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Dirty Dozen 2018



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 29th 18, 02:27 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
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Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 16:29:07 -0800 (PST), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 3:53:58 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
Snipped
I see people doing hill repeats in the cemetery, and it gives me a longing for the past when it was just me and the dead-bodies. Going down: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zh1r4_QX1E After the route "officially" opened to cyclists, it turned into a crowd scene -- so much so that it was banned as a segment on Strava to reduce racing up or down (it hasn't).

Snipped

I like how the guy riding through that cemetery where there is no one visible for most if not all of the video feels that he has to have a bright flashing light on.

Cheers


It is a proven fact that a bright flashing light keeps the ghosts away
:-)

cheers,

John B.


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  #12  
Old November 30th 18, 01:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.


But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.

  #13  
Old November 30th 18, 03:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
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Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On 30/11/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.


But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


and no downhills...
  #14  
Old November 30th 18, 04:59 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 493
Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 30/11/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.


But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


and no downhills...


Frank is more the touring type which means that he doesn't like either uphills or down. Neither do I when I'm touring.
  #15  
Old November 30th 18, 06:22 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On 11/30/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.


But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


Our first century ride took place on a rather flat route among the
Appalachian foothills. We had no major climbs, but had the view of the
hills all around us. I liked that quite a lot.

I think part of my dislike of climbing is the contour of the hills in
the area. I live where the glaciers stopped, so going south or east gets
into piles of short steep hills. They're often very tough to get up, and
the downhills are too fast and short to really enjoy. (We had similar
experiences cycling in Devon, UK many decades ago.)

Cycling in the western U.S. was different. We had low gears on our
touring bikes, so we'd just downshift and climb all day at maybe 8 to 10
mph. Once at the top of the pass, the rewards were great views and long,
long downhills.

BTW, we host Warm Showers touring cyclists. One couple retired in the
San Franscisco area, then rode to Maine to celebrate. Once in Maine they
decided they were having too much fun to quit so they headed southwest,
passing through western Pennsylvania.

When they checked into our house just over the border from Pennsylvania,
they said the hills of Western PA were the toughest riding they had ever
done.

I said "I know."

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #16  
Old December 1st 18, 01:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 293
Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 4:59:43 PM UTC+1, wrote:
On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 30/11/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.

But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


and no downhills...


Frank is more the touring type which means that he doesn't like either uphills or down. Neither do I when I'm touring.


Hills are only a problem when you don't have the right gear or want to go faster than you can otherwise they are a very nice for recreational riding. Living in a flat country I envy you all. Count you blessings.

Lou
  #17  
Old December 1st 18, 11:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,500
Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 9:22:05 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/30/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.


But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


Our first century ride took place on a rather flat route among the
Appalachian foothills. We had no major climbs, but had the view of the
hills all around us. I liked that quite a lot.

I think part of my dislike of climbing is the contour of the hills in
the area. I live where the glaciers stopped, so going south or east gets
into piles of short steep hills. They're often very tough to get up, and
the downhills are too fast and short to really enjoy. (We had similar
experiences cycling in Devon, UK many decades ago.)

Cycling in the western U.S. was different. We had low gears on our
touring bikes, so we'd just downshift and climb all day at maybe 8 to 10
mph. Once at the top of the pass, the rewards were great views and long,
long downhills.

BTW, we host Warm Showers touring cyclists. One couple retired in the
San Franscisco area, then rode to Maine to celebrate. Once in Maine they
decided they were having too much fun to quit so they headed southwest,
passing through western Pennsylvania.

When they checked into our house just over the border from Pennsylvania,
they said the hills of Western PA were the toughest riding they had ever
done.

I said "I know."


Wasn't Warm Showers part of the Steele Dossier? Totally OT, but I was riding across southern Illinois and stopped somewhere near Carbondale at a KOA or some camp-dump that was where we ran out of gas and figured we would stop.. The next morning, we ride maybe two or three miles east, through a pleasant neighborhood and there is a Grant Wood-esque husband and wife running a mini-hostel/shower facility for cyclists. He was on the front lawn when we rode by and corralled us into stopping for a sweet roll -- or part of one. As I recall, it was the sort of fare you got in the parish hall after Sunday service. Nice cozy home where we could have stayed instead of some miserable urban camp site. Pre-internet, I can only wonder how they informed riders of their operation. They weren't in our used Bikecentennial tour book..

-- Jay Beattie.




  #18  
Old December 1st 18, 11:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 493
Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On Saturday, December 1, 2018 at 4:45:16 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 4:59:43 PM UTC+1, wrote:
On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 30/11/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.

But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


and no downhills...


Frank is more the touring type which means that he doesn't like either uphills or down. Neither do I when I'm touring.


Hills are only a problem when you don't have the right gear or want to go faster than you can otherwise they are a very nice for recreational riding.. Living in a flat country I envy you all. Count you blessings.

Lou


Some of those climbs are 18% and recreational riders don't do those very well no matter how your gears are. At some point you start losing more from the length of time it take to get up a hill than if you gut it out and climb in a higher gear. For me that point is anything 12% or less can get climbed in a 34-25.
  #19  
Old December 2nd 18, 02:46 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,434
Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On 12/1/2018 5:10 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 9:22:05 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/30/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.

But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


Our first century ride took place on a rather flat route among the
Appalachian foothills. We had no major climbs, but had the view of the
hills all around us. I liked that quite a lot.

I think part of my dislike of climbing is the contour of the hills in
the area. I live where the glaciers stopped, so going south or east gets
into piles of short steep hills. They're often very tough to get up, and
the downhills are too fast and short to really enjoy. (We had similar
experiences cycling in Devon, UK many decades ago.)

Cycling in the western U.S. was different. We had low gears on our
touring bikes, so we'd just downshift and climb all day at maybe 8 to 10
mph. Once at the top of the pass, the rewards were great views and long,
long downhills.

BTW, we host Warm Showers touring cyclists. One couple retired in the
San Franscisco area, then rode to Maine to celebrate. Once in Maine they
decided they were having too much fun to quit so they headed southwest,
passing through western Pennsylvania.

When they checked into our house just over the border from Pennsylvania,
they said the hills of Western PA were the toughest riding they had ever
done.

I said "I know."


Wasn't Warm Showers part of the Steele Dossier? Totally OT, but I was riding across southern Illinois and stopped somewhere near Carbondale at a KOA or some camp-dump that was where we ran out of gas and figured we would stop. The next morning, we ride maybe two or three miles east, through a pleasant neighborhood and there is a Grant Wood-esque husband and wife running a mini-hostel/shower facility for cyclists. He was on the front lawn when we rode by and corralled us into stopping for a sweet roll -- or part of one. As I recall, it was the sort of fare you got in the parish hall after Sunday service. Nice cozy home where we could have stayed instead of some miserable urban camp site. Pre-internet, I can only wonder how they informed riders of their operation. They weren't in our used Bikecentennial tour book.


We've used Warm Showers to find shelter only a few times, but I remember
two of those times that were critically helpful. Once was in Zurich
Switzerland, at the end of a long vacation traveling by bike and train.
During the train ride in, we were told "Zurich is full!" and indeed,
there were many dozens of people lined up at Tourist Info desperately
seeking lodging. A nice young couple was happy to host us despite our
last-minute phone call.

Another time was during a much more recent across-Ohio tour, credit card
touring. There are places even in Ohio where there are no motels or B&Bs
for many miles. We filled one of those gaps by staying in a Warm Showers
camping trailer in someone's yard, and got a first class tour of the
fire station as a bonus. (The WS host was the fire chief.)

These days, I suppose we could look for an Airbnb. But Warm Showers is
worth supporting. We've had great fun hosting dozens of cyclists over
the years. In our experience, touring cyclists seem to be very pleasant
people, and most are extremely interesting as well.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #20  
Old December 2nd 18, 02:49 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,434
Default Dirty Dozen 2018

On 12/1/2018 5:34 PM, wrote:
On Saturday, December 1, 2018 at 4:45:16 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 4:59:43 PM UTC+1, wrote:
On Friday, November 30, 2018 at 6:22:16 AM UTC-8, duane wrote:
On 30/11/2018 7:57 AM, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 28 Nov 2018 14:46:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski wrote:


I once had an article published in _Bicycling_ magazine about using USGS
topo maps for cycling. A major theme was how to avoid hills.

But if you don't go up hills, there are no views.


and no downhills...

Frank is more the touring type which means that he doesn't like either uphills or down. Neither do I when I'm touring.


Hills are only a problem when you don't have the right gear or want to go faster than you can otherwise they are a very nice for recreational riding. Living in a flat country I envy you all. Count you blessings.

Lou


Some of those climbs are 18% and recreational riders don't do those very well no matter how your gears are. At some point you start losing more from the length of time it take to get up a hill than if you gut it out and climb in a higher gear. For me that point is anything 12% or less can get climbed in a 34-25.


For me, it depends on the ride. If I'm just doing a normal recreational
day ride, I'm fine with attacking a hill, i.e. going hard to get up it.
But if I'm doing an unusually long ride or doing a multi-day ride, my
priority is to make it easy on myself. I downshift at the first
indication of increased effort.

--
- Frank Krygowski
 




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