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cleaning the bike



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 14th 18, 11:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_3_]
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Posts: 31
Default cleaning the bike

The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
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  #2  
Old November 15th 18, 12:00 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
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Posts: 370
Default cleaning the bike

On Wed, 14 Nov 2018 23:43:17 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?


Well, the seals on bicycle wheels and the old traditional square
tapered shaft bottom brackets are not 100% sealed so I'd be a bit
apprehensive to wash the bike with a strong water spray. Say a power
washer, and if I washed a chain with soap and water I believe the step
#2 would be to re-lubricate the chain.


cheers,

John B.



  #3  
Old November 15th 18, 12:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,607
Default cleaning the bike

On 2018-11-14 14:43, Emanuel Berg wrote:
The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?


Clean the bike? Why? It ain't Christmas yet.

The last time my bikes have seen water and a sponge was, ahm, well, I
can't even remember. I found that after dried mud reaches a certain
thickness it falls off by itself or washes off during the next rainy
ride. So in essence the bikes clean themselves. Similar with my car.
Only my wife washes hers regularly. I guess women are different.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #4  
Old November 15th 18, 12:29 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,865
Default cleaning the bike

On 11/14/2018 4:43 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?


The pithy Jim Mateja, car editor, Chicago Tribune:
Q What should I use to clean my vehicle?
A Teenagers.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #5  
Old November 15th 18, 12:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default cleaning the bike

Joerg: That's what I thought as well!
  #6  
Old November 15th 18, 02:28 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,504
Default cleaning the bike

On Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at 3:02:35 PM UTC-8, John B. slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 14 Nov 2018 23:43:17 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?


Well, the seals on bicycle wheels and the old traditional square
tapered shaft bottom brackets are not 100% sealed so I'd be a bit
apprehensive to wash the bike with a strong water spray. Say a power
washer, and if I washed a chain with soap and water I believe the step
#2 would be to re-lubricate the chain.


For modern bikes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ei8Kt2bfEE I have the Feedback washstand. https://www.biketiresdirect.com/prod...e/ffspr2-1.jpg -- which I got super-cheap on sale. It's great for washing road bikes. Spray and spin.

I would hesitate spraying down an old open bearing bike. Hub seals on old bikes were just dust caps. Shimano came up with mechanical seals for their hubs probably in the '80s. I'd just wipe down anything made before the '80s.. Campy pedals always had labyrinth seals and current Shimano SPDs have incredibly good labyrinth seals. I've ridden a set for years in sloppy weather, opened them up and the grease is still clean. You can blast those with a hose.

The commune's bike cleaning center needs to have a bucket and lots of brushes and some good biodegradable detergent -- and a work stand and shop with lots of grease and oil for apres cleaning.

I rarely clean my commuter, but it is a necessary exercise because it will just stop working if it gets too dirty -- and it is usually when I discover something is broken.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #7  
Old November 15th 18, 03:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,434
Default cleaning the bike

On 11/14/2018 6:29 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/14/2018 4:43 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?


The pithy Jim Mateja, car editor, Chicago Tribune:
Q* What should I use to clean my vehicle?
A* Teenagers.


That's what I use for cutting my lawn. Works well enough for me!


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #8  
Old November 15th 18, 04:08 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 16
Default cleaning the bike

Jay: I think it is a work in process at this point.

Video: Wow, he works fast! Why is it necessary to remove the wheels tho?
  #9  
Old November 15th 18, 08:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 293
Default cleaning the bike

On Thursday, November 15, 2018 at 2:28:18 AM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, November 14, 2018 at 3:02:35 PM UTC-8, John B. slocomb wrote:
On Wed, 14 Nov 2018 23:43:17 +0100, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

The commune is setting up a bike maintenance
station. There are no tools so far, or perhaps
because it is open 24/7 so if there were they
would disappear. But there is a strong light (to
examine the bike and do repairs), air, and
water with a strong beam to clean the bike.

There is where I'm a bit hesitant, don't you
flush away grease in layers and get water into
the the chain, and wash away lube?

About the layers in modern bikes, are they
"machine layers" (?), i.e. sealed in a small
cylinders or discs, or are they open as in old
bikes with or without retainers?

Should you clean your bike with that much force
and water?


Well, the seals on bicycle wheels and the old traditional square
tapered shaft bottom brackets are not 100% sealed so I'd be a bit
apprehensive to wash the bike with a strong water spray. Say a power
washer, and if I washed a chain with soap and water I believe the step
#2 would be to re-lubricate the chain.


For modern bikes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Ei8Kt2bfEE I have the Feedback washstand.


Hmm, first clean the greasy chain with the brush and than the other parts. I would do that in a different order or better use a different brush.

https://photos.app.goo.gl/XygcNrCuhwAsMGZAA

Lou
  #10  
Old November 15th 18, 09:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tanguy Ortolo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 38
Default cleaning the bike

Joerg, 2018-11-15 00:12+0100:
Clean the bike? Why? It ain't Christmas yet.

The last time my bikes have seen water and a sponge was, ahm, well, I
can't even remember. I found that after dried mud reaches a certain
thickness it falls off by itself or washes off during the next rainy
ride. So in essence the bikes clean themselves. Similar with my car.
Only my wife washes hers regularly. I guess women are different.


I concur, being in the exact same situation, except my wife just wants
to wash her bike, but never took time to do so. I am not reminding her,
as I think there are really more useful ways to spend one's time. And by
no means, is she getting anywhere near my bike with water, sponge or
brush!

--
Tanguy
 




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