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58% of California is in Heavy Drought.



 
 
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  #81  
Old January 12th 17, 10:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Phil Lee
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Posts: 248
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

Tim McNamara considered Wed, 11 Jan 2017
17:57:11 -0600 the perfect time to write:

On Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:38:09 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Last week on the PBS program Nova, those animals were part of the
hour-long show. Seems in the east, at least, they originated in
Algonquin National Park, which had an isolated wolf population. When
coyotes recently extended their range into the area, the coyotes and
wolves mated, and they continue to do so.


I saw that, too- quite interesting as I knew little about the urban
coyote phenomenon. My Mom lived in a suburb of Chicago and reported to
me that coyotes had been seen in town. I was skeptical but apparently
it's a thing.

Here in the Twin Cities some have been spotted, but the prairies are not
too far away to the west and south, and the Mississippi River corridor
makes for pretty convenient migration of non-flying animals into and
through the metro area. I live a more or less literal stone's throw
from an interstate smack in the middle of the Twin Cities and there was
a large grey fox living within a block of our house. Deer have been
seen in backyards here. The Mississippi River gorge is less than a mile
away which probably accounts for this. And of course we have the usual
complement of rabbits, squirrels, racoons, oppossums and a few times a
year we see red-tail hawks and an eagle or two in our immediate
neighborhood.

And the spread of coyotes has been remarkable. They now take young deer
in our forest preserve - a good thing, overall, I think. And with luck,
they may convince people to keep their dogs on leash.


Peoples is everywhere and animals are adapting to our encroachment into
their ranges with urban expansion by figuring out how to live in urban
areas themselves. In what, 40 years or so the Earth's population has
nearly doubled and will do so again in even less time (barring famine,
pestilence or an outbreak of rationality).


This seems to be very similar to the rise of urban foxes that has been
noted in the UK.
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  #82  
Old January 12th 17, 10:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 13,447
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On 1/11/2017 10:56 PM, David Scheidt wrote:
Tim McNamara wrote:
:On Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:38:09 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
:
: Last week on the PBS program Nova, those animals were part of the
: hour-long show. Seems in the east, at least, they originated in
: Algonquin National Park, which had an isolated wolf population. When
: coyotes recently extended their range into the area, the coyotes and
: wolves mated, and they continue to do so.

:I saw that, too- quite interesting as I knew little about the urban
:coyote phenomenon. My Mom lived in a suburb of Chicago and reported to
:me that coyotes had been seen in town. I was skeptical but apparently
:it's a thing.

I live in Chicago. I've seen them from my living room.



the coyote probably won't kill you:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...111-story.html

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #83  
Old January 13th 17, 12:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tim McNamara
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,945
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Thu, 12 Jan 2017 04:56:25 +0000 (UTC), David Scheidt
wrote:
Tim McNamara wrote:
:On Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:38:09 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:
:
: Last week on the PBS program Nova, those animals were part of the
: hour-long show. Seems in the east, at least, they originated in
: Algonquin National Park, which had an isolated wolf population.
: When coyotes recently extended their range into the area, the
: coyotes and wolves mated, and they continue to do so.

:I saw that, too- quite interesting as I knew little about the urban
:coyote phenomenon. My Mom lived in a suburb of Chicago and reported
:to me that coyotes had been seen in town. I was skeptical but
:apparently it's a thing.

I live in Chicago. I've seen them from my living room.


I grew up in DuPage county just across the county line.

Chicago does have a number of parks and forest preserves, some green
waterway corridors, bike corridors, etc., which I suppose facilitate
getting into various neighborhoods without having to cross the Ike or
the Dan Ryan.

The Twin Cities has even had to have special bow hunting permits in the
wooded areas in some neigborhoods to reduce the mushrooming population.
With no predators to speak of, not to mention some folks feeding them,
there is a deer boom. The hunts are not to everyone's liking, of
course. But the alternative is starvation, getting hit by cars, etc.

Minnesota is also monitoring and trying to contain chronic wasting
disease in the deer and related animal populations; I think they are
trying to test every deer taken by getting biopsies of salivary glands
or something lke that. Keeping the deer population from getting too
overcrowded ought to help with that.
  #84  
Old January 13th 17, 01:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Radey Shouman
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,747
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

Tim McNamara writes:

On Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:38:09 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Last week on the PBS program Nova, those animals were part of the
hour-long show. Seems in the east, at least, they originated in
Algonquin National Park, which had an isolated wolf population. When
coyotes recently extended their range into the area, the coyotes and
wolves mated, and they continue to do so.


I saw that, too- quite interesting as I knew little about the urban
coyote phenomenon. My Mom lived in a suburb of Chicago and reported to
me that coyotes had been seen in town. I was skeptical but apparently
it's a thing.

Here in the Twin Cities some have been spotted, but the prairies are not
too far away to the west and south, and the Mississippi River corridor
makes for pretty convenient migration of non-flying animals into and
through the metro area. I live a more or less literal stone's throw
from an interstate smack in the middle of the Twin Cities and there was
a large grey fox living within a block of our house. Deer have been
seen in backyards here. The Mississippi River gorge is less than a mile
away which probably accounts for this. And of course we have the usual
complement of rabbits, squirrels, racoons, oppossums and a few times a
year we see red-tail hawks and an eagle or two in our immediate
neighborhood.

And the spread of coyotes has been remarkable. They now take young deer
in our forest preserve - a good thing, overall, I think. And with luck,
they may convince people to keep their dogs on leash.


Peoples is everywhere and animals are adapting to our encroachment into
their ranges with urban expansion by figuring out how to live in urban
areas themselves. In what, 40 years or so the Earth's population has
nearly doubled and will do so again in even less time (barring famine,
pestilence or an outbreak of rationality).


Coyotes are well established themselves on Cape Cod. They're snacking on
shih-tzus and moggies. Much bigger than they were in their original
range, give them a few hundred generations and there will be wolves again.

--
  #85  
Old January 13th 17, 05:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Thursday, January 12, 2017 at 4:56:49 PM UTC-8, Radey Shouman wrote:
Tim McNamara writes:

On Tue, 10 Jan 2017 12:38:09 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Last week on the PBS program Nova, those animals were part of the
hour-long show. Seems in the east, at least, they originated in
Algonquin National Park, which had an isolated wolf population. When
coyotes recently extended their range into the area, the coyotes and
wolves mated, and they continue to do so.


I saw that, too- quite interesting as I knew little about the urban
coyote phenomenon. My Mom lived in a suburb of Chicago and reported to
me that coyotes had been seen in town. I was skeptical but apparently
it's a thing.

Here in the Twin Cities some have been spotted, but the prairies are not
too far away to the west and south, and the Mississippi River corridor
makes for pretty convenient migration of non-flying animals into and
through the metro area. I live a more or less literal stone's throw
from an interstate smack in the middle of the Twin Cities and there was
a large grey fox living within a block of our house. Deer have been
seen in backyards here. The Mississippi River gorge is less than a mile
away which probably accounts for this. And of course we have the usual
complement of rabbits, squirrels, racoons, oppossums and a few times a
year we see red-tail hawks and an eagle or two in our immediate
neighborhood.

And the spread of coyotes has been remarkable. They now take young deer
in our forest preserve - a good thing, overall, I think. And with luck,
they may convince people to keep their dogs on leash.


Peoples is everywhere and animals are adapting to our encroachment into
their ranges with urban expansion by figuring out how to live in urban
areas themselves. In what, 40 years or so the Earth's population has
nearly doubled and will do so again in even less time (barring famine,
pestilence or an outbreak of rationality).


Coyotes are well established themselves on Cape Cod. They're snacking on
shih-tzus and moggies. Much bigger than they were in their original
range, give them a few hundred generations and there will be wolves again..

--


Not if Darwin has anything to say about it. Predators and scavengers have an entirely different physical and social make-up. That's what really ticks me off when I watched a wolf running for almost a mile. Scavengers do not have the physical make-up to so anything like that. And coyotes do NOT look like a wolf. Showing zoo animals fat and sassy is not showing what really is the case in the wild.
  #86  
Old January 13th 17, 06:48 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,424
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

And coyotes do NOT look like a wolf.
Huh?!? Tom they both look like a german shepherd, just a bit bigger

  #87  
Old January 13th 17, 10:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 5,870
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at 9:14:37 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, January 10, 2017 at 5:12:56 PM UTC-8, Duane wrote:

I'm not a big fan of riding in the rain. If it's pouring when I get up for
work I'm likely to drive. I won't let the threat of rain stop me so I've
been caught in it. I ride my road bike in the rain since I sold the
touring bike. I don't really have problems with the 700c 23s that I use.
I'm running them at 90 psi and they grip well enough. The real problem with
rain for me is the visibility. Both mine and the drivers. As for freezing
rain, forget it.


It isn't the rain that bothers me nearly so much as the drivers in California are terrible to begin with and the rain doesn't make them any better. When you turn on the news and 20 minutes after the rain starts you have crashes on every freeway in the entire area you get the idea. And then Google Maps will route cars around the wrecks on side streets that are not meant for anything over 20 mph and they will attempt to drive at 40 mph.

I drive down a hill and stop at the light at the bottom and two cars slide into the intersection and it's only by the grace of God that no one was in the way. And THIS right in front of the Sheriff's department.

I'm going to ride in this sort of thing without 3 feet of armor around me?


So is the drought over? I've been off my bike (except on rollers) since a storm on Wednesday that dropped a foot of snow. On the roadways, its mostly packed into mounds since we don't have good snow removal in the PDX. I'd ride in on my studs, but it would put me on the roadways right next to the cars. It's too deep to ride (even with a fat bike) on the side paths. So much for the bike share bikes. http://image.oregonlive.com/home/oli...0d798225cd.JPG

Riding home at the start of the storm on Tuesday evening, I was getting snow down my throat, which I hate. If it were like this in PDX on a regular basis, I'd move. I'm looking forward to rain in the city and snow in the mountains, where it belongs. Blue bird ski day on Sunday!

-- Jay Beattie.

  #88  
Old January 13th 17, 10:56 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,900
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On 13/01/2017 4:06 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at 9:14:37 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, January 10, 2017 at 5:12:56 PM UTC-8, Duane wrote:

I'm not a big fan of riding in the rain. If it's pouring when I get up for
work I'm likely to drive. I won't let the threat of rain stop me so I've
been caught in it. I ride my road bike in the rain since I sold the
touring bike. I don't really have problems with the 700c 23s that I use.
I'm running them at 90 psi and they grip well enough. The real problem with
rain for me is the visibility. Both mine and the drivers. As for freezing
rain, forget it.


It isn't the rain that bothers me nearly so much as the drivers in California are terrible to begin with and the rain doesn't make them any better. When you turn on the news and 20 minutes after the rain starts you have crashes on every freeway in the entire area you get the idea. And then Google Maps will route cars around the wrecks on side streets that are not meant for anything over 20 mph and they will attempt to drive at 40 mph.

I drive down a hill and stop at the light at the bottom and two cars slide into the intersection and it's only by the grace of God that no one was in the way. And THIS right in front of the Sheriff's department.

I'm going to ride in this sort of thing without 3 feet of armor around me?


So is the drought over? I've been off my bike (except on rollers) since a storm on Wednesday that dropped a foot of snow. On the roadways, its mostly packed into mounds since we don't have good snow removal in the PDX. I'd ride in on my studs, but it would put me on the roadways right next to the cars. It's too deep to ride (even with a fat bike) on the side paths. So much for the bike share bikes. http://image.oregonlive.com/home/oli...0d798225cd.JPG

Riding home at the start of the storm on Tuesday evening, I was getting snow down my throat, which I hate. If it were like this in PDX on a regular basis, I'd move. I'm looking forward to rain in the city and snow in the mountains, where it belongs. Blue bird ski day on Sunday!


Sounds like a typical fall day in Québec. g Don't move, get XC skis
and snow shoes.

  #89  
Old January 14th 17, 12:11 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,011
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

is the drought over ? wishful thinking yet Texas deluged then ...Texas...TMS...was in drought in west when I arrived 8 months after Noah left.

Ima going back in a few weeks. Go over to Anza Borrego see what the creosote looks like.

Know of my rain experiment journey ? AFAIK, compares to the Red Sea incident.

Interesting fact, journey began with a post in Groups.

  #90  
Old January 14th 17, 12:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,870
Default 58% of California is in Heavy Drought.

On Friday, January 13, 2017 at 1:56:56 PM UTC-8, Duane wrote:
On 13/01/2017 4:06 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, January 11, 2017 at 9:14:37 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Tuesday, January 10, 2017 at 5:12:56 PM UTC-8, Duane wrote:

I'm not a big fan of riding in the rain. If it's pouring when I get up for
work I'm likely to drive. I won't let the threat of rain stop me so I've
been caught in it. I ride my road bike in the rain since I sold the
touring bike. I don't really have problems with the 700c 23s that I use.
I'm running them at 90 psi and they grip well enough. The real problem with
rain for me is the visibility. Both mine and the drivers. As for freezing
rain, forget it.

It isn't the rain that bothers me nearly so much as the drivers in California are terrible to begin with and the rain doesn't make them any better. When you turn on the news and 20 minutes after the rain starts you have crashes on every freeway in the entire area you get the idea. And then Google Maps will route cars around the wrecks on side streets that are not meant for anything over 20 mph and they will attempt to drive at 40 mph.

I drive down a hill and stop at the light at the bottom and two cars slide into the intersection and it's only by the grace of God that no one was in the way. And THIS right in front of the Sheriff's department.

I'm going to ride in this sort of thing without 3 feet of armor around me?


So is the drought over? I've been off my bike (except on rollers) since a storm on Wednesday that dropped a foot of snow. On the roadways, its mostly packed into mounds since we don't have good snow removal in the PDX. I'd ride in on my studs, but it would put me on the roadways right next to the cars. It's too deep to ride (even with a fat bike) on the side paths. So much for the bike share bikes. http://image.oregonlive.com/home/oli...0d798225cd.JPG

Riding home at the start of the storm on Tuesday evening, I was getting snow down my throat, which I hate. If it were like this in PDX on a regular basis, I'd move. I'm looking forward to rain in the city and snow in the mountains, where it belongs. Blue bird ski day on Sunday!


Sounds like a typical fall day in Québec. g Don't move, get XC skis
and snow shoes.


I feel like a dope because I got ride of all my XC equipment, which was collecting dust after switching to downhill. Anyway, snow never hangs around for more than a week at a time -- ten days tops, so its not a place where you can easily switch from riding to skiing or snow-shoeing. By next Tuesday or Wednesday, I'll be riding in slop and gravel.

-- Jay Beattie.

 




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