20 mph limit would do the trick -
certainly a cheaper alternative to a segregated Dutch style cycle
track.


oh yes, that will be great for the ambulances that use the A10


  #7  
Old May 13th 12, 11:13 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Partac[_10_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,115
Default Traffic Cops



"Bertie Wooster" wrote in message
...

On Wed, 09 May 2012 21:40:56 +0100, Judith
wrote:




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night - thought to
be
involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no street
lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


Perhaps, then, the authorities will think about making it safe for
cyclists. Perhaps speed humps and a 20 mph limit would do the trick -
certainly a cheaper alternative to a segregated Dutch style cycle
track.

Yes, your thinking as usual is as long as it doesn't put the cyclists to any
inconvenience or expense. Perhaps a segregated Dutch style cycle track
should be built by private industry, and the expense recouped by charging
cyclists a toll,in a similar fashion to other schemes that motorists partake
in like the Birmingham expressway, Dartford crossing, Severn bridge et al.

Hang on- that would mean cyclists paying for what they use, wouldn't it? You
wouldn't like that, would you? - Perhaps a cheaper alternative would have
been for the cyclist to buy F*****g lights for his bike, and have given
himself half a chance!

  #8  
Old May 13th 12, 11:18 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Judith[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,000
Default Traffic Cops

On Sun, 13 May 2012 10:29:07 +0100, Bertie Wooster
wrote:

On Wed, 09 May 2012 21:40:56 +0100, Judith
wrote:




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night - thought to be
involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no street
lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


Perhaps, then, the authorities will think about making it safe for
cyclists. Perhaps speed humps and a 20 mph limit would do the trick -
certainly a cheaper alternative to a segregated Dutch style cycle
track.


In your dreams.

How much do you want them to spend - and what will that be per cyclist using
the road per annum?

Perhaps the cyclists could use an alternative route.

--

Bertie Wooster's real name is Tom Crispin.
He uses the name Bertie Wooster so that people involved with
Young Lewisham and Greenwich Cyclists and John Ball primary school
can't see what a tosser he is.

  #9  
Old May 13th 12, 11:47 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
jnugent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,223
Default Traffic Cops

On 13/05/2012 10:29, Bertie Wooster wrote:
On Wed, 09 May 2012 21:40:56 +0100,
wrote:




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night - thought to be
involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no street
lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


Perhaps, then, the authorities will think about making it safe for
cyclists. Perhaps speed humps and a 20 mph limit would do the trick -
certainly a cheaper alternative to a segregated Dutch style cycle
track.


No need whatsoever for any such arrangements. The A10 Ware bypass was built
to take fast north- and south-bound motor traffic out of Ware. Ware is still
available for walking and cycling, and even for driving.

  #10  
Old May 13th 12, 12:38 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Dave - Cyclists VOR
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,703
Default Traffic Cops

On 13/05/2012 10:29, Bertie Wooster wrote:
On Wed, 09 May 2012 21:40:56 +0100,
wrote:




Saw part of the program on BBC2 tonight.

The police were called to an accident on the A10 - at night - thought to be
involving a cyclist.

As the officer said - the A10 is an unlit dual carriage way with no street
lights and fast traffic - it is not place for cyclists.

I quite agree.


Perhaps, then, the authorities will think about making it safe for
cyclists.


Why waste public money on a small minority of road users?

Perhaps speed humps and a 20 mph limit would do the trick -
certainly a cheaper alternative to a segregated Dutch style cycle
track.


An even cheaper alternative would be to have a sign erected saying "Do
not use children's toys on this road - it was designed for viable forms
of transport."

--
Dave - Cyclists VOR. "Many people barely recognise the bicycle as a
legitimate mode of transport; it is either a toy for children or a
vehicle fit only for the poor and/or strange," Dave Horton - Lancaster
University
 




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