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Dynamo/LED power conditioning



 
 
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  #21  
Old May 4th 18, 07:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
bob prohaska
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Posts: 47
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/4/2018 12:06 AM, bob prohaska wrote:

I'm curious, what make of dynamo got hot at 10 mph?

The glued-on label has faded out completely. Plain, drawn aluminum
case, steel mouting bracket. It's more slender than the Anlun in the
SJS link below and has a metal roller, with a single push-clip terminal.
I can post a photo if it's of interest.

I have ancient Union bottles on two bikes. I don't recall them ever
getting beyond very slightly warm - I'd guess maybe 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

This place has bottle dynamos:
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/dynamos-bottle/
I've bought other stuff from them. Price and shipping speed seem very
competitive with American sources, and selection tends to be much better.

Now that I have the hub dynamo there's little incentive to go back, but
that is a link I didn't know about.


This place has been a good source for bulbs of all kinds:
http://www.reflectalite.com/
They also have LEDs that are drop-in replacements for halogen dyno
bulbs. I bought one for a friend and have another in a headlamp that
I've only bench tested in my basement. It seems very good, but I haven't
tried it on the road. It's not yet needed on any of my bikes.

That is a most interesting site, I can think of a couple reasons to
explore it further. Still, it's uncertain how well optics designed
for filaments will match to LEDs' larger source size. Also, it looks
as if the drop-in dynamo bulb replacements are only 1 W, leaving 2 W
or so excess get rid of. Odd they don't offer a 2.4 or 3 W version.


Thank you!

bob prohaska

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  #22  
Old May 5th 18, 04:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,271
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On 5/4/2018 2:04 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/4/2018 12:06 AM, bob prohaska wrote:

I'm curious, what make of dynamo got hot at 10 mph?

The glued-on label has faded out completely. Plain, drawn aluminum
case, steel mouting bracket. It's more slender than the Anlun in the
SJS link below and has a metal roller, with a single push-clip terminal.
I can post a photo if it's of interest.

I have ancient Union bottles on two bikes. I don't recall them ever
getting beyond very slightly warm - I'd guess maybe 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

This place has bottle dynamos:
https://www.sjscycles.co.uk/dynamos-bottle/
I've bought other stuff from them. Price and shipping speed seem very
competitive with American sources, and selection tends to be much better.

Now that I have the hub dynamo there's little incentive to go back, but
that is a link I didn't know about.


This place has been a good source for bulbs of all kinds:
http://www.reflectalite.com/
They also have LEDs that are drop-in replacements for halogen dyno
bulbs. I bought one for a friend and have another in a headlamp that
I've only bench tested in my basement. It seems very good, but I haven't
tried it on the road. It's not yet needed on any of my bikes.

That is a most interesting site, I can think of a couple reasons to
explore it further. Still, it's uncertain how well optics designed
for filaments will match to LEDs' larger source size. Also, it looks
as if the drop-in dynamo bulb replacements are only 1 W, leaving 2 W
or so excess get rid of. Odd they don't offer a 2.4 or 3 W version.


I kept the packaging on the one I bought, and just checked the notes I
wrote in it. Yes, it's labeled 1 Watt, but it gave much more light than
the halogen 2.4 Watt bulb. I wrote that the focus was not as precise,
with much more spread, but ISTR thinking it was pretty good. I never
mounted it on a bike, but I tested it by shining it down my driveway.

I figure it's of most use to people wanting to keep old bikes
period-correct, more or less.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #23  
Old May 6th 18, 06:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,507
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On 2018-05-03 19:36, bob prohaska wrote:
Sepp Ruf wrote:
David Scheidt wrote:
sms wrote:
:On 5/2/2018 7:49 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
: I finally caved and bought a Shimano dh-3n72 hub for use on my
: exercise bike. It works fine, but the LEDs flicker quite noticeably
: at all speeds. The circuit puts series trios of LEDs in inverse
: parallel across the dynamo, so each trio lights on alternate half-
: cycles. The flicker wasn't visible with the old Soubitez roller,
: because it was working at about 6x higher frequency. The circuit is at
: http://www.zefox.net/~bob/bicycle/schematic.gif
: The point of the design is to eliminate rectifier losses, which are
: substantial at low voltage.
:
: The new setup might be ok for fast riding. At low speeds and in traffic
: I'm less sure I'll like it and fairly certain bystanders won't like it
: at all, especially at night. As a DRL it certainly aids conspicuity 8-)
:
: Can anybody point me to a discussion of what outfits like B&M use in
: their dynamo-powerd LED headlights? I've searched intermittenly but
: never hit the right keywords.


The classic B&M circuits used rectification and current-doubling to fully
power one 1 amp led. Your 2x3S LED approach is quite different.

http://candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?430445
Good luck!


Note the three big 470uF capacitor in the schematic. That's the "flicker
reduction trick" :-)

Problem is, electrolytic capacitors do not live long in harsh climate
conditions such as the black light enclosure baking in the glistening
Arizona desert sun for hours every week or riding around the Klondike in
a harsh winter.

For me the only proper way of lighting a bicycle is with a rechargeable
battery. The LEDs get clean DC and the battery can be recharged from any
source, even a pulsating one. That way the lights will not dim to "stand
light" or go out when waiting at a traffic light. Why should bicycle
lighting be inferior to car lighting?

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #24  
Old May 6th 18, 06:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 1,349
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 12:01:24 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:

For me the only proper way of lighting a bicycle is with a rechargeable
battery. The LEDs get clean DC and the battery can be recharged from any
source, even a pulsating one. That way the lights will not dim to "stand
light" or go out when waiting at a traffic light. Why should bicycle
lighting be inferior to car lighting?

--
Regards, Joerg


What F-ing world do you live in where you recharge the lights on your car? It must be a pretty F-ed up world. On all the cars I have driven, you turn the switch and the lights come on. There ain't no recharging the car lights. Rechargeable lights and batteries. Why not just duct tape a flashlight to your bars. Then you can stop at any convenience store and buy some new D batteries and ride forever.
  #25  
Old May 6th 18, 07:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
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Posts: 2,875
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On Sun, 6 May 2018 10:50:45 -0700 (PDT), "
wrote:

Why not just duct tape a flashlight to your bars. Then you can stop
at any convenience store and buy some new D batteries and ride forever.


Bungee cord works better than (duct) tape:
http://www.learnbydestroying.com/jeffl/pics/bicycles/slides/bicycle-flashlight.html
Patent pending.

D cells are not the best choice. Modifying a D cell Maglite
flashlight to handle LiIon cells works better:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1TgxJkcEDsB5KaoWo_u13b-3Ke-Lmlp5DVOxE38d8L5E/edit#gid=0
2nd best are D-cell adapters for AA NiMH cells:
https://www.google.com/search?q=aa+to+d+adapter&tbm=isch

--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #26  
Old May 6th 18, 08:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 9,723
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On 5/6/2018 12:50 PM, wrote:
On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 12:01:24 PM UTC-5, Joerg wrote:

For me the only proper way of lighting a bicycle is with a rechargeable
battery. The LEDs get clean DC and the battery can be recharged from any
source, even a pulsating one. That way the lights will not dim to "stand
light" or go out when waiting at a traffic light. Why should bicycle
lighting be inferior to car lighting?

--
Regards, Joerg


What F-ing world do you live in where you recharge the lights on your car? It must be a pretty F-ed up world. On all the cars I have driven, you turn the switch and the lights come on. There ain't no recharging the car lights. Rechargeable lights and batteries. Why not just duct tape a flashlight to your bars. Then you can stop at any convenience store and buy some new D batteries and ride forever.


I think Joerg meant that the automobile current from a
12~14VAC alternator source gets run through a diode bride
and then (as switched by the regulator) through a lead-acid
pile.

It's a lot of hardware for a bicycle I agree, but Joerg's
seems to work for Joerg's values of performance and
efficiency. Frank & I prefer a simple 6VAC tire drive dynamo
and others extoll USB-LiIon sets or hub dynamos. World's a
big place and people have their own criteria, which are
often inscrutable.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #27  
Old May 6th 18, 11:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
James[_8_]
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Posts: 5,758
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On 07/05/18 03:01, Joerg wrote:


Note the three big 470uF capacitor in the schematic. That's the "flicker
reduction trick" :-)

Problem is, electrolytic capacitors do not live long in harsh climate
conditions such as the black light enclosure baking in the glistening
Arizona desert sun for hours every week or riding around the Klondike in
a harsh winter.

For me the only proper way of lighting a bicycle is with a rechargeable
battery.


Bull**** alert!

We all know how reliable rechargeable batteries are, especially in harsh
environments, right?

OTOH, here is an electrolytic cap from Vishay, that has a "useful life"
of 1,000,000 hours at 40C, and 8000 hours at 125C.

https://www.vishay.com/docs/28334/118aht.pdf

(The useful life approximately halves for every 10C increase.)

If the temperature inside the electronics enclosure was much more than
80C for most of the time the light is in operation (E.g. while you're
riding and the light has forced air cooling), the engineer ought to be
shot, and that still gives a useful life of over 62500 hours.

--
JS


  #28  
Old May 7th 18, 02:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 6,271
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On 5/6/2018 3:19 PM, AMuzi wrote:

I think Joerg meant that the automobile current from a 12~14VAC
alternator source gets run through a diode bride and then (as switched
by the regulator) through a lead-acid pile.

It's a lot of hardware for a bicycle I agree, but Joerg's seems to work
for Joerg's values of performance and efficiency. Frank & I prefer a
simple 6VAC tire drive dynamo...


For the record, I also have a couple hub dynamos. And two of my formerly
"tire drive" dynos are now rim drive.

But yes, I certainly prefer those to fussing with recharging or
replacing or remembering batteries.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #29  
Old May 7th 18, 02:55 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On 5/6/2018 6:15 PM, James wrote:
On 07/05/18 03:01, Joerg wrote:


Note the three big 470uF capacitor in the schematic. That's the
"flicker reduction trick" :-)

Problem is, electrolytic capacitors do not live long in harsh climate
conditions such as the black light enclosure baking in the glistening
Arizona desert sun for hours every week or riding around the Klondike
in a harsh winter.

For me the only proper way of lighting a bicycle is with a
rechargeable battery.


Bull**** alert!

We all know how reliable rechargeable batteries are, especially in harsh
environments, right?

OTOH, here is an electrolytic cap from Vishay, that has a "useful life"
of 1,000,000 hours at 40C, and 8000 hours at 125C.

https://www.vishay.com/docs/28334/118aht.pdf

(The useful life approximately halves for every 10C increase.)

If the temperature inside the electronics enclosure was much more than
80C for most of the time the light is in operation (E.g. while you're
riding and the light has forced air cooling), the engineer ought to be
shot, and that still gives a useful life of over 62500 hours.


The bull**** alert was a bit redundant. It was Joerg, after all!

But it's nice to get the technical details. Especially on a tech
discussion group.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #30  
Old May 7th 18, 03:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
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Posts: 3,366
Default Dynamo/LED power conditioning

On Sunday, May 6, 2018 at 6:56:01 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 5/6/2018 6:15 PM, James wrote:
On 07/05/18 03:01, Joerg wrote:


Note the three big 470uF capacitor in the schematic. That's the
"flicker reduction trick" :-)

Problem is, electrolytic capacitors do not live long in harsh climate
conditions such as the black light enclosure baking in the glistening
Arizona desert sun for hours every week or riding around the Klondike
in a harsh winter.

For me the only proper way of lighting a bicycle is with a
rechargeable battery.


Bull**** alert!

We all know how reliable rechargeable batteries are, especially in harsh
environments, right?

OTOH, here is an electrolytic cap from Vishay, that has a "useful life"
of 1,000,000 hours at 40C, and 8000 hours at 125C.

https://www.vishay.com/docs/28334/118aht.pdf

(The useful life approximately halves for every 10C increase.)

If the temperature inside the electronics enclosure was much more than
80C for most of the time the light is in operation (E.g. while you're
riding and the light has forced air cooling), the engineer ought to be
shot, and that still gives a useful life of over 62500 hours.


The bull**** alert was a bit redundant. It was Joerg, after all!

But it's nice to get the technical details. Especially on a tech
discussion group.


Not that I'm a huge fan of dyno light for all purposes, but I've seen a couple of annoyingly bright dyno DRLs on the paths recently. They were fork crown mounted, so I'm pretty sure they weren't battery powered -- and were either pointed up or didn't have cut-off. For someone looking for an all-day DRL, I think that would be the way to go.

-- Jay Beattie.
 




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