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Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 17th 18, 11:35 AM posted to uk.rec.cycling
colwyn[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 238
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in the
Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be almost
seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by researchers.
About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone else”, suggesting
that they were linked to potholes in the road or other obstacles such as
bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four times
as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where cycle lanes
are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of people
injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more likely to be
hurt than official police accident figures show. It revealed that people
with disabilities and those from poorer homes, who are less likely to be
able to afford their own car or public transport, were more likely to be
injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an annual
poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared this with
road accident figures based on police reports, which recorded 18,477
cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including 14,978 slight injuries
and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of cycling
injuries was much higher, although most of these additional injuries
were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that the true scale
of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the use
of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on busy
roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for “car
dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing open doors
and hit passing cyclists.
Ads
  #2  
Old May 17th 18, 12:50 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
jnugent
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,223
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in the
Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be almost
seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by researchers.
About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone else”, suggesting
that they were linked to potholes in the road or other obstacles such as
bollards...


....or sheer carelesness and lack of observation (especially when the
item collided with is a wall, or an piece of street furniture).

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four times
as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where cycle lanes
are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of people
injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more likely to be
hurt than official police accident figures show. It revealed that people
with disabilities and those from poorer homes, who are less likely to be
able to afford their own car or public transport, were more likely to be
injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an annual
poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared this with
road accident figures based on police reports, which recorded 18,477
cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including 14,978 slight injuries
and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of cycling
injuries was much higher, although most of these additional injuries
were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that the true scale
of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the use
of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on busy
roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for “car
dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing open doors
and hit passing cyclists.


On reflection, it's fairly obvious that many injuries occasioned during
a journey (everything from banging an ankle against a pedal or catching
a finger in a slamming car-door upwards) are not reported and that this
is certainly not confined to cycling. Indeed, many minor injuries caused
to pedestrians by cyclists on footways are probably never brought to
official attention.

  #3  
Old May 17th 18, 01:08 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
MrCheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,302
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in the
Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be almost
seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by researchers.
About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone else”, suggesting
that they were linked to potholes in the road or other obstacles such as
bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four times
as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where cycle lanes
are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of people
injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more likely to be
hurt than official police accident figures show. It revealed that people
with disabilities and those from poorer homes, who are less likely to be
able to afford their own car or public transport, were more likely to be
injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an annual
poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared this with
road accident figures based on police reports, which recorded 18,477
cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including 14,978 slight injuries
and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of cycling
injuries was much higher, although most of these additional injuries
were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that the true scale
of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the use
of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on busy
roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for “car
dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing open doors
and hit passing cyclists.


Cyclists do not use segregated cycle lanes in the UK

There are no figures to show how she has arrived at her conclusions.

Cycling in the UK overall is actually declining.
  #4  
Old May 17th 18, 02:08 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
colwyn[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 238
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 13:08, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in the
Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be almost
seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by
researchers. About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone else”,
suggesting that they were linked to potholes in the road or other
obstacles such as bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four times
as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where cycle lanes
are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of people
injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more likely to be
hurt than official police accident figures show. It revealed that
people with disabilities and those from poorer homes, who are less
likely to be able to afford their own car or public transport, were
more likely to be injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an annual
poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared this with
road accident figures based on police reports, which recorded 18,477
cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including 14,978 slight injuries
and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of cycling
injuries was much higher, although most of these additional injuries
were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that the true
scale of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the
use of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on
busy roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for
“car dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing open
doors and hit passing cyclists.


Cyclists do not use segregated cycle lanes in the UK

There are no figures to show how she has arrived at her conclusions.


Eh? This is a newspaper article analysing responses form 147,000 people!
18,477 cycling casualties in 2016 etc - I suggest you read the article
or why not contact Dr Aldred?

Cycling in the UK overall is actually declining.


And again, read the article. Here it is again:
"Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s."

If it is, then it is high time government does something something about it!


  #5  
Old May 17th 18, 02:33 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
colwyn[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 238
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 14:08, colwyn wrote:
On 17/05/2018 13:08, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in
the Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be almost
seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by
researchers. About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone
else”, suggesting that they were linked to potholes in the road or
other obstacles such as bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four
times as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where cycle
lanes are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of
people injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more
likely to be hurt than official police accident figures show. It
revealed that people with disabilities and those from poorer homes,
who are less likely to be able to afford their own car or public
transport, were more likely to be injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an
annual poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared
this with road accident figures based on police reports, which
recorded 18,477 cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including 14,978
slight injuries and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of
cycling injuries was much higher, although most of these additional
injuries were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that
the true scale of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the
use of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on
busy roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for
“car dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing
open doors and hit passing cyclists.


Cyclists do not use segregated cycle lanes in the UK

There are no figures to show how she has arrived at her conclusions.


Eh? This is a newspaper article analysing responses form 147,000 people!
18,477 cycling casualties in 2016 etc - I suggest you read the article
or why not contact Dr Aldred?

Cycling in the UK overall is actually declining.


And again, read the article. Here it is again:
"Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s."

If it is, then it is high time government does something something about
it!


Also in the press-
Maybe this will help:

Brussels slaps Britain with LAWSUIT: Germany and France also targeted
over pollution
BRITAIN is being sued by the European Commission over its failure to
meet air quality targets in dozens of towns and cities across the country.
  #6  
Old May 17th 18, 04:11 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
MrCheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,302
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 14:08, colwyn wrote:
On 17/05/2018 13:08, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in
the Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be almost
seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by
researchers. About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone
else”, suggesting that they were linked to potholes in the road or
other obstacles such as bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four
times as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where cycle
lanes are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of
people injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more
likely to be hurt than official police accident figures show. It
revealed that people with disabilities and those from poorer homes,
who are less likely to be able to afford their own car or public
transport, were more likely to be injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an
annual poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared
this with road accident figures based on police reports, which
recorded 18,477 cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including 14,978
slight injuries and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of
cycling injuries was much higher, although most of these additional
injuries were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that
the true scale of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the
use of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on
busy roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for
“car dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing
open doors and hit passing cyclists.


Cyclists do not use segregated cycle lanes in the UK

There are no figures to show how she has arrived at her conclusions.


Eh? This is a newspaper article analysing responses form 147,000 people!
18,477 cycling casualties in 2016 etc - I suggest you read the article
or why not contact Dr Aldred?

Cycling in the UK overall is actually declining.


And again, read the article. Here it is again:
"Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s."

If it is, then it is high time government does something something about
it!



So you agree, cycling is declining.

There is no link for me to follow, in order to read and analyse the
figures she gives.
  #7  
Old May 17th 18, 04:11 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
MrCheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,302
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 14:33, colwyn wrote:
On 17/05/2018 14:08, colwyn wrote:
On 17/05/2018 13:08, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in
the Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be
almost seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by
researchers. About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone
else”, suggesting that they were linked to potholes in the road or
other obstacles such as bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four
times as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where
cycle lanes are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of
people injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more
likely to be hurt than official police accident figures show. It
revealed that people with disabilities and those from poorer homes,
who are less likely to be able to afford their own car or public
transport, were more likely to be injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an
annual poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared
this with road accident figures based on police reports, which
recorded 18,477 cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including
14,978 slight injuries and 3,499 people who were killed or seriously
injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of
cycling injuries was much higher, although most of these additional
injuries were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that
the true scale of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of
the year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over
the past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made
15 journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier.
The number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase the
use of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory passing
distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to cyclists on
busy roads. It could also investigate the possibility of fines for
“car dooring”, when motorists or car passengers negligently swing
open doors and hit passing cyclists.

Cyclists do not use segregated cycle lanes in the UK

There are no figures to show how she has arrived at her conclusions.


Eh? This is a newspaper article analysing responses form 147,000 people!
18,477 cycling casualties in 2016 etc - I suggest you read the article
or why not contact Dr Aldred?

Cycling in the UK overall is actually declining.


And again, read the article. Here it is again:
"Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s."

If it is, then it is high time government does something something
about it!


Also in the press-
Maybe this will help:

Brussels slaps Britain with LAWSUIT: Germany and France also targeted
over pollution
BRITAIN is being sued by the European Commission over its failure to
meet air quality targets in dozens of towns and cities across the country.


What does that have to do with the price of fish?
  #8  
Old May 17th 18, 04:16 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
MrCheerful
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,302
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in the
Netherlands


Netherlands 17 million people total 200 cyclists a year dead

UK 65 million people about a hundred cyclists a year dead

How does that mean UK cyclists are 4 times as likely to get killed?
  #9  
Old May 17th 18, 04:47 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
colwyn[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 238
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 16:16, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in the
Netherlands


Netherlands 17 million people total* 200 cyclists a year dead

UK 65 million people about a hundred cyclists a year dead

How does that mean UK cyclists are 4 times as likely to get killed?


Try this calculation;
The average cycling distance per person cycled in the UK is 52 miles per
annum, whilst a person in the Netherlands cycles 1000 km a year.
  #10  
Old May 17th 18, 04:50 PM posted to uk.rec.cycling
colwyn[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 238
Default Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show

On 17/05/2018 16:11, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 14:33, colwyn wrote:
On 17/05/2018 14:08, colwyn wrote:
On 17/05/2018 13:08, MrCheerful wrote:
On 17/05/2018 11:35, colwyn wrote:
Cyclists hurt seven times more often than figures show
Graeme Paton, Transport Correspondent
May 17 2018, 12:01am,
The Times


British cyclists are four times as likely to be killed as those in
the Netherlands

The number of cyclists being injured on British roads could be
almost seven times higher than previously thought.

Huge under-reporting of cycling injuries, often involving minor
collisions with cars and other vehicles, has been found by
researchers. About a third of incidents did “not involve anyone
else”, suggesting that they were linked to potholes in the road or
other obstacles such as bollards.

The report by Rachel Aldred, a reader in transport at Westminster
University, will fuel demands for an increase in the number of
segregated cycle lanes. She said that British cyclists were four
times as likely to be killed as those in the Netherlands, where
cycle lanes are far more common.

The study also unearthed great under-reporting in the number of
people injured while walking, with pedestrians three times more
likely to be hurt than official police accident figures show. It
revealed that people with disabilities and those from poorer homes,
who are less likely to be able to afford their own car or public
transport, were more likely to be injured than the national average.

Dr Aldred analysed feedback from the National Travel Survey, an
annual poll of the transport habits of 147,000 people. She compared
this with road accident figures based on police reports, which
recorded 18,477 cycling casualties on roads in 2016, including
14,978 slight injuries and 3,499 people who were killed or
seriously injured.

Analysis of the National Travel Survey showed that the risk of
cycling injuries was much higher, although most of these additional
injuries were likely to be slight, Dr Aldred said, suggesting that
the true scale of injuries could exceed 125,000.

Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of
the year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined
over the past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average
adult made 15 journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years
earlier. The number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since
the mid-1990s.

The government has launched a review of cycle safety to increase
the use of bicycles. It is likely to consider imposing mandatory
passing distances to prevent motorists overtaking too close to
cyclists on busy roads. It could also investigate the possibility
of fines for “car dooring”, when motorists or car passengers
negligently swing open doors and hit passing cyclists.

Cyclists do not use segregated cycle lanes in the UK

There are no figures to show how she has arrived at her conclusions.

Eh? This is a newspaper article analysing responses form 147,000 people!
18,477 cycling casualties in 2016 etc - I suggest you read the
article or why not contact Dr Aldred?

Cycling in the UK overall is actually declining.

And again, read the article. Here it is again:
"Figures published by the Department for Transport at the start of the
year showed that the number of people cycling has flatlined over the
past decade as traffic has risen steeply. The average adult made 15
journeys by bicycle in 2016, two fewer than ten years earlier. The
number has fluctuated between 14 and 18 trips since the mid-1990s."

If it is, then it is high time government does something something
about it!


Also in the press-
Maybe this will help:

Brussels slaps Britain with LAWSUIT: Germany and France also targeted
over pollution
BRITAIN is being sued by the European Commission over its failure to
meet air quality targets in dozens of towns and cities across the
country.


What does that have to do with the price of fish?

Pollution is damaging and kills - diesel and petrol fumes are not
healthy for cycling.
 




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