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casette shifting



 
 
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  #11  
Old November 6th 18, 03:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Default casette shifting

On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 8:33:43 PM UTC-5, wrote:
BTW should the cassette be completely dry optimally even tho it won't happen? No oil, chain only on the inside?


It doesn't hurt to keep a LIGHT coating of anti-rust (oil) on the cassette. For the chain the lubricant/oil needs to be between the roller and the pin or wherever the links move/pivot. Again a light coating of an anti-rust (oil) is good for the outside links of the chain too. What you DON'T want is so much oil that it attracts dust and turns it into the slurry that's a most excellent grinding compound. IMHO, more chains and parts have been ruined by over lubricating them than have been by letting them go dry.

Cheers
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  #12  
Old November 6th 18, 03:51 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default casette shifting

If I'm allowed to guess, the outside of the chain grabs the teeth and pulls the sprocket. You don't oil the jaws of a spanner before you pull a nut. OTOH the chain enters and leaves the sprocket, *and* moves between them. Cannot oil help with that?
  #13  
Old November 6th 18, 03:52 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default casette shifting

Ok, but coating only to prevent rust?
  #14  
Old November 6th 18, 05:17 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Default casette shifting

On Monday, November 5, 2018 at 9:52:55 PM UTC-5, wrote:
Ok, but coating only to prevent rust?


Don't know to what you're replying since you snipped it.

If you want to wear out a chain or cassette REALLY FAST put lots of lubricant on it so that it picks up lots of grit that becomes an ideal grinding compound and will quickly grind the chain and cassette and perhaps even the chainrings to uselessness.

Other than to prevent rust you ONLY need the lubricant to be between the rollers and the pins of the chain. Anywhere else risks picking up the aforementioned grit and beginning the grinding process.

Btw, that's why some people prefer to use a dry lube.

Cheers
  #15  
Old November 6th 18, 06:26 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
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Default casette shifting

On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 17:24:53 -0800, moasenwood wrote:

How do you lube the deraileur?


When I do routine maintenance sessions, I generally pack grease into
where ever by disassembling it, grease and rebuild.

  #16  
Old November 6th 18, 07:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default casette shifting

On Mon, 05 Nov 2018 18:51:11 -0800, moasenwood wrote:

If I'm allowed to guess, the outside of the chain grabs the teeth and
pulls the sprocket. You don't oil the jaws of a spanner before you pull
a nut. OTOH the chain enters and leaves the sprocket, *and* moves
between them. Cannot oil help with that?


If you want to collect dust and junk as you ride along. A little bit of
oil is good as that. Best just to oil the chain and leave the outside of
the sprockets clean.

OTOH,i'm sure some one can sell you some majic oil just for that.

  #17  
Old November 6th 18, 08:25 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default casette shifting

On Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 11:26:15 PM UTC+1, Emanuel Berg wrote:
After riding this bike a couple of weeks with
no problem, shifting out, to smaller sprockets
on the casette have started to trouble,
sometimes nothing happens when I click.
If I understand the theory correctly, this is
because the cable is too tight, and you should
turn the barrel in (clockwise) to make it more
slack. This actually worked, but how can it
happen that the cable is too tight suddenly?
Shouldn't it be more loose rather?

--
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Your inner cable gets stuck somewhere. Easy to investigate problem. Just look. Remove the cable from the RD and shift while tension the cable by hand. Ignore lube suggestions.

Lou
  #18  
Old November 6th 18, 08:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
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Default casette shifting

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 2:25:16 AM UTC-5, wrote:
On Saturday, November 3, 2018 at 11:26:15 PM UTC+1, Emanuel Berg wrote:
After riding this bike a couple of weeks with
no problem, shifting out, to smaller sprockets
on the casette have started to trouble,
sometimes nothing happens when I click.
If I understand the theory correctly, this is
because the cable is too tight, and you should
turn the barrel in (clockwise) to make it more
slack. This actually worked, but how can it
happen that the cable is too tight suddenly?
Shouldn't it be more loose rather?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


Your inner cable gets stuck somewhere. Easy to investigate problem. Just look. Remove the cable from the RD and shift while tension the cable by hand. Ignore lube suggestions.

Lou


But he said that turning the adjuster barrel in (clockwise) cure his problem. Thus he does not have a sticking cable. He wants to know why the cable suddenly got tighter than it was before.

I think that perhaps the housing somewhere popped out of a ferrule and is sitting on top of it rather than in it.

Cheers
  #19  
Old November 6th 18, 08:12 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
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Posts: 19
Default casette shifting

OK, so if IIUC, oil (a light coating) on the
cassette/chainrings and on the outside of the
chain does not facilitate shifting nor the
entry/exit of the links onto/out of the
sprockets/chainrings?

The only reason to do it is to prevent rust!

This leads me to three other questions:

1) If you use the bike every day, is rust
really a problem for either chain or
sprockets/chainrings?

2) What material are they made of?

3) When you buy a brand new chain, it is
factory impregnated on the outside as well.
Is this again only to prevent rust, and does
not help shifting or reduce wear in any way?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #20  
Old November 6th 18, 08:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
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Posts: 19
Default casette shifting

lou.holtman wrote:

Your inner cable gets stuck somewhere.
Easy to investigate problem. Just look.
Remove the cable from the RD and shift while
tension the cable by hand.
Ignore lube suggestions.


Too late

I degreased the whole drivetrain, lubed the
chain, removed the excess oil, and oiled the
RD. Now shifting works to all sprockets, only
I noticed shifting to smaller sprockets is
a tiny bit slower than shifting to bigger.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
 




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