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relation between saddle height and horizontal position



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 6th 18, 08:19 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
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Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

If you radically increase the height of the
saddle, does it typically make sense to move
the saddle a bit forward as well? This is my
intuition but I have been wrong before.

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  #2  
Old November 6th 18, 09:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
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Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

On 06/11/2018 2:19 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
If you radically increase the height of the
saddle, does it typically make sense to move
the saddle a bit forward as well? This is my
intuition but I have been wrong before.


Ignoring the question of the bike's geometry, I'm not sure why you would
radically increase the saddle height so I'll assume that you're fitting
a bike for the first time so you'd want to fit the saddle position.

The saddle fore/aft has to do with your position over the pedals. You
would need to adjust that.

https://www.ilovebicycling.com/fore-...ddle-position/

  #3  
Old November 6th 18, 09:08 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 1:19:05 PM UTC-6, Emanuel Berg wrote:
If you radically increase the height of the
saddle, does it typically make sense to move
the saddle a bit forward as well? This is my
intuition but I have been wrong before.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


"Radically increase the height of the saddle"??? I suppose in reality, if you "radically" increase the height of the saddle, then you would need to worry a tiny bit about the offset of the saddle or position on the rails. But who radically adjusts the height of their saddle? Unless you are a teenage boy who stops riding for a few years, your height never ever changes enough to radically adjust your saddle height.

When I get a new bike to set the saddle height and offset, I shove the saddle all the way back on the rails. And set the saddle height to within +/- 0.5 inches of the correct height. I know my saddle height well enough and can look at saddles easy enough to tell about what is right. Not much guessing involved. And once the saddle is all the way back and about the right height, I go for a test ride around the block. And adjust the height a few millimeters. Another test ride and another adjustment. Maybe do that a few times. Then I never touch the saddle again. When you adjust the height a few millimeters, it makes no difference to the saddle offset.

I think you are making up things to worry about.
  #5  
Old November 6th 18, 09:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
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Posts: 22
Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

Duane wrote:

https://www.ilovebicycling.com/fore-...ddle-position/


This seems straightforward:

The Knee Over Pedal Spindle Method

The generally accepted way to find the
proper saddle position is called knee over
pedal spindle (KOPS). To find KOPS sit on
the bike with the pedals at the 3 o’clock
and 9 o’clock position.*Hold a plumb bob at
the front of your forward kneecap and see
where it hits in relation to the pedal
spindle. The line should intersect the
pedal spindle/axel. If it falls in front,
adjust the saddle rearward. If it falls
behind, adjust the saddle forward.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #6  
Old November 6th 18, 11:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 2:30:00 PM UTC-6, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Duane wrote:

https://www.ilovebicycling.com/fore-...ddle-position/


This seems straightforward:


BUT IT IS NOT!!!!!!! The statement below says for the KOPS, you hold the plumb line at the front of the kneecap. BUT I have heard where you hold the plumb line at that little notch behind the kneecap. That will affect where the plumb line intersects the pedal spindle. Ain't nothing straight forward!

But you can sleep soundly knowing that where your knee is over the pedal spindle, little or lot forward or little or lot behind, it does not matter. The human body adapts equally fine wherever it falls. Look at pro triathalon and some pro tour riders now, they have their saddles shoved all the way forward on straight seatposts. And they do fine. And me and many others have their saddles shoved all the way back on setback seatposts. Like all pros did back when Eddy Merckx rode. Your saddle setback or forward position isn't too important.



The Knee Over Pedal Spindle Method

The generally accepted way to find the
proper saddle position is called knee over
pedal spindle (KOPS). To find KOPS sit on
the bike with the pedals at the 3 o’clock
and 9 o’clock position.*Hold a plumb bob at
the front of your forward kneecap and see
where it hits in relation to the pedal
spindle. The line should intersect the
pedal spindle/axel. If it falls in front,
adjust the saddle rearward. If it falls
behind, adjust the saddle forward.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


  #7  
Old November 7th 18, 12:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 317
Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

On Tue, 06 Nov 2018 20:19:03 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

If you radically increase the height of the
saddle, does it typically make sense to move
the saddle a bit forward as well? This is my
intuition but I have been wrong before.


The usual "rule of thumb" is that the fore and aft position of the
saddle is set so that with the knee bent 90 degrees the ball of the
foot (just behind the large toe) is over the center line of the pedal
when the pedal is at its most forward position..

Be aware that this is largely just a good starting point and depending
on how you ride the position can be changed to suit your riding style.

The "rule of thumb" for saddle height is that sitting on the seat with
the hips level and the crank turned so that the pedal is at the lowest
point the heel should just rest on the pedal with the leg straight.
And again this is a starting point and the final height should be set
to fit the riding style.
cheers,

John B.



  #8  
Old November 18th 18, 08:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 472
Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018 at 11:19:05 AM UTC-8, Emanuel Berg wrote:
If you radically increase the height of the
saddle, does it typically make sense to move
the saddle a bit forward as well? This is my
intuition but I have been wrong before.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573


Rather than increasing saddle height radically perhaps you should get a proper bike fitting. There are several services. Most people work their way into the proper position over time but a proper fitting would put you in the proper position immediately.
  #9  
Old November 18th 18, 11:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 1,368
Default relation between saddle height and horizontal position

On Sunday, November 18, 2018 at 1:20:16 PM UTC-6, wrote:

Rather than increasing saddle height radically perhaps you should get a proper bike fitting. There are several services. Most people work their way into the proper position over time but a proper fitting would put you in the proper position immediately.



No it wouldn't. A bike fitting might get you maybe possibly close to where you need to be. If you're lucky. But a bike fitting is just a guess. Only way to get properly fitted is to ride a bike for a long time and make adjustments as you go.
 




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