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Making America into Amsterdam



 
 
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  #231  
Old July 20th 18, 03:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,724
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at 2:13:03 PM UTC-4, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-07-16 17:11, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/16/2018 5:42 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-07-16 12:46, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, July 16, 2018 at 10:19:52 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:

I've use rope to tow another rider. When the rear derailer gets
pretzeled out in the boonies the only other option would be to hoof
it and be late.

Or straighten the derailleur with your hand and ride on. Again, we're
talking about road bikes. With my last crash, I not only straightened
the derailleur enough to continue riding, ...


In our case the outer shell of the derailer was no longer in one
piece, the chain was throughly mangled and IIRC one of the derailer
idlers had gone AWOL. That presents a minor inconvenience.


The classic solution is to shorten the chain so it fits from appropriate
chainring to appropriate rear cog, bypassing the derailleur. Start by
finding a nail plus a rock, of course...


The bike frame even had those old-fashioned long-slotted drop-outs with
peg screws which would have made adjusting to a shorter chain sans
derailer easy. However, there was not enough non-mangled stretch of
chain left to do that. The whole chain was a mess. It happens. Not to
anyone around you, ever, of course.

[...]

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


And you couldn't use some of your myriad of tools and knowhow to twist the chain enough to again be useful?

Btw, if a person is severely dehydrated plain old water is NOT going to get them mobile again = they need plenty of electrolytes too. Heat exhaustion and/or heat stroke are a different kettle of fish and usually require medical care. From the Mayo clinic regarding heat stroke: "Heatstroke requires emergency treatment. Untreated heatstroke can quickly damage your brain, heart, kidneys and muscles. The damage worsens the longer treatment is delayed, increasing your risk of serious complications or death."

Wow! I've never heard of anyone persisting in pursuing such a dangerous activity (bicycling in your case) in such a dangerous locale (your neck of the woods) for so long a time. You must live a charmed life.

Cheers
Ads
  #232  
Old July 20th 18, 04:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,724
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 12:39:10 PM UTC-4, duane wrote:
On 18/07/2018 12:03 PM, Radey Shouman wrote:
Duane writes:

On 17/07/2018 6:46 PM, Joerg wrote:

In the US we have a much nastier habit among weight weenie cyclists
who probably find the weight of a paper tissue unbearable. So they
don't carry any. When the nose gets plugged they press a finger
against one side and let off a "snot rocket", then against the other
for missile #2. I was almost hit by one when pulling out to pass a
cyclist. It's disgusting.


Yes, I'm sure it's the weight of the tissue that prevents these
cyclists from using them. Maybe it's some guy coming up behind them
with the tunes blaring and the bright headlight that invokes this
behavior...


I would much rather see the occasional tiny blob of snot on the road
instead of blowing tissues. How and from where does one fish a dry
tissue when riding along? Think of the trees, for God's sake.


Yeah, but you don't live "out there" where things get really hairy.
You're probably only riding in the pacific traffic on Comm Ave...


Many times I think that Joerg sits at a brew pub and dreams up his scenarios that he posts here. Geeze, even in Northern Ontario, Canada off road touring on my MTB with 40 lbs or so of gear I don't have near the problems he has.

Cheers
  #233  
Old July 20th 18, 07:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 272
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On Thursday, July 19, 2018 at 8:59:16 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/19/2018 2:13 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 11:08:23 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/18/2018 12:15 PM, jbeattie wrote:

I spit on tiny clown pumps -- no, I mean it. Sometimes the pump-handle/piston needs lubrication. I prefer the hose models, but all of them are a PITA and require about 200 strokes to get a tire up to pressure.

I also carry CO2 cartridges and used both the pump and the cartridges last weekend due to a flat-fest with my son. I buy cheap cartridges in bulk from Amazon. Yes, the environmental impact of steel cartridges is bad . . . but they're so convenient! I scoffed at them until I started using them, but I would not go with CO2 alone. I always carry a pump.

A couple years ago, after some health problems, I went on a club ride
that was nearly too much for me. It was very hot, and I think my recent
bronchitis was still constricting my breathing. I was fighting to keep up.

As we were climbing on one of the more remote roads around here, one guy
flatted. Normally I'm one of the chief flat fixers, but I lay my bike
down, then lay myself down on its downhill side and propped my feet up
on the handlebars, trying to get some strength back.

Lucky for me, the repair was a disaster. They put in one spare tube, but
it was leaking badly. They put another tube in and tried inflating it
with CO2. The CO2 fitting somehow misfired. They wasted another CO2...
and so on.

I finally got up and gave them my full-size Zefal pump, the only
inflating device I ever carry. (Except on the folding bike, where I
have a mini pump stashed.)

They succeeded with the Zefal. And I had recovered enough that I was OK
the rest of the ride, and perfect after a Dairy Queen stop for a bunch
of Mountain Dew.

I think if I were to carry anything else on the bike, it would be
Mountain Dew.

--
- Frank Krygowski


My experience is just the opposite. A common mistake people make with CO2 cartridges is that the fill their tire in one blow. The valve will freeze if there is some humidity in the air. Better is to fill your tire in 3 or 4 blows and wait a couple of seconds in between. people should have paid attention during science class ;-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adiabatic_process

I know about adiabatic processes, and it's obvious the temperature of
the expanding CO2 will drop. But I have no personal experience with CO2
tire inflaters. Are you saying the inside of the valve freezes? Can you
explain how that happens?

It seems to me the CO2 being injected must be dry, and the tube is
essentially empty of air. I'd think if ice formed, it would be on the
outside of the valve where it doesn't matter.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Good question but somehow some moisture gets in and freezes the valve stuck.. There is a relation between the relative humidity and the occurence of a stuck valve. It can be solved by warming the valve by holding it between your fingers for a couple of seconds.

Lou
  #234  
Old July 20th 18, 01:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
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Posts: 183
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On 19/07/2018 8:31 PM, sms wrote:
On 7/19/2018 4:07 PM, Duane wrote:

snip

Strange but I’ve noticed a lot of road bike commuters here the last
couple
of days.** Maybe it’s the TDF* or maybe it’s the less humid temps.** We
have a couple new bike paths in the area and they’re smooth, wide and
well
designed.* Amazing.* Seem to be getting used...


Perhaps they opened some new parking lots for those bike paths. That has
got to be it. As we recently learned "almost ALL trail users in almost
all areas use a car to haul their bike to the trail." LOL. Usenet is
always amusing.


I don't live out in the wilds with mountain lions and sabre tooth
tigers. I live in a city so the paths I'm talking about are ALL close
to parking. Like my driveway. Or my office parking lot. Or the
streets they parallel.

On rec rides I'm usually heading out toward Ontario where the roads are
better and I pass a few bike paths and some of them have parking lots.
And the lots and paths are always full on weekends so I don't use them.
But I don't see the point of belittling people that do ride bikes only
for recreation. A lot of people start like that and find they like
cycling enough to use their bikes instead of their cars.
  #235  
Old July 20th 18, 02:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On 7/19/2018 8:31 PM, sms wrote:
On 7/19/2018 4:07 PM, Duane wrote:

snip

Strange but I’ve noticed a lot of road bike commuters here the last
couple
of days.** Maybe it’s the TDF* or maybe it’s the less humid temps.** We
have a couple new bike paths in the area and they’re smooth, wide and
well
designed.* Amazing.* Seem to be getting used...


Perhaps they opened some new parking lots for those bike paths. That has
got to be it. As we recently learned "almost ALL trail users in almost
all areas use a car to haul their bike to the trail." LOL. Usenet is
always amusing.


And you were recently given a link to a survey of 20 different trails in
two states. The results said 1% used the trail for commuting.

But data never has made any sense to you, Stephen.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #236  
Old July 20th 18, 03:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,723
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On 7/20/2018 8:34 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/19/2018 8:31 PM, sms wrote:
On 7/19/2018 4:07 PM, Duane wrote:

snip

Strange but I’ve noticed a lot of road bike commuters
here the last couple
of days. Maybe it’s the TDF or maybe it’s the
less humid temps. We
have a couple new bike paths in the area and they’re
smooth, wide and well
designed. Amazing. Seem to be getting used...


Perhaps they opened some new parking lots for those bike
paths. That has got to be it. As we recently learned
"almost ALL trail users in almost all areas use a car to
haul their bike to the trail." LOL. Usenet is always amusing.


And you were recently given a link to a survey of 20
different trails in two states. The results said 1% used the
trail for commuting.

But data never has made any sense to you, Stephen.


Well, you can't expect people to ride bicycle in alleys.
That's not safe.

https://wbbm780.radio.com/articles/b...chicago-police

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #237  
Old July 20th 18, 03:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,323
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On 7/20/2018 5:04 AM, Duane wrote:
On 19/07/2018 8:31 PM, sms wrote:


snip

Perhaps they opened some new parking lots for those bike paths. That
has got to be it. As we recently learned "almost ALL trail users in
almost all areas use a car to haul their bike to the trail." LOL.
Usenet is always amusing.


I don't live out in the wilds with mountain lions and sabre tooth
tigers.* I live in a city so the paths I'm talking about are ALL close
to parking.* Like my driveway.* Or my office parking lot.* Or the
streets they parallel.


Yes, that's how the bike paths are where I am to. Occasionally, if they
pass through a park, there are parking lots. Many of the paths are along
creeks and rivers which had many parks next to them long before a path
was put in. The American River Path is one such example. It's often
convenient to put paths next to waterways because the path can take
advantage of the existing underpasses under roads.

I was astounded to learn that "almost ALL trail users in almost all
areas use a car to haul their bike to the trail."

Seriously, some people need to learn that life exists outside their own
neighborhood, and that not all areas of the country are exactly the
same, so they don't make statements that generalize based on their own
limited experiences. Certainly people from Silicon Valley and the Bay
Area, that have never experienced the eastern U.S., experience culture
shock when they go back east, or to the deep south.
  #238  
Old July 20th 18, 04:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,323
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On 7/20/2018 7:22 AM, AMuzi wrote:

snip

Well, you can't expect people to ride bicycle in alleys. That's not safe.

https://wbbm780.radio.com/articles/b...chicago-police


Where I grew up, the new suburb that was build had alleys behinds all
the houses http://oi63.tinypic.com/2l96p8l.jpg.

The alleys were the defacto bike paths for kids. They ran long
distances, though they would cross all the regular streets and you were
supposed to stop. They even had speed limit signs in the alleys "12 MPH."

The alleys were very useful since you could have driveways in the back
of your house, and garbage trucks could collect the trash from both
sides at once since the alleys were narrow.

Strangely, even though the alleys were used as bike paths, there were no
parking lots, LOL.
  #239  
Old July 20th 18, 05:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,366
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On Thursday, July 19, 2018 at 11:34:53 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Thursday, July 19, 2018 at 8:59:16 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/19/2018 2:13 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 11:08:23 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/18/2018 12:15 PM, jbeattie wrote:

I spit on tiny clown pumps -- no, I mean it. Sometimes the pump-handle/piston needs lubrication. I prefer the hose models, but all of them are a PITA and require about 200 strokes to get a tire up to pressure.

I also carry CO2 cartridges and used both the pump and the cartridges last weekend due to a flat-fest with my son. I buy cheap cartridges in bulk from Amazon. Yes, the environmental impact of steel cartridges is bad . . . but they're so convenient! I scoffed at them until I started using them, but I would not go with CO2 alone. I always carry a pump.

A couple years ago, after some health problems, I went on a club ride
that was nearly too much for me. It was very hot, and I think my recent
bronchitis was still constricting my breathing. I was fighting to keep up.

As we were climbing on one of the more remote roads around here, one guy
flatted. Normally I'm one of the chief flat fixers, but I lay my bike
down, then lay myself down on its downhill side and propped my feet up
on the handlebars, trying to get some strength back.

Lucky for me, the repair was a disaster. They put in one spare tube, but
it was leaking badly. They put another tube in and tried inflating it
with CO2. The CO2 fitting somehow misfired. They wasted another CO2....
and so on.

I finally got up and gave them my full-size Zefal pump, the only
inflating device I ever carry. (Except on the folding bike, where I
have a mini pump stashed.)

They succeeded with the Zefal. And I had recovered enough that I was OK
the rest of the ride, and perfect after a Dairy Queen stop for a bunch
of Mountain Dew.

I think if I were to carry anything else on the bike, it would be
Mountain Dew.

--
- Frank Krygowski

My experience is just the opposite. A common mistake people make with CO2 cartridges is that the fill their tire in one blow. The valve will freeze if there is some humidity in the air. Better is to fill your tire in 3 or 4 blows and wait a couple of seconds in between. people should have paid attention during science class ;-)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adiabatic_process

I know about adiabatic processes, and it's obvious the temperature of
the expanding CO2 will drop. But I have no personal experience with CO2
tire inflaters. Are you saying the inside of the valve freezes? Can you
explain how that happens?

It seems to me the CO2 being injected must be dry, and the tube is
essentially empty of air. I'd think if ice formed, it would be on the
outside of the valve where it doesn't matter.

--
- Frank Krygowski


Good question but somehow some moisture gets in and freezes the valve stuck. There is a relation between the relative humidity and the occurence of a stuck valve. It can be solved by warming the valve by holding it between your fingers for a couple of seconds.


I get freezing on the valve, but I've never had a problem with getting a complete fill with a single "shot." I use a PDW Shiny Object that has a screw valve. https://ridepdw.com/products/shiny-o...nt=24673864833 You can start with a low flow and then ramp it up. https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/14...879473743 691 I typically just open the valve and let it go.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #240  
Old July 20th 18, 05:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,366
Default Making America into Amsterdam

On Friday, July 20, 2018 at 7:53:52 AM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 7/20/2018 5:04 AM, Duane wrote:
On 19/07/2018 8:31 PM, sms wrote:


snip

Perhaps they opened some new parking lots for those bike paths. That
has got to be it. As we recently learned "almost ALL trail users in
almost all areas use a car to haul their bike to the trail." LOL.
Usenet is always amusing.


I don't live out in the wilds with mountain lions and sabre tooth
tigers.* I live in a city so the paths I'm talking about are ALL close
to parking.* Like my driveway.* Or my office parking lot.* Or the
streets they parallel.


Yes, that's how the bike paths are where I am to. Occasionally, if they
pass through a park, there are parking lots. Many of the paths are along
creeks and rivers which had many parks next to them long before a path
was put in. The American River Path is one such example. It's often
convenient to put paths next to waterways because the path can take
advantage of the existing underpasses under roads.

I was astounded to learn that "almost ALL trail users in almost all
areas use a car to haul their bike to the trail."

Seriously, some people need to learn that life exists outside their own
neighborhood, and that not all areas of the country are exactly the
same, so they don't make statements that generalize based on their own
limited experiences. Certainly people from Silicon Valley and the Bay
Area, that have never experienced the eastern U.S., experience culture
shock when they go back east, or to the deep south.


Sort of OT, but I was riding to work this morning through the South Waterfront in a road surface bike lane, and two suburbanite young women -- one with a baby jogger -- came running straight at me. I said something to the effect of "what the f*** are you thinking?" And then there was an older guy doing the same thing. This is like a bike lane super-highway area and yet you have these clowns who just don't get it. I'm seeing a lot of this lately -- it has become a thing to run in the bike lane, and it is the same young hip demographic for the most part. I'm getting tired of yelling at them. We need some of Muzi's shooters to clean out the bike lanes.

-- Jay Beattie.
 




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