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Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution



 
 
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  #11  
Old April 12th 18, 12:13 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,281
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 4/10/2018 7:04 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 9:39:31 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday I discovered my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare tube and needed to leave within minutes. Pulled off the clincher tire and tube and put on a spare tubular tire I had hanging around. Worked perfectly and allowed me to make the appointment on time. Weird combination = tubular tire on a clincher rim but it worked well enough to get me to and from the appointment.

Cheers


O.K., you do understand that the amazing part of this story is that you didn't have a spare tube but you had a tubular tire sitting around?


I think that a significant part of my garage is taken up with spare
tubes. Recently bought a load of high-end tubes when I could get them at
60% off retail. It's morally wrong to pay more than $3 for a tube but if
you have to buy them on the spur of the moment you can pay $10 each.
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  #12  
Old April 12th 18, 01:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,219
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at 4:13:23 PM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 4/10/2018 7:04 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 9:39:31 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday I discovered my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare tube and needed to leave within minutes. Pulled off the clincher tire and tube and put on a spare tubular tire I had hanging around. Worked perfectly and allowed me to make the appointment on time. Weird combination = tubular tire on a clincher rim but it worked well enough to get me to and from the appointment.

Cheers


O.K., you do understand that the amazing part of this story is that you didn't have a spare tube but you had a tubular tire sitting around?


I think that a significant part of my garage is taken up with spare
tubes. Recently bought a load of high-end tubes when I could get them at
60% off retail. It's morally wrong to pay more than $3 for a tube but if
you have to buy them on the spur of the moment you can pay $10 each.


Bike Gallery just had its annual sale with standard tubes for $2 a pop, but I was in SLC and missed the sale. I'll have to make due until next year.

-- Jay Beattie.





  #13  
Old April 12th 18, 01:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
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Posts: 8,281
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 4/11/2018 5:15 PM, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at 4:13:23 PM UTC-7, sms wrote:
On 4/10/2018 7:04 AM, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 9:39:31 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday I discovered my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare tube and needed to leave within minutes. Pulled off the clincher tire and tube and put on a spare tubular tire I had hanging around. Worked perfectly and allowed me to make the appointment on time. Weird combination = tubular tire on a clincher rim but it worked well enough to get me to and from the appointment.

Cheers

O.K., you do understand that the amazing part of this story is that you didn't have a spare tube but you had a tubular tire sitting around?


I think that a significant part of my garage is taken up with spare
tubes. Recently bought a load of high-end tubes when I could get them at
60% off retail. It's morally wrong to pay more than $3 for a tube but if
you have to buy them on the spur of the moment you can pay $10 each.


Bike Gallery just had its annual sale with standard tubes for $2 a pop, but I was in SLC and missed the sale. I'll have to make due until next year.


Are those generic Chinese tubes, i.e. Q-Tubes? $2 is a good price. A
shop is likely paying at least $1.25 for those tubes.
  #14  
Old April 12th 18, 03:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,044
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 4/11/2018 4:58 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-10 21:08, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 11:26:54 AM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 21:39:29 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday I discovered
my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare tube and needed to leave
within minutes. Pulled off the clincher tire and tube and put on a
spare tubular tire I had hanging around. Worked perfectly and
allowed me to make the appointment on time. Weird combination =
tubular tire on a clincher rim but it worked well enough to get me
to and from the appointment.
Cheers

Ummm... perhaps you should carry some duct tape.* There are some
articles and a few videos on how it's done.
https://www.google.com/search?q=duct+tape+bicycle+tire+patch
I've only used it once, on someone elses tire, because the rubber
cement had dried out in three out of three patch kits available.* It
apparently worked as there were no threatening messages on my
answering machine when I returned home.* The only real tricks that I
recall are to make sure the tube doesn't have any crud or baby powder
on the surface, and to NOT wrap the tape all the way around the tube
so that the tube can expand when pressurized.

I don't think it would have worked with narrow high pressure tires.
The one I patched was only pressurized to about 50(?) lbs.* I don't
think the duct tape patch would have held at 100 lbs.



On one long tour, our Continental Top Touring tires developed worrying
bubbles
in the sidewalls.



Is that a Conti problem? I had similar issue with Gatorskins. Two failed
prematurely when their sidewalls started to give up.


During the year of that tour (2003) I think it was a pretty common
problem with Continental tires. I don't know if it still is.

IIRC, I did later find that I'd been overinflating the tires.



******* ... This was in remote North Dakota. I reinforced the system by
wrapping the tubes loosely with duct tape. I was trying to approximate
the
diameter of the inflated tubes. I can't say for sure it worked, but we
didn't
suffer any blowouts.


And then you fret about my hose clamp fix :-)

http://www.analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Hoseclamp.JPG

It still works ...


If you told me you used a hose clamp to keep your headset adjusted for a
week when crossing remote North Dakota, I'd say it was fine.

When you brag about permanently using a hose clamp instead of proper
hardware, I call it a kludge.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #15  
Old April 12th 18, 03:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,299
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 2018-04-11 19:39, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/11/2018 4:58 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-10 21:08, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 11:26:54 AM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 21:39:29 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday I
discovered my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare tube and
needed to leave within minutes. Pulled off the clincher tire and
tube and put on a spare tubular tire I had hanging around. Worked
perfectly and allowed me to make the appointment on time. Weird
combination = tubular tire on a clincher rim but it worked well
enough to get me to and from the appointment.
Cheers

Ummm... perhaps you should carry some duct tape. There are some
articles and a few videos on how it's done.
https://www.google.com/search?q=duct+tape+bicycle+tire+patch
I've only used it once, on someone elses tire, because the rubber
cement had dried out in three out of three patch kits available. It
apparently worked as there were no threatening messages on my
answering machine when I returned home. The only real tricks that I
recall are to make sure the tube doesn't have any crud or baby powder
on the surface, and to NOT wrap the tape all the way around the tube
so that the tube can expand when pressurized.

I don't think it would have worked with narrow high pressure tires.
The one I patched was only pressurized to about 50(?) lbs. I don't
think the duct tape patch would have held at 100 lbs.


On one long tour, our Continental Top Touring tires developed
worrying bubbles
in the sidewalls.



Is that a Conti problem? I had similar issue with Gatorskins. Two
failed prematurely when their sidewalls started to give up.


During the year of that tour (2003) I think it was a pretty common
problem with Continental tires. I don't know if it still is.

IIRC, I did later find that I'd been overinflating the tires.


I had mine at the usual 90-95% of rated tire pressure. The CST tires
never blew but their thread was gone after a mere 1000mi and the
sidewalls had lots of fine cracks which was concerning. Next up is
Vittoria Zafiro (got one of them on there right now) and after that Vee
Rubber. I don't think any of them will ever achieve the 2500mi per tire
that Gatorskins delivered but not blowing sidewalls is more important.
Plus they are not such a bear to get onto the rim.

How long do your road tires last? In Europe some people claim well in
excess of 5000mi and even while living there I never had that happen for
me, no matter which brand or price category tire I had on there. I
always lived in hilly regions though and maybe that wears tires.



... This was in remote North Dakota. I reinforced the system by
wrapping the tubes loosely with duct tape. I was trying to
approximate the
diameter of the inflated tubes. I can't say for sure it worked, but
we didn't
suffer any blowouts.


And then you fret about my hose clamp fix :-)

http://www.analogconsultants.com/ng/bike/Hoseclamp.JPG

It still works ...


If you told me you used a hose clamp to keep your headset adjusted for a
week when crossing remote North Dakota, I'd say it was fine.

When you brag about permanently using a hose clamp instead of proper
hardware, I call it a kludge.


No bragging, it just works. Maybe I'll look for a new headset some day.
"One of these days", as Pa Kettle used to say. Though for the $25 that's
likely to cost I can get all the ingredients for a nice 5-gallon batch
of IPA :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #16  
Old April 12th 18, 03:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 255
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 11:36:51 PM UTC+2, Andre Jute wrote:
Gee, there's stubborn, and then there is pathological obsession. Don't you guys have a mobile phone and the number of a responsive taxi service?

AJ
Flabbergasted


Or in that situation the use of your car is 'allowed', as it is for getting groceries.

Lou
  #19  
Old April 12th 18, 05:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,219
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On Thursday, April 12, 2018 at 7:19:15 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-11 19:39, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/11/2018 4:58 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-10 21:08, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 11:26:54 AM UTC-4, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 21:39:29 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday I
discovered my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare tube and
needed to leave within minutes. Pulled off the clincher tire and
tube and put on a spare tubular tire I had hanging around. Worked
perfectly and allowed me to make the appointment on time. Weird
combination = tubular tire on a clincher rim but it worked well
enough to get me to and from the appointment.
Cheers

Ummm... perhaps you should carry some duct tape. There are some
articles and a few videos on how it's done.
https://www.google.com/search?q=duct+tape+bicycle+tire+patch
I've only used it once, on someone elses tire, because the rubber
cement had dried out in three out of three patch kits available. It
apparently worked as there were no threatening messages on my
answering machine when I returned home. The only real tricks that I
recall are to make sure the tube doesn't have any crud or baby powder
on the surface, and to NOT wrap the tape all the way around the tube
so that the tube can expand when pressurized.

I don't think it would have worked with narrow high pressure tires.
The one I patched was only pressurized to about 50(?) lbs. I don't
think the duct tape patch would have held at 100 lbs.


On one long tour, our Continental Top Touring tires developed
worrying bubbles
in the sidewalls.


Is that a Conti problem? I had similar issue with Gatorskins. Two
failed prematurely when their sidewalls started to give up.


During the year of that tour (2003) I think it was a pretty common
problem with Continental tires. I don't know if it still is.

IIRC, I did later find that I'd been overinflating the tires.


I had mine at the usual 90-95% of rated tire pressure. The CST tires
never blew but their thread was gone after a mere 1000mi and the
sidewalls had lots of fine cracks which was concerning. Next up is
Vittoria Zafiro (got one of them on there right now) and after that Vee
Rubber. I don't think any of them will ever achieve the 2500mi per tire
that Gatorskins delivered but not blowing sidewalls is more important.
Plus they are not such a bear to get onto the rim.


Have fun with the Zafiros -- they're flat prone, and they wear quickly. The good part is that they're relatively light, and they have a nice tread pattern like a Pasela, so they get better traction than a pure slick on wet leaves and grass. The bad part is that the compound has less wet grip than a Pasela. Gatorskins are better tires all around, notwithstanding your personal experience with sidewall damage. The only downside to Gatorskins, IMO, is price and the fact that they are almost a pure slick -- but by this time of year, most of the leaves are off the ground, and I can get by with a pure slick.

I had problems getting a Gatorskin onto a CR18 rim -- which is like your old rims and has a shallow rim well, but never a problem on any other rim. I would think your old rims would be toast now with all the miles and hard braking in Gnarlyville. You should spring for some new rims with deeper rim wells that will accommodate modern tires.


-- Jay Beattie.



  #20  
Old April 12th 18, 06:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,299
Default Desperate needs = desperate but workable solution

On 2018-04-12 09:57, jbeattie wrote:
On Thursday, April 12, 2018 at 7:19:15 AM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-11 19:39, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 4/11/2018 4:58 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-04-10 21:08, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 11:26:54 AM UTC-4, Jeff
Liebermann wrote:
On Mon, 9 Apr 2018 21:39:29 -0700 (PDT), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

Just before leaving for an important appointment Monday
I discovered my rear tire was flat. Didn't have a spare
tube and needed to leave within minutes. Pulled off the
clincher tire and tube and put on a spare tubular tire I
had hanging around. Worked perfectly and allowed me to
make the appointment on time. Weird combination = tubular
tire on a clincher rim but it worked well enough to get
me to and from the appointment. Cheers

Ummm... perhaps you should carry some duct tape. There are
some articles and a few videos on how it's done.
https://www.google.com/search?q=duct+tape+bicycle+tire+patch


I've only used it once, on someone elses tire, because the rubber
cement had dried out in three out of three patch kits
available. It apparently worked as there were no
threatening messages on my answering machine when I
returned home. The only real tricks that I recall are to
make sure the tube doesn't have any crud or baby powder on
the surface, and to NOT wrap the tape all the way around
the tube so that the tube can expand when pressurized.

I don't think it would have worked with narrow high
pressure tires. The one I patched was only pressurized to
about 50(?) lbs. I don't think the duct tape patch would
have held at 100 lbs.


On one long tour, our Continental Top Touring tires
developed worrying bubbles in the sidewalls.


Is that a Conti problem? I had similar issue with Gatorskins.
Two failed prematurely when their sidewalls started to give
up.

During the year of that tour (2003) I think it was a pretty
common problem with Continental tires. I don't know if it still
is.

IIRC, I did later find that I'd been overinflating the tires.


I had mine at the usual 90-95% of rated tire pressure. The CST
tires never blew but their thread was gone after a mere 1000mi and
the sidewalls had lots of fine cracks which was concerning. Next up
is Vittoria Zafiro (got one of them on there right now) and after
that Vee Rubber. I don't think any of them will ever achieve the
2500mi per tire that Gatorskins delivered but not blowing sidewalls
is more important. Plus they are not such a bear to get onto the
rim.


Have fun with the Zafiros -- they're flat prone, and they wear
quickly. The good part is that they're relatively light, and they
have a nice tread pattern like a Pasela, so they get better traction
than a pure slick on wet leaves and grass. The bad part is that the
compound has less wet grip than a Pasela. Gatorskins are better
tires all around, notwithstanding your personal experience with
sidewall damage. The only downside to Gatorskins, IMO, is price and
the fact that they are almost a pure slick -- but by this time of
year, most of the leaves are off the ground, and I can get by with a
pure slick.


I am not holding with breath regarding the Zafiro tires, it's just a
test. My real hope is with the Vee Rubber tires that should arrive soon.
Hoping they have the same rubber as their TrailTaker style MTB tires.
Those last up to 800mi which is really good for the terrain out here.


I had problems getting a Gatorskin onto a CR18 rim -- which is like
your old rims and has a shallow rim well, but never a problem on any
other rim. I would think your old rims would be toast now with all
the miles and hard braking in Gnarlyville. You should spring for some
new rims with deeper rim wells that will accommodate modern tires.


The rims are still hanging on. I mostly let'er rip on downhill stretches
as long as the speed won't go above 45mph. Down in the valley I am on
bike paths most of the time where there is little need for braking. On
Monday I rode this bike path down to the Cosumnes River:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-3gnLIUum0

When the rims are up I'll be looking for a whole new wheel set and that
would also mean bending up the rear from 126mm to 130mm which seems to
be the standard these days.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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