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Chain wear and cassette question



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 11th 18, 05:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 3:09:36 PM UTC-8, Gregory Sutter
wrote:
On 2018-11-10, Joerg wrote:

Getting older, I'd like to increase the large cog to at least 40T
from my current 32T. Of course, that will require me to retire
the trusty old Shimano 600 derailer. I don't want the cassette to
become ever wider and also need to maintain 7-speed spacing so I
can use the more robust old-style 7.3mm pin length chains such as
KMC Z50 (can't find the Sachs anymore). In the past I hacked
cassettes, installed the cogs I wanted and re-used the old
spacers. Can the larger cassettes like in the link below still be
hacked apart? I don't mind drilling or dremeling stuff to get
them apart. If memory serves me correctly I've installed a
Shimano STX-RC freehub on the road bike after the last UG freehub
had croaked.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SunRace-CSM...k/132325285327




This post makes me question a lot of things, including your sense of
time invested vs getting what you want no matter how the industry
has stopped doing it that way. Moving past that, though:

If you want to maintain 7sp spacing, then your hub has a 7sp
cassette body, probably HG with 31.9mm width. You should tell us
specifically what it is, though; widths vary, including the
also-7sp Shimano IG.

You've posted an 8sp cassette (36.5mm width). Photo #2 shows the
one silver and two black pins holding the cogs together. You
could think about using a drill press, I suppose, but looking at
photo #1 there looks like a color difference between the smallest 3
cogs and the rest, which adds to my suspicion that they're separate
from the larger pinned set. If that's so, then you can think about
omitting cogs and spacers to fit the smaller width of your cassette
body.

For the derailer, if your 600 is a GS (aka mid cage) instead of the
short one, which I assume it is due to your current 32t
configuration, then you might try keeping it and adding a Wolf
Tooth Roadlink. Making your bike one more bit of a hack should be
considered a central part of this quest, and that fits the bill
while hopefully allowing you to keep using existing equipment.

https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...ducts/roadlink



I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail and a
hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like the Sunrace
people are trying to accommodate the build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail or a
punch you'd bend cogs.


That Wolftooth is interesting and reminiscent of the new Shimano
derailleurs.
https://static.biketiresdirect.com/p...0/sh7rd1-1.jpg

Joerg needs a gravel bike, which he could get practically anywhere
for pretty cheap. Keep the economy strong! Use that giant Trump tax
savings!


Oh I would but then my wife would make me chuck the trusty old road bike
I had since 1982 and I can't bring myself to do that. Yet.


Yes, 11sp wears out more quickly, but it is smooth as butt-ah, and he
could get hydraulic discs for the super-duper scary road descents,
drunk drivers, mountain lions (I brake for mountain lions), etc.
Cameron Park demands discs!


No 11-speed, I want 7-speed robustness. As for discs, absolutely, rim
brakes are totally inferior to those. For a road/gravel bike I'd accept
non-hydraulic ones though. For the MTB it has to be hydraulics.


I was getting dragged around today by a friend who was on 35mm CX
tires and a CX race bike. I was on a Synapse with 28mm slicks. My
friend loves his CX race bike with wide range 11sp. It's like 16lbs.
We hit some straight up gravel, and he rode away on his little gears.
https://tinyurl.com/y7le55hm (steeper than it looks up that cut).



Out here that's considered a road. Don't need a gravel bike for that.
The bike path to Camino is like that. I just don't ride it with tires
that are near end of life.

BTW, the Zafiro you once dissed as short-lived surprised me. I've got my
last one on there right now and it's pushing past 1400mi which is
already 200mi beyond what cheap tires normally do in this area. The
square shape is quite extreme but no threads showing yet. Wish those had
TWI.


Cold but clear, and it warmed up a bit. Lots of scary cars on the way
home, but my disc brakes saved me. I would never ride a bike without
discs. I could die. Joerg is actually exposing himself to great
danger on that early '80s hose-clamp museum piece club racer of his.


It's not really a club racer, this bike was completely custom assembled
for me and the frame ordered to spec after they measured me like at a
taylor. But it's old now. The hose clamp still fulfills its job nicely.
The steerer never shook loose again in thousands of miles, including
some dirt paths.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
Ads
  #12  
Old November 11th 18, 05:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Posts: 3,819
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 11:09:53 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:

Snipped
I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail and a
hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like the Sunrace
people are trying to accommodate the build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail or a
punch you'd bend cogs.

Snipped

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


I've separated many cassette cogs by grinding of the heads of the pins behind the largest cog and then tapping the remaining pin until there was enough to grab with a pliers or small Vice-grip and pulled the pins out and I did that without EVER bending a cog. It only takes a tap to start the pin out once the head is ground off.

Cheers
  #13  
Old November 11th 18, 05:30 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,077
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 10:45:36 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 19:26, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

Maybe think about changing the crankset to smaller chainrings
instead?


That is the other option, getting a compact for a square-taper BB.
Requires a new derailer as well but for the front. However, I'd like to
keep the old 52T and 42T combo. When riding on the 30mi long bike path
between Sacramento and Folsom on a busier day that is just the right
combination for a quick downshift, to accelerate hard and pass another
cyclist, then shift back to the 52T ring.


You're doing a LOT of fussing at the rear derailleur to get one gear that's
maybe 25% lower. I think it's far easier mechanically to add a third "granny"
sprocket at the front. You can get even lower gears, and probably several of
them.

Triple cranks are easily available and many are not expensive. But if you're
committed to dinking around to save pennies, you can probably make or buy a
triple adapter to use with your existing double crank.

It was about 1982 that I installed my first triple crank on my 1972 Raleigh.
(At the time it was my only bike, used for commuting, time trialing, club rides
and touring. Now it's just my utility bike.) Anyway, I was on a ride with a
friend and he asked to try it on a steep hill. His remark: "Wow. It doesn't
matter if a hill is there or not!"

I didn't need to change my front derailleur. And I still had all my "normal"
gears.

- Frank Krygowski
  #14  
Old November 11th 18, 05:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,819
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 11:31:00 AM UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 10:45:36 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 19:26, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

Maybe think about changing the crankset to smaller chainrings
instead?


That is the other option, getting a compact for a square-taper BB.
Requires a new derailer as well but for the front. However, I'd like to
keep the old 52T and 42T combo. When riding on the 30mi long bike path
between Sacramento and Folsom on a busier day that is just the right
combination for a quick downshift, to accelerate hard and pass another
cyclist, then shift back to the 52T ring.


You're doing a LOT of fussing at the rear derailleur to get one gear that's
maybe 25% lower. I think it's far easier mechanically to add a third "granny"
sprocket at the front. You can get even lower gears, and probably several of
them.

Triple cranks are easily available and many are not expensive. But if you're
committed to dinking around to save pennies, you can probably make or buy a
triple adapter to use with your existing double crank.

It was about 1982 that I installed my first triple crank on my 1972 Raleigh.
(At the time it was my only bike, used for commuting, time trialing, club rides
and touring. Now it's just my utility bike.) Anyway, I was on a ride with a
friend and he asked to try it on a steep hill. His remark: "Wow. It doesn't
matter if a hill is there or not!"

I didn't need to change my front derailleur. And I still had all my "normal"
gears.

- Frank Krygowski


Even a 30 teeth inner chainring on a 42 - 52 teeth setup makes a BIG difference.

42 x 40 is 28.4 gear inches and 30 (front) x 32 (rear) is 25.3 gear inches.

I LOVE my road triple.

Cheers
  #15  
Old November 11th 18, 06:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On 2018-11-11 08:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 11:09:53 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:

Snipped
I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail and
a hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like the
Sunrace people are trying to accommodate the build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail or
a punch you'd bend cogs.

Snipped

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


I've separated many cassette cogs by grinding of the heads of the
pins behind the largest cog and then tapping the remaining pin until
there was enough to grab with a pliers or small Vice-grip and pulled
the pins out and I did that without EVER bending a cog. It only takes
a tap to start the pin out once the head is ground off.


That's what I meant. They have to either be ground off or drilled. Then
they can either be punched out the rest of the way with very little
force or grabbed with pliers. In the old days there were three long
screws which saved a couple of minute during that job. It's easy either
way as long as they didn't cluster the largest cogs onto a spider.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #16  
Old November 11th 18, 10:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,500
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 8:09:53 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 3:09:36 PM UTC-8, Gregory Sutter
wrote:
On 2018-11-10, Joerg wrote:

Getting older, I'd like to increase the large cog to at least 40T
from my current 32T. Of course, that will require me to retire
the trusty old Shimano 600 derailer. I don't want the cassette to
become ever wider and also need to maintain 7-speed spacing so I
can use the more robust old-style 7.3mm pin length chains such as
KMC Z50 (can't find the Sachs anymore). In the past I hacked
cassettes, installed the cogs I wanted and re-used the old
spacers. Can the larger cassettes like in the link below still be
hacked apart? I don't mind drilling or dremeling stuff to get
them apart. If memory serves me correctly I've installed a
Shimano STX-RC freehub on the road bike after the last UG freehub
had croaked.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SunRace-CSM...k/132325285327



This post makes me question a lot of things, including your sense of
time invested vs getting what you want no matter how the industry
has stopped doing it that way. Moving past that, though:

If you want to maintain 7sp spacing, then your hub has a 7sp
cassette body, probably HG with 31.9mm width. You should tell us
specifically what it is, though; widths vary, including the
also-7sp Shimano IG.

You've posted an 8sp cassette (36.5mm width). Photo #2 shows the
one silver and two black pins holding the cogs together. You
could think about using a drill press, I suppose, but looking at
photo #1 there looks like a color difference between the smallest 3
cogs and the rest, which adds to my suspicion that they're separate
from the larger pinned set. If that's so, then you can think about
omitting cogs and spacers to fit the smaller width of your cassette
body.

For the derailer, if your 600 is a GS (aka mid cage) instead of the
short one, which I assume it is due to your current 32t
configuration, then you might try keeping it and adding a Wolf
Tooth Roadlink. Making your bike one more bit of a hack should be
considered a central part of this quest, and that fits the bill
while hopefully allowing you to keep using existing equipment.

https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...ducts/roadlink



I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail and a
hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like the Sunrace
people are trying to accommodate the build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail or a
punch you'd bend cogs.


Not if they're just press fit pins, but who knows. You need to write to the manufacturer.


That Wolftooth is interesting and reminiscent of the new Shimano
derailleurs.
https://static.biketiresdirect.com/p...0/sh7rd1-1.jpg

Joerg needs a gravel bike, which he could get practically anywhere
for pretty cheap. Keep the economy strong! Use that giant Trump tax
savings!


Oh I would but then my wife would make me chuck the trusty old road bike
I had since 1982 and I can't bring myself to do that. Yet.


God knows why.


Yes, 11sp wears out more quickly, but it is smooth as butt-ah, and he
could get hydraulic discs for the super-duper scary road descents,
drunk drivers, mountain lions (I brake for mountain lions), etc.
Cameron Park demands discs!


No 11-speed, I want 7-speed robustness. As for discs, absolutely, rim
brakes are totally inferior to those. For a road/gravel bike I'd accept
non-hydraulic ones though. For the MTB it has to be hydraulics.


I was getting dragged around today by a friend who was on 35mm CX
tires and a CX race bike. I was on a Synapse with 28mm slicks. My
friend loves his CX race bike with wide range 11sp. It's like 16lbs.
We hit some straight up gravel, and he rode away on his little gears.
https://tinyurl.com/y7le55hm (steeper than it looks up that cut).



Out here that's considered a road. Don't need a gravel bike for that.
The bike path to Camino is like that. I just don't ride it with tires
that are near end of life.


It's kind of a road here, too. My point is that low gears and fat tires make for a more versatile bike -- and those are two things you can't get on your current bike. You'll never be able to use a 30mm tire, and you're looking at a lot of kludges to get the low gear you want.


BTW, the Zafiro you once dissed as short-lived surprised me. I've got my
last one on there right now and it's pushing past 1400mi which is
already 200mi beyond what cheap tires normally do in this area. The
square shape is quite extreme but no threads showing yet. Wish those had
TWI.


Hmmm. I'm not impressed with them, and their flat resistance is not good. With that said, I still have a pair from last year that I will put on soon -- 32mm for wet-leaf season commuting. I do like the file-ish tread.


Cold but clear, and it warmed up a bit. Lots of scary cars on the way
home, but my disc brakes saved me. I would never ride a bike without
discs. I could die. Joerg is actually exposing himself to great
danger on that early '80s hose-clamp museum piece club racer of his.


It's not really a club racer, this bike was completely custom assembled
for me and the frame ordered to spec after they measured me like at a
taylor. But it's old now. The hose clamp still fulfills its job nicely.
The steerer never shook loose again in thousands of miles, including
some dirt paths.


Neither does mine, and I commute on at least some dirt every work day, including a 20% dirt climb made possible with some reasonably low gears and fatter tires. I spin out on my regular road bike.

Ride area today: https://d18d6vfm63ukth.cloudfront.ne...eyardsFall.jpg More sun and spectacular fall colors. Riding the Emonda was like being on an eBike compared to my commuter and even the Synapse. Nothing like a nice light bike to go mano a mano with the other old dudes. I specifically dis-invited my son so the curmudgeons could convince themselves they were still fast.

-- Jay Beattie.

  #17  
Old November 11th 18, 10:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,819
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 12:50:29 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-11 08:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 11:09:53 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:

Snipped
I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail and
a hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like the
Sunrace people are trying to accommodate the build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail or
a punch you'd bend cogs.

Snipped

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


I've separated many cassette cogs by grinding of the heads of the
pins behind the largest cog and then tapping the remaining pin until
there was enough to grab with a pliers or small Vice-grip and pulled
the pins out and I did that without EVER bending a cog. It only takes
a tap to start the pin out once the head is ground off.


That's what I meant. They have to either be ground off or drilled. Then
they can either be punched out the rest of the way with very little
force or grabbed with pliers. In the old days there were three long
screws which saved a couple of minute during that job. It's easy either
way as long as they didn't cluster the largest cogs onto a spider.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


You do NOT need to drill out the entire pin. All you need to do is grind or even file off the end that's on the outside of the largest cog. I've done both. Then you simply place your punch or even a nail against the pin that's still in the hole and then gently tap the punch or nail to start the pinb out. When it's started you simply turn the cogset over and pull out the remaining pin. It takes but a few seconds once the pin heads are off to extract those pins. You do NOT need a massive hammer/rock or a lot of force. There's absolutely no reason why you should bend any cog whilst getting the pins out. Unless of course you don't remove the heads of the pins first that is.

Sheesh but some people make a simple thing sound like such a difficult chore.

Cheers
  #18  
Old November 11th 18, 11:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On 2018-11-11 13:05, jbeattie wrote:
On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 8:09:53 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, November 10, 2018 at 3:09:36 PM UTC-8, Gregory
Sutter wrote:
On 2018-11-10, Joerg wrote:

Getting older, I'd like to increase the large cog to at least
40T from my current 32T. Of course, that will require me to
retire the trusty old Shimano 600 derailer. I don't want the
cassette to become ever wider and also need to maintain
7-speed spacing so I can use the more robust old-style 7.3mm
pin length chains such as KMC Z50 (can't find the Sachs
anymore). In the past I hacked cassettes, installed the cogs
I wanted and re-used the old spacers. Can the larger
cassettes like in the link below still be hacked apart? I
don't mind drilling or dremeling stuff to get them apart. If
memory serves me correctly I've installed a Shimano STX-RC
freehub on the road bike after the last UG freehub had
croaked.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/SunRace-CSM...k/132325285327





This post makes me question a lot of things, including your sense of
time invested vs getting what you want no matter how the
industry has stopped doing it that way. Moving past that,
though:

If you want to maintain 7sp spacing, then your hub has a 7sp
cassette body, probably HG with 31.9mm width. You should tell
us specifically what it is, though; widths vary, including the
also-7sp Shimano IG.

You've posted an 8sp cassette (36.5mm width). Photo #2 shows
the one silver and two black pins holding the cogs together.
You could think about using a drill press, I suppose, but
looking at photo #1 there looks like a color difference between
the smallest 3 cogs and the rest, which adds to my suspicion
that they're separate from the larger pinned set. If that's
so, then you can think about omitting cogs and spacers to fit
the smaller width of your cassette body.

For the derailer, if your 600 is a GS (aka mid cage) instead of
the short one, which I assume it is due to your current 32t
configuration, then you might try keeping it and adding a Wolf
Tooth Roadlink. Making your bike one more bit of a hack should
be considered a central part of this quest, and that fits the
bill while hopefully allowing you to keep using existing
equipment.

https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...ducts/roadlink




I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail and a
hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like the
Sunrace people are trying to accommodate the build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail or
a punch you'd bend cogs.


Not if they're just press fit pins, but who knows. You need to write
to the manufacturer.



IME they will not comment on unorthodox uses of their products. Even in
my job that's tedious, when I want to use an electronic integrated
circuit in an unusual way and seven-digit revenue is beckoning.




That Wolftooth is interesting and reminiscent of the new Shimano
derailleurs.
https://static.biketiresdirect.com/p...0/sh7rd1-1.jpg



Joerg needs a gravel bike, which he could get practically anywhere
for pretty cheap. Keep the economy strong! Use that giant Trump
tax savings!


Oh I would but then my wife would make me chuck the trusty old road
bike I had since 1982 and I can't bring myself to do that. Yet.


God knows why.



Maybe a bit of nostalgia but most of all I do not like to ditch stuff
that is still perfectly working. Just like a former colleague who used a
1954 Chevy pickup truck as his daily driver. On days when he didn't have
anything to pick up from Home Depot he often used their early 50's Chevy
Bel Air. Both surprisingly low maintenance.

Oh, did I mention that I still have a candy bar phone? For the
youngsters: These were pre-flip-phone. My big drill is much older than I
am and works just fine:

http://analogconsultants.com/ng/sed/olddrill.JPG


Yes, 11sp wears out more quickly, but it is smooth as butt-ah,
and he could get hydraulic discs for the super-duper scary road
descents, drunk drivers, mountain lions (I brake for mountain
lions), etc. Cameron Park demands discs!


No 11-speed, I want 7-speed robustness. As for discs, absolutely,
rim brakes are totally inferior to those. For a road/gravel bike
I'd accept non-hydraulic ones though. For the MTB it has to be
hydraulics.


I was getting dragged around today by a friend who was on 35mm
CX tires and a CX race bike. I was on a Synapse with 28mm
slicks. My friend loves his CX race bike with wide range 11sp.
It's like 16lbs. We hit some straight up gravel, and he rode away
on his little gears. https://tinyurl.com/y7le55hm (steeper than
it looks up that cut).



Out here that's considered a road. Don't need a gravel bike for
that. The bike path to Camino is like that. I just don't ride it
with tires that are near end of life.


It's kind of a road here, too. My point is that low gears and fat
tires make for a more versatile bike -- and those are two things you
can't get on your current bike. You'll never be able to use a 30mm
tire, and you're looking at a lot of kludges to get the low gear you
want.


Correct. That's my only gripe with the frame of that old road bike. Even
28mm would be tight and requires the wheel to be 100% true which it
never really is. For some reason my friend's 1972 Peugeot PX-10 looks
like it could take a 32mm cyclocross tire.

And, not disc brake mounts.


BTW, the Zafiro you once dissed as short-lived surprised me. I've
got my last one on there right now and it's pushing past 1400mi
which is already 200mi beyond what cheap tires normally do in this
area. The square shape is quite extreme but no threads showing yet.
Wish those had TWI.


Hmmm. I'm not impressed with them, and their flat resistance is not
good. With that said, I still have a pair from last year that I will
put on soon -- 32mm for wet-leaf season commuting. I do like the
file-ish tread.



Mine are 25mm slicks. I've got a Mr.Tuffy liner in there plus thick
thorn-resistant tubes so I (hopefully) safely test the limits.



Cold but clear, and it warmed up a bit. Lots of scary cars on the
way home, but my disc brakes saved me. I would never ride a bike
without discs. I could die. Joerg is actually exposing himself
to great danger on that early '80s hose-clamp museum piece club
racer of his.


It's not really a club racer, this bike was completely custom
assembled for me and the frame ordered to spec after they measured
me like at a taylor. But it's old now. The hose clamp still
fulfills its job nicely. The steerer never shook loose again in
thousands of miles, including some dirt paths.


Neither does mine, and I commute on at least some dirt every work
day, including a 20% dirt climb made possible with some reasonably
low gears and fatter tires. I spin out on my regular road bike.

Ride area today:
https://d18d6vfm63ukth.cloudfront.ne...eyardsFall.jpg
More sun and spectacular fall colors. Riding the Emonda was like
being on an eBike compared to my commuter and even the Synapse.
Nothing like a nice light bike to go mano a mano with the other old
dudes.



Nice. I went through vineyards on Friday. Very large almost industrial
ones. Merlot almost as far as the eye can see.

https://goo.gl/maps/VqoZQGF19T42

However, getting into the Highway 50 corridor on the way back I started
coughing badly because of the Camp Fire smoke. Today it got so bad that
I couldn't ride at all and same tomorrow. On the news they said that a
couple hours of exercise would be the equivalent of smoking half a pack
of cigarettes. Probably worse because the smoke contains fumes for over
6000 burnt residence, whatever was in them. Very weird smell.


... I specifically dis-invited my son so the curmudgeons could
convince themselves they were still fast.


This is why I don't ride with the owner of a client business. He puts
the hammer down and keeps it at 25mph, something I just can't do for
more than 20mins and even then my tongue is on the handlebar. An
embarrassing fact is that he is two years older.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #19  
Old November 11th 18, 11:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On 2018-11-11 13:24, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 12:50:29 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-11 08:21, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Sunday, November 11, 2018 at 11:09:53 AM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-11-10 17:06, jbeattie wrote:
Snipped
I think the pins could be removed with Joerg's patented nail
and a hammer, and the silver pin is a screw. It looks like
the Sunrace people are trying to accommodate the
build-a-beater set.


If they aren't screws they have to be drilled out. With a nail
or a punch you'd bend cogs.
Snipped

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/

I've separated many cassette cogs by grinding of the heads of
the pins behind the largest cog and then tapping the remaining
pin until there was enough to grab with a pliers or small
Vice-grip and pulled the pins out and I did that without EVER
bending a cog. It only takes a tap to start the pin out once the
head is ground off.


That's what I meant. They have to either be ground off or drilled.
Then they can either be punched out the rest of the way with very
little force or grabbed with pliers. In the old days there were
three long screws which saved a couple of minute during that job.
It's easy either way as long as they didn't cluster the largest
cogs onto a spider.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


You do NOT need to drill out the entire pin. All you need to do is
grind or even file off the end that's on the outside of the largest
cog. I've done both.



On some cassettes that pin is just a glorified long rivet and hollow.
Easily drilled out, takes a few seconds to drill the head off and then
it almsot falls out by itself.


... Then you simply place your punch or even a nail
against the pin that's still in the hole and then gently tap the
punch or nail to start the pinb out. When it's started you simply
turn the cogset over and pull out the remaining pin. It takes but a
few seconds once the pin heads are off to extract those pins. You do
NOT need a massive hammer/rock or a lot of force. There's absolutely
no reason why you should bend any cog whilst getting the pins out.
Unless of course you don't remove the heads of the pins first that
is.

Sheesh but some people make a simple thing sound like such a
difficult chore.


It depends on how old a cassette is and whether the bike has seen a lot
of rain, salt and snow. I've had pins in old cassettes I wanted to
salvage cogs from that would not budge at all until I gave them a good
whack (after drilling off a head).

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #20  
Old November 12th 18, 03:59 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,434
Default Chain wear and cassette question

On 11/11/2018 4:05 PM, jbeattie wrote:
My point is that low gears and fat tires make for a more versatile bike -- and those are two things you can't get on your current bike. You'll never be able to use a 30mm tire,


I wonder if that's really true. That 1972 Raleigh I still use for some
rides has 32mm (AKA 1 1/4") tires on it right now, with no problems.

and you're looking at a lot of kludges to get the low gear you want.


The low gear on my Raleigh is 25 gear inches, on an antique system of
"half step plus granny" chainrings. 31 tooth "granny" sprocket, 34 tooth
rear. Since the crankset is a TA copy, I could probably put on a 26
tooth front cog if I wanted.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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