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  #1  
Old June 3rd 08, 01:59 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Roger Merriman
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My partner's company has just started doing the bike to work. so my
partner has hit upon the idea of a folding bike.

It's not likely to be used often. but now and then it would be handy.

it's likely to live in the car (1) boot so smaller is better, though
Sa's route takes her along park gravel paths etc so needs to be able to
cope and not be too twichy about it.

any thoughts? i'm heading towards a brompton if only due to the fold
into a tiny wee lump. though the dawes is cheaper and with bigger wheels
should offer a more solid ride.

Roger

(1) 10 year old ford fiesta
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  #2  
Old June 3rd 08, 02:51 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Peter Clinch
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Roger Merriman wrote:

It's not likely to be used often. but now and then it would be handy.

it's likely to live in the car (1) boot so smaller is better, though
Sa's route takes her along park gravel paths etc so needs to be able to
cope and not be too twichy about it.

any thoughts? i'm heading towards a brompton if only due to the fold
into a tiny wee lump. though the dawes is cheaper and with bigger wheels
should offer a more solid ride.


You can't go that wrong with a Brom: if you never use it you'll be able
to sell it on at an excellent price, and if you've bought it through the
tax break you're unlikely to lose any money at all and you won't have
any trouble finding a buyer.

On the "not likely to be used often", I bought my first one on exactly
that premise and now use a Brom as my primary hack bike that does more
trips by number than my other bikes put together. You may be pleasantly
surprised at how useful and versatile a steed it is.

I've taken mine along MTB trails around Loch Morlich and around the
local woods, and we live by an unsurfaced lane: it's not ideal for any
of these, but it does cope okay, especially if you get the optional
Marathons for it which have a little more tread than Brompton's own tyres.

Twitchiness of the steering is something I personally find a non-issue.
Folks I've lent it to have suggested they find it a bit nervous at
first but after a wee while they're dialled in and it ceases to be a
problem. While other folders may give a more "normal" ride, I wouldn't
say the Brom is in any way un-solid (I think you want a Bickerton for
that bendy feeling...) unless you like heaving on the handlebars out of
the saddle in big gears. if you do like that sort of riding then a Brom
isn't ideal, but if you're happy staying sat down and spinning to your
destination it offers a very good ride IMHO.

Until recently we had a 10 year old Fiesta... unless you routinely have
the back seats down there's not much room in the boot (a lot of why we
changed to a Skoda Fabia estate, in fact) and the smaller the better.
The Brom fits in with no trouble at all.

Since you can get accessories on the scheme as well as bikes, I'd
strongly recommend the carrier block and one of the bags (I have the
standard pannier which is a nice mix of decent carrying capacity and
utility). I'd also suggest the reduced gearing, even for flattish
places (but then I like spinning at higher cadences, though if it's a
hilly spot I think you might regret the standard gearing).

Finally, my personal opinion is the 'C' budget model is a false economy:
yes, it's cheaper, but no mudguards and downgraded components is just
something you'll pay for later, and when the tax-man isn't taking part
of the strain for you.

Pete.

p.s., I have heard ruumours that Guy has one of these. perhaps he'll
break with tradition and tell you about it...
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
  #3  
Old June 3rd 08, 05:45 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Toby Sleigh[_2_]
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"Peter Clinch" wrote in message
...
Roger Merriman wrote:

It's not likely to be used often. but now and then it would be handy.


On the "not likely to be used often", I bought my first one on exactly
that premise and now use a Brom as my primary hack bike that does more
trips by number than my other bikes put together. You may be pleasantly
surprised at how useful and versatile a steed it is.

I got my Brompton via the cycle to work scheme, expecting to use it on
occasional business trips by train.
It is now my main bike, I use it for everything including my commute from
Ealing to Whitehall ( 20 mile return )
Save money by not buying a lock, if you lock it up it will be stolen.
I've taken mine into MOD establishments, NATO HQ Germany, Eurostar,
hospitals, supermarkets pubs etc etc.
In the 30 months I've had it I've never had any trouble taking it anywhere
except The Griffin pub in BRENTFORD,
probably less than half a mile from the Brompton factory, tosser.








  #4  
Old June 3rd 08, 06:11 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Just zis Guy, you know?
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Posts: 1,612
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On Tue, 03 Jun 2008 14:51:53 +0100, Peter Clinch
said in
:

On the "not likely to be used often", I bought my first one on exactly
that premise and now use a Brom as my primary hack bike that does more
trips by number than my other bikes put together. You may be pleasantly
surprised at how useful and versatile a steed it is.


True dat. My other bikes think I no longer love them, but the truth
is more prosaic: the Brom is so good that it's usually not worth the
trivial effort of unhooking the tourer or MTB from the garage wall.
The bent only gets out for the occasional joyride.

Guy
--
May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk

85% of helmet statistics are made up, 69% of them at CHS, Puget Sound
  #5  
Old June 4th 08, 11:33 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Nigel Cliffe
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Peter Clinch wrote:
Roger Merriman wrote:


any thoughts? i'm heading towards a brompton if only due to the fold
into a tiny wee lump. though the dawes is cheaper and with bigger
wheels should offer a more solid ride.


You can't go that wrong with a Brom: if you never use it you'll be
able to sell it on at an excellent price,........


Finally, my personal opinion is the 'C' budget model is a false
economy: yes, it's cheaper, but no mudguards and downgraded
components is just something you'll pay for later


I'm pretty certain that Brompton have discontinued the "C" model, so the
concerns about buying budget parts then replacing them shortly afterwards no
longer exists.

If wanting the ultimate lightweight Brompton, its no longer the cheap C, but
the expensive Titanium option in single-speed form.




- Nigel


--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/


  #6  
Old June 4th 08, 01:07 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Roger Merriman
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Posts: 2,108
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Peter Clinch wrote:

Roger Merriman wrote:

It's not likely to be used often. but now and then it would be handy.

it's likely to live in the car (1) boot so smaller is better, though
Sa's route takes her along park gravel paths etc so needs to be able to
cope and not be too twichy about it.

any thoughts? i'm heading towards a brompton if only due to the fold
into a tiny wee lump. though the dawes is cheaper and with bigger wheels
should offer a more solid ride.


You can't go that wrong with a Brom: if you never use it you'll be able
to sell it on at an excellent price, and if you've bought it through the
tax break you're unlikely to lose any money at all and you won't have
any trouble finding a buyer.

true. though hopefully it will get some use. though we'll have to check
what the stance is if i use it, and it gets nicked damadged etc, ie
insurance.

On the "not likely to be used often", I bought my first one on exactly
that premise and now use a Brom as my primary hack bike that does more
trips by number than my other bikes put together. You may be pleasantly
surprised at how useful and versatile a steed it is.

people do seem to love them, the only issue i can see for me, though not
sa (which is handy as it will be her bike) is i don't have any where to
store bikes at work as the area i'm in changes and is outside work, so i
tend to ride/drive to area and then park up. now big green bike is fine
as it's really not attractive to steal, worse i've had is a half empty
bottle of coke and some empty crisp packets left in the front basket...

but the brompton might well not ne there when i get back so that will
require more thought, on where and when i use it.

I've taken mine along MTB trails around Loch Morlich and around the
local woods, and we live by an unsurfaced lane: it's not ideal for any
of these, but it does cope okay, especially if you get the optional
Marathons for it which have a little more tread than Brompton's own tyres.

i was thinking of the marthons having a poke at the web site on the
weekend. as they do seem to be pritty much perfect city tires.

Twitchiness of the steering is something I personally find a non-issue.
Folks I've lent it to have suggested they find it a bit nervous at
first but after a wee while they're dialled in and it ceases to be a
problem. While other folders may give a more "normal" ride, I wouldn't
say the Brom is in any way un-solid (I think you want a Bickerton for
that bendy feeling...) unless you like heaving on the handlebars out of
the saddle in big gears. if you do like that sort of riding then a Brom
isn't ideal, but if you're happy staying sat down and spinning to your
destination it offers a very good ride IMHO.

well Sa doesn't tend to do such sillyness and i well i'll just have curb
my rocketing away from the lights a bit if it springs around too much.

but it will be sa's bike not mine though i may use it just now and then.

Until recently we had a 10 year old Fiesta... unless you routinely have
the back seats down there's not much room in the boot (a lot of why we
changed to a Skoda Fabia estate, in fact) and the smaller the better.
The Brom fits in with no trouble at all.

the car was free and only had sub 15,000 mile about a year ago. i've put
about 20 on it thus far but even so it's a low milage car. and quite
frankly my intrest in cars is fairly low. and luckly the use is dropping
down which is good.

Since you can get accessories on the scheme as well as bikes, I'd
strongly recommend the carrier block and one of the bags (I have the
standard pannier which is a nice mix of decent carrying capacity and
utility). I'd also suggest the reduced gearing, even for flattish
places (but then I like spinning at higher cadences, though if it's a
hilly spot I think you might regret the standard gearing).

na it's SW london area, hampton to kingston though Bushy park should be
it's most common route. so near as flat with some gravel tracks etc.

plus sa likes higher gears.

Finally, my personal opinion is the 'C' budget model is a false economy:
yes, it's cheaper, but no mudguards and downgraded components is just
something you'll pay for later, and when the tax-man isn't taking part
of the strain for you.

looks like one of the M's with paniers and mudguards. possibly lights or
might just drop some twinkies on it.

Pete.

p.s., I have heard ruumours that Guy has one of these. perhaps he'll
break with tradition and tell you about it...


heh

roger
--
www.rogermerriman.com
  #7  
Old June 4th 08, 01:24 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Alan Braggins
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In article , Roger Merriman wrote:
people do seem to love them, the only issue i can see for me, though not
sa (which is handy as it will be her bike) is i don't have any where to
store bikes at work as the area i'm in changes and is outside work


Usually that's a good argument in favour of a Brompton, as being
so small it will fit under a desk or in a similar space so you can
keep it close. (I realise that might not apply to you.)

A folded Birdy will fit in the back of a Ford Ka with the seats up,
by the way, so while not quite as neat folded as a Brompton (and rather
more expensive), would almost certainly also fit in your Fiesta.
  #8  
Old June 4th 08, 01:38 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Peter Clinch
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Roger Merriman wrote:

true. though hopefully it will get some use. though we'll have to check
what the stance is if i use it, and it gets nicked damadged etc, ie
insurance.


It belongs to the employer who is leasing it to the rider. Convention
is that at the end of the payment period the employer sells it on to
you, usually at 5% or so of initial cost, at which point it's yours.

Since the employer has little use for your bike, if it gets nicked what
will happen in practice is you continue to pay for it under the salary
sacrifice, but you don't have a bike any more.

people do seem to love them, the only issue i can see for me, though not
sa (which is handy as it will be her bike) is i don't have any where to
store bikes at work as the area i'm in changes and is outside work, so i
tend to ride/drive to area and then park up. now big green bike is fine
as it's really not attractive to steal, worse i've had is a half empty
bottle of coke and some empty crisp packets left in the front basket...

but the brompton might well not ne there when i get back so that will
require more thought, on where and when i use it.


It's just as easy to lock as any other bike (there's a handy space in
the frame that makes it very easy to lock frame and rear wheel together
when the back wheel is "parked"). The main point is if you're inside at
all then it needs very little space to sto in a cupboard, under a
desk etc. Not knowing exactly what your work is I don't know how
relevant that will be, but parking securely is typically easier as aside
from anything else you can lock it part-folded or folded where you need
a lot less space for it.

i was thinking of the marthons having a poke at the web site on the
weekend. as they do seem to be pritty much perfect city tires.


I think so, though John B. moaned at some length about them, finding
them rather stodgy compared to Brompton's own. OTOH I've never heard
Marathons described as "a bit skittery in the wet", so you choose, you
lose...

well Sa doesn't tend to do such sillyness and i well i'll just have curb
my rocketing away from the lights a bit if it springs around too much.


Rocketing away from the lights is easy as long as you start in a low
gear (which you always can, with a hub gear) and spin from the saddle.
The small wheels accelerate very well and it's easy to steal a march on
other cyclists who stopped somewhere in the middle of their derailleur
options and have to plod away in something much higher.

looks like one of the M's with paniers and mudguards. possibly lights or
might just drop some twinkies on it.


If you see it as beibng a main bike for either or both of you then
there's the usual urc "the hub dynamos are the business!" suggestion,
but if it's a bit of an experiment it's a lot extra to pay, even at the
reduced rate. But they are *very* good... But some clip on LEDs should
be fine (seatpost takes one for the rear light).

Pete.
--
Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
net http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
  #9  
Old June 4th 08, 02:29 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Roger Merriman
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Alan Braggins wrote:

In article , Roger
Merriman wrote: people do seem to love them, the only issue i can see for
me, though not sa (which is handy as it will be her bike) is i don't have
any where to store bikes at work as the area i'm in changes and is
outside work

Usually that's a good argument in favour of a Brompton, as being
so small it will fit under a desk or in a similar space so you can
keep it close. (I realise that might not apply to you.)

at the moment no, as i travel to a area rather than a building.

A folded Birdy will fit in the back of a Ford Ka with the seats up,
by the way, so while not quite as neat folded as a Brompton (and rather
more expensive), would almost certainly also fit in your Fiesta.


heh sa wouldn't be happy with a Birdy, she likes more sit up and beg
postions as do i to be honest for city bikes.

she attually found http://www.birdybike.com/ when searching for our
local bike shop that has a simular name.

roger
--
www.rogermerriman.com
  #10  
Old June 4th 08, 02:34 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
Clive George
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"Roger Merriman" wrote in message
k...

heh sa wouldn't be happy with a Birdy, she likes more sit up and beg
postions as do i to be honest for city bikes.


Eh? Birdy is pretty adjustable, and comes out fairly upright whatever. Have
you tried riding one?

(IMO and my wife's, it's a far better ride than the brompton. Not cheap
though :-( )

cheers,
clive


 




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