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A nice story from Jim Lockwood



 
 
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  #1  
Old December 3rd 07, 11:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Nakashima
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Posts: 497
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood

http://www.thespincycle.com/trips.as...eatest_cyclist
-tom


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  #2  
Old December 4th 07, 12:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
datakoll
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Posts: 7,793
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood



http://www.villagesoup.com//Communit...storyid=104118
  #3  
Old December 4th 07, 01:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
datakoll
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Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood



http://www.fatcyclist.com/wp-content...mme%5B7%5D.jpg
  #4  
Old December 4th 07, 02:24 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood

On Mon, 3 Dec 2007 14:06:39 -0800, "Tom Nakashima"
wrote:

http://www.thespincycle.com/trips.as...eatest_cyclist
-tom


Dear Tom,

Here's the link that James Thomson recently posted to the details of
Merckx's hour bike:


http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Ben..._B-guide_1.htm

Mexico City is at about 7,350 feet, so yes a rider will go noticeably
faster. The defaults for this calculator predict 22.77 mph at sea
level:

http://austinimage.com/bp/velocity/velocity.html

Raise the elevation to 7,350 feet and the speed prediction rises to
25.19 mph, about 10% faster.

Someone who pedals daily around the Arkansas River at about 4,900 feet
enjoys a predicted 24.36 mph and a 1.6 mph advantage.

Of course, thinner air might reduce the rider's aerobic function and
power.

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
  #5  
Old December 4th 07, 04:47 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
datakoll
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Posts: 7,793
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood


Carl,

not to leave the topic but where is the Arkansas at 4,900' ? Decimal
Degrees?
During you cyber travels, have you stumbled over a comprehensive
American rivers map or program?

g. daniels
  #6  
Old December 4th 07, 05:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
datakoll
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Posts: 7,793
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood



SIMLA !

say do know know which crick runs green?
  #7  
Old December 4th 07, 06:11 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood

On Mon, 3 Dec 2007 19:47:32 -0800 (PST), datakoll
wrote:


Carl,

not to leave the topic but where is the Arkansas at 4,900' ? Decimal
Degrees?
During your cyber travels, have you stumbled over a comprehensive
American rivers map or program?

g. daniels


Dear Gene,

The Arkansas River is at 4,900 about half-way down the face of the dam
at the Pueblo Reservoir:


http://www.crh.noaa.gov/ahps2/river....i ver+Page%21

My daily ride goes west up the river to the dam, up to the top of the
south side of the dam, about 200 feet more up the ridge west of town,
and then back down along the south river bank again and up onto the
bluffs:

http://i19.tinypic.com/4kynamo.jpg

I'm sitting at the 4750 foot contour line on top of the south bluffs
here, where the line goes rightward into the gray residential zone:


http://terraserver.microsoft.com/ima...28&Y=10589&W=3

My daily ride drops about 50 feet down to the river, shown as 4697 at
the upper left, then climbs to about 5100 feet, so 4900 is about
average.

Water flow and reservoir height readings may matter more in arid
south-east Colorado than in Florida:

http://i4.tinypic.com/7yrl0fa.jpg

The daily report this morning shows the Pueblo Reservoir at 4858.10
feet, John Martin Reservoir downstream at 3805.13. The precision seems
absurd until you realize how much water a hundredth of an inch rise
means to dry-land farmers from here to the Mississipi when the
reservoirs cover dozens of square miles. Colorado and Kansas lawyers
spend their lives squabbling over water rights.

As for detailed elevations of rivers, I don't know of any specific
maps, but the high-resolution topo contour lines on the maps at
http://terraserver.microsoft.com will get you reasonably good
information.

Cheers,

Carl Fogel
  #8  
Old December 4th 07, 02:09 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
datakoll
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Posts: 7,793
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood

Interesting riding.
Can you recommend all star downhills? for total ambience not sheer
drop or max speed.

I down l;oa76=((EXded google ert yesterday so river tracking was
easier than Gmaps.
the river track seems easy: algorithm wall depth wall, label with
name( muddy, white green, kikapoo, brule, elk fox...), project. I
don't know about cross section for altitude/drop: wether that's
derived or developed. Next week.

water here is the big deal. Tho sand perks, the lay is flat so once
fallen water doesn't run it just sits there. That's what all the
ditching was about. Collier, remember? Advertising: faster lower
longer wider no cypress trees, no Everglades, no Florida Bay.

My pet NOAA dam is the one a Sidney Lanier.

I guess I'll drive thru and ask about the green crick
  #9  
Old December 4th 07, 04:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Nakashima
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 497
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood


wrote in message
...
On Mon, 3 Dec 2007 14:06:39 -0800, "Tom Nakashima"
wrote:

http://www.thespincycle.com/trips.as...eatest_cyclist
-tom


Dear Tom,

Here's the link that James Thomson recently posted to the details of
Merckx's hour bike:


http://www.classicrendezvous.com/Ben..._B-guide_1.htm

Mexico City is at about 7,350 feet, so yes a rider will go noticeably
faster. The defaults for this calculator predict 22.77 mph at sea
level:

http://austinimage.com/bp/velocity/velocity.html

Raise the elevation to 7,350 feet and the speed prediction rises to
25.19 mph, about 10% faster.

Someone who pedals daily around the Arkansas River at about 4,900 feet
enjoys a predicted 24.36 mph and a 1.6 mph advantage.

Of course, thinner air might reduce the rider's aerobic function and
power.

Cheers,

Carl Fogel


There will always be "loop holes", Carl, in any type of record settings.
I love Merckx because he did it without all the aero stuff.
Also enjoyed Indurain breaking the hour record in 1994 with one of the
poorest form I've ever seen. Just to think, if only he had great form.
It's sort of have been a tradition for the winner of the Tour de France
to consider the "Hour Record". Waiting for your man; "TT/Climber
Specialist" Lance to do it.
-tom


  #10  
Old December 4th 07, 04:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
datakoll
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Posts: 7,793
Default A nice story from Jim Lockwood



Mexico, Italy, Denmark, Belgium, France...
Indianapolis? too much advertising visibility?

 




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