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General Question: How difficult to take a modern commuter/touring bicycle and make it Single Speed?



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 26th 04, 04:44 PM
Lobo Tommy
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Default General Question: How difficult to take a modern commuter/touring bicycle and make it Single Speed?

In general, I am thinking a lot of purchasing a Bianchi SASS for
riding in parks and bike trails in excess of 5 miles for fitness. I
am having second thoughts because I am uncertain whether or not I can
carry stuff on it like water, tire patch kit, pump, food, cell phone,
tools, etc... I'm not talking frivilous stuff here - basically
necessities that any beginners faq would recommend bringing along.

So it got me thinking - how difficult would it be to take a Trek 520
or Breezer or any other touring bike and make it a single speed?
This to me would be the best of both worlds. I have ton a ton of
research but am still a newb. I've looked at custom bicycle solutions
but their seems to be a 3:1 ratio of single speed mountain bikes to
street bikes - and nothing for touring. And that's what I need for
plus a slightly meatier tire.

The commute/touring bicycle would likely be more comfortable on the
long haul.

Any ideas or help would be appreciated!
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  #2  
Old March 26th 04, 05:26 PM
Dan Daniel
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Default General Question: How difficult to take a modern commuter/touring bicycle and make it Single Speed?

On 26 Mar 2004 08:44:14 -0800, (Lobo Tommy) wrote:



Any ideas or help would be appreciated!


You have probably found these already, but just in case-

http://www.bontrager.com/keith/rants.asp?id=8

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/fixed/index.html


  #3  
Old March 26th 04, 05:52 PM
Zoot Katz
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Default General Question: How difficult to take a modern commuter/touring bicycle and make it Single Speed?

26 Mar 2004 08:44:14 -0800,
,
(Lobo Tommy) wrote:

In general, I am thinking a lot of purchasing a Bianchi SASS for
riding in parks and bike trails in excess of 5 miles for fitness. I
am having second thoughts because I am uncertain whether or not I can
carry stuff on it like water, tire patch kit, pump, food, cell phone,
tools, etc... I'm not talking frivilous stuff here - basically
necessities that any beginners faq would recommend bringing along.

A small "under seat" bag or a large "saddle bag" fit SS bikes the same
as any other bike. A rack for carrying light loads can be clamped to
the seat post. Lacking eyelets and bosses, a real rack can be fitted
with special clips and creativity. The SASS frame has braze-ons for
mounting two bottle holders. Mounting full fenders could be
problematic because the back wheel enters from the rear.

Or to preserve the purity you can stuff everything into a "camelback"
type pack.

So it got me thinking - how difficult would it be to take a Trek 520
or Breezer or any other touring bike and make it a single speed?


Depends on the frame. Vertical dropouts will restrict the placement of
the rear wheel which affects chain tension and gear choices. Other
factors are the extraneous cable stops, wheel dish and axle length.

This to me would be the best of both worlds.


I've built all my own SS bikes from old frames with horizontal
dropouts for less than half the cost of the Redline.

Do read -
http://www.sheldonbrown.com/singlespeed.html
--
zk
  #5  
Old March 27th 04, 04:53 PM
Steven Scharf
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Default General Question: How difficult to take a modern commuter/touring bicycle and make it Single Speed?

(Lobo Tommy) wrote in message om...
In general, I am thinking a lot of purchasing a Bianchi SASS for
riding in parks and bike trails in excess of 5 miles for fitness. I
am having second thoughts because I am uncertain whether or not I can
carry stuff on it like water, tire patch kit, pump, food, cell phone,
tools, etc... I'm not talking frivilous stuff here - basically
necessities that any beginners faq would recommend bringing along.

So it got me thinking - how difficult would it be to take a Trek 520
or Breezer or any other touring bike and make it a single speed?
This to me would be the best of both worlds. I have ton a ton of
research but am still a newb. I've looked at custom bicycle solutions
but their seems to be a 3:1 ratio of single speed mountain bikes to
street bikes - and nothing for touring. And that's what I need for
plus a slightly meatier tire.

The commute/touring bicycle would likely be more comfortable on the
long haul.

Any ideas or help would be appreciated!


See
http://commutebike.com

Forget about a touring bicycle, since you're the only person in the
world that wants a single speed touring bicycle the manufacturers
don't make them!

There are several internal rear hub bicycles that you could convert to
single speed with a new rear wheel with a single cog. There are custom
single speed bicycles for $400 that perfectly match what you are
looking for. But you're looking more and more like a troll, so I think
this is the last post for me on this subject.
  #6  
Old March 31st 04, 07:58 PM
Top Sirloin
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Default General Question: How difficult to take a modern commuter/touringbicycle and make it Single Speed?

Lobo Tommy wrote:

So it got me thinking - how difficult would it be to take a Trek 520
or Breezer or any other touring bike and make it a single speed?
This to me would be the best of both worlds. I have ton a ton of
research but am still a newb. I've looked at custom bicycle solutions
but their seems to be a 3:1 ratio of single speed mountain bikes to
street bikes - and nothing for touring. And that's what I need for
plus a slightly meatier tire.


The typical 70's-80's horizontal dropout road
frame that gets built into a singlespeed/fixie has
plenty of tire clearence. If everything is
optimal you can build one _cheap_, like $60 in
parts cheap (including the bike). If you end up
having to rebuild the rear wheel, buy a different
seatpost, replace the tires, etc. you can end up
around $150 or more.

--
Scott Johnson / scottjohnson at kc dot rr dot com
 




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