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  #51  
Old November 12th 19, 12:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,973
Default Patent updates

On 11/11/2019 2:45 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 12:47 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/11/2019 11:13 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 5:23 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 23:42:10 -0800 (PST),
"
wrote:

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 12:57:07 PM UTC-6, Frank
Krygowski wrote:
But isn't it amazing what people will put up with for
aesthetics?

--
- Frank Krygowski

I personally am not familiar with the process. But I
believe thousands or millions of people dye their hair.
Purely for aesthetics. I see commercials on TV all the
time. I assume they re-dye their hair every week or two
or month or so. I don't know how often dye is required.
But I know its not a one time thing. Old people hair
naturally returns to its original gray, white, silver
color. Compared to dying your hair, I'm guessing fishing
internal cables through a bike frame once or twice a
decade is fairly minor and immaterial.

To further discuss my statement above: It's actually likely
that most buyers of high-end bikes don't ever think about
the downsides of internal cables. I suspect that most of
them will never ride the bikes enough to need cable
replacement. Of those that do, most will drop their bikes at
the LBS and pay whatever it costs, so they won't deal with
any of the possible frustrations. So their thinking will be
limited to a subliminal "Hey, that's trendy; I want it."

But more generally, people will go through a LOT of
inconvenience for aesthetics. One word: tattoos.

More words: Women's shoes. Manicured lawns. Washing one's
car every Saturday. Bike jerseys that match the bike color.
Etc.


Good Lord! You go to the Beauty Salon to get your hair
dyed. Which
also gives you a chance to get up to date with all the
current gossip
:-)

The book I'm reading, _Palaces for the People_, would praise
beauty salons as a place of community, where frequent
meetings lead to personal interaction, friendships and
relationships. The author says we need more places like
that. I can see his point.

_Jayber Crow_ by Wendell Barry is a sweet novel illustrating
the same thing, centered in a small town barber shop.


"people will go through a LOT of inconvenience for
aesthetics. One word: tattoos. "

pffft.
My 2d tattoo[1], $20 in 1973, had been a great value[2].
Name something you bought for $20 in 1973 you still own,
let alone enjoy.


The main inconvenience of tattoos, I've been told, is the
pain. My wife has a fascination with them and often asks
people about theirs. The most frequent answer to her "Did it
hurt?" is "YES!" Some then say "It was worth it." (One said
"What can I say? I was stupid.")

But whether you like having it or not is not the point. My
point was, you probably went though the pain for aesthetic
purposes.

As to what I own from that era: How about my K&E Deci-Lon
slide rule? (Sorry, I don't recall its 1966 price.) In my
desk drawer six inches from my knee. A functional tool, as
well as a thing of geeky beauty! ;-)

I'm also looking at a nice German air rifle, bought used in
about '73. It may soon have an appointment with the squirrel
I see trying to get to the bird feeder.

One of my earliest vinyl record purchases is still here and
brought out occasionally. _Medieval Roots_ by New York Pro
Musica. Still beautiful and exotic.

Other purely aesthetic objects from 1973? I can't think of
one right now - probably because my tastes have changed.
That's why I don't get tattoos.


You're a wise man of excellent taste, Frank. We have the
same slide rule of the same age, Never needs batteries and
no one ever 'borrows' it.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Ads
  #52  
Old November 12th 19, 12:28 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 502
Default Patent updates

On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:51:56 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/11/2019 12:32 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


How about those who have green lawns in a desert? What a waste of the most precious commodity a desert has = water.


Agreed!

I've spent considerable time wondering why we have lawns at all. I mean,
what a weird thing - whack down all the native vegetation, clear it out,
plant something that really doesn't want to grow here, spend hours (or
hire someone) to chop it to a socially approved height, remove or poison
anything else that might want to grow there, pay for water and chemicals...

The answers I've found are more complex than one might think, probably
going back to eastern Africa.



But how else can one play croquet? Or Bowls? Which was apparently
played as far back as the Middle Ages.
--

Cheers,

John B.
  #53  
Old November 12th 19, 12:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 585
Default Patent updates

On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 07:08:22 -0800, Andre Jute wrote:

On Monday, November 11, 2019 at 5:33:03 AM UTC, James wrote:
On 10/11/19 3:46 am, Andre Jute wrote:
On Thursday, November 7, 2019 at 11:51:27 PM UTC, James wrote:
On 8/11/19 6:31 am, AMuzi wrote:
We all pause to slap our foreheads. WTF? These are patentable
designs??

https://bikerumor.com/2019/11/04/pat...hydro-routing-

from-shimano-campy-causing-headaches-for-others/




Oh how I long for all electric wireless brakes and gears.


Preferably radio controlled.


Yes, that is the meaning of "wireless" in my reply above.

--
JS


Aha! Sorry, careless of me. I taught myself electronics -- with a lot
of help I found on the net and at suppliers -- out of Fritz
Langford-Smith's great text, The Radio Designer's Handbook, see
http://www.audio-talk.co.uk/fiultra/...MPS%20RDH.html Mr
Langford-Smith was employed at the Australian Wireless Company. I should
have remembered that.


AWA's last claim to fame was to forget their history in electronics and
shift their profit making to the stock market. Then when the inevitable
loss came, some poor bunny got it in the neck.

To complete their fall from grace, from being the premier private
electronics company in Australia, they were relegated to sub-sub
contractor on the Jindalee Over The Horizon Project.

Andre Jute Now let us praise famous men -- Ecclesiastes


About the only thing they seem to have left to posterity was to pass into
safe keeping part of the Tabulator built by George Julius.

  #54  
Old November 12th 19, 01:14 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,919
Default Patent updates

On 11/11/2019 6:28 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:51:56 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/11/2019 12:32 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


How about those who have green lawns in a desert? What a waste of the most precious commodity a desert has = water.


Agreed!

I've spent considerable time wondering why we have lawns at all. I mean,
what a weird thing - whack down all the native vegetation, clear it out,
plant something that really doesn't want to grow here, spend hours (or
hire someone) to chop it to a socially approved height, remove or poison
anything else that might want to grow there, pay for water and chemicals...

The answers I've found are more complex than one might think, probably
going back to eastern Africa.



But how else can one play croquet? Or Bowls? Which was apparently
played as far back as the Middle Ages.


Around here, with a large number of Italian descent, "bowls" is called
Bocce. The target ball is called the "Pauline," at least in our family.
(I don't know if that's capitalized or not.)

But there's a high degree of randomness in the play. None of the
siblings have a lawn that's the least bit smooth, and bounces and
deflections are wildly erratic. Body english isn't nearly enough to get
the ball to go where you want. "Magic words" are necessary pretty often
- usually, after a miss. ;-)


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #55  
Old November 12th 19, 01:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,973
Default Patent updates

On 11/11/2019 6:14 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 6:28 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:51:56 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/11/2019 12:32 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


How about those who have green lawns in a desert? What a
waste of the most precious commodity a desert has = water.

Agreed!

I've spent considerable time wondering why we have lawns
at all. I mean,
what a weird thing - whack down all the native
vegetation, clear it out,
plant something that really doesn't want to grow here,
spend hours (or
hire someone) to chop it to a socially approved height,
remove or poison
anything else that might want to grow there, pay for
water and chemicals...

The answers I've found are more complex than one might
think, probably
going back to eastern Africa.



But how else can one play croquet? Or Bowls? Which was
apparently
played as far back as the Middle Ages.


Around here, with a large number of Italian descent, "bowls"
is called Bocce. The target ball is called the "Pauline," at
least in our family. (I don't know if that's capitalized or
not.)

But there's a high degree of randomness in the play. None of
the siblings have a lawn that's the least bit smooth, and
bounces and deflections are wildly erratic. Body english
isn't nearly enough to get the ball to go where you want.
"Magic words" are necessary pretty often - usually, after a
miss. ;-)



Bocce makes more sense after the second glass of grappa.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #56  
Old November 12th 19, 02:36 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,919
Default Patent updates

On 11/11/2019 7:48 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/11/2019 6:14 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 6:28 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 15:51:56 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/11/2019 12:32 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


How about those who have green lawns in a desert? What a
waste of the most precious commodity a desert has = water.

Agreed!

I've spent considerable time wondering why we have lawns
at all. I mean,
what a weird thing - whack down all the native
vegetation, clear it out,
plant something that really doesn't want to grow here,
spend hours (or
hire someone) to chop it to a socially approved height,
remove or poison
anything else that might want to grow there, pay for
water and chemicals...

The answers I've found are more complex than one might
think, probably
going back to eastern Africa.


But how else can one play croquet? Or Bowls? Which was
apparently
played as far back as the Middle Ages.


Around here, with a large number of Italian descent, "bowls"
is called Bocce. The target ball is called the "Pauline," at
least in our family. (I don't know if that's capitalized or
not.)

But there's a high degree of randomness in the play. None of
the siblings have a lawn that's the least bit smooth, and
bounces and deflections are wildly erratic. Body english
isn't nearly enough to get the ball to go where you want.
"Magic words" are necessary pretty often - usually, after a
miss.** ;-)



Bocce makes more sense after the second glass of grappa.


So _that's_ the problem! We've been using beer!


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #57  
Old November 12th 19, 05:40 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,348
Default Patent updates

On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 12:13:47 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 11/11/2019 5:23 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 23:42:10 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 12:57:07 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:

But isn't it amazing what people will put up with for
aesthetics?

--
- Frank Krygowski

I personally am not familiar with the process. But I believe thousands or millions of people dye their hair. Purely for aesthetics. I see commercials on TV all the time. I assume they re-dye their hair every week or two or month or so. I don't know how often dye is required. But I know its not a one time thing. Old people hair naturally returns to its original gray, white, silver color. Compared to dying your hair, I'm guessing fishing internal cables through a bike frame once or twice a decade is fairly minor and immaterial.


To further discuss my statement above: It's actually likely that most
buyers of high-end bikes don't ever think about the downsides of
internal cables. I suspect that most of them will never ride the bikes
enough to need cable replacement. Of those that do, most will drop their
bikes at the LBS and pay whatever it costs, so they won't deal with any
of the possible frustrations. So their thinking will be limited to a
subliminal "Hey, that's trendy; I want it."

But more generally, people will go through a LOT of inconvenience for
aesthetics. One word: tattoos.

More words: Women's shoes. Manicured lawns. Washing one's car every
Saturday. Bike jerseys that match the bike color. Etc.


Good Lord! You go to the Beauty Salon to get your hair dyed. Which
also gives you a chance to get up to date with all the current gossip
:-)


The book I'm reading, _Palaces for the People_, would praise beauty
salons as a place of community, where frequent meetings lead to personal
interaction, friendships and relationships. The author says we need more
places like that. I can see his point.

Something the matter with your author's research. The local pub takes
the place of the beauty salon for men in many places :-)

_Jayber Crow_ by Wendell Barry is a sweet novel illustrating the same
thing, centered in a small town barber shop.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #58  
Old November 12th 19, 05:43 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,348
Default Patent updates

On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 09:32:59 -0800 (PST), Sir Ridesalot
wrote:

On Monday, 11 November 2019 12:13:51 UTC-5, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 5:23 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 23:42:10 -0800 (PST), "
wrote:

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 12:57:07 PM UTC-6, Frank Krygowski wrote:

But isn't it amazing what people will put up with for
aesthetics?

--
- Frank Krygowski

I personally am not familiar with the process. But I believe thousands or millions of people dye their hair. Purely for aesthetics. I see commercials on TV all the time. I assume they re-dye their hair every week or two or month or so. I don't know how often dye is required. But I know its not a one time thing. Old people hair naturally returns to its original gray, white, silver color. Compared to dying your hair, I'm guessing fishing internal cables through a bike frame once or twice a decade is fairly minor and immaterial.


To further discuss my statement above: It's actually likely that most
buyers of high-end bikes don't ever think about the downsides of
internal cables. I suspect that most of them will never ride the bikes
enough to need cable replacement. Of those that do, most will drop their
bikes at the LBS and pay whatever it costs, so they won't deal with any
of the possible frustrations. So their thinking will be limited to a
subliminal "Hey, that's trendy; I want it."

But more generally, people will go through a LOT of inconvenience for
aesthetics. One word: tattoos.

More words: Women's shoes. Manicured lawns. Washing one's car every
Saturday. Bike jerseys that match the bike color. Etc.


Good Lord! You go to the Beauty Salon to get your hair dyed. Which
also gives you a chance to get up to date with all the current gossip
:-)


The book I'm reading, _Palaces for the People_, would praise beauty
salons as a place of community, where frequent meetings lead to personal
interaction, friendships and relationships. The author says we need more
places like that. I can see his point.

_Jayber Crow_ by Wendell Barry is a sweet novel illustrating the same
thing, centered in a small town barber shop.

--
- Frank Krygowski


How about those who have green lawns in a desert? What a waste of the most precious commodity a desert has = water.

Cheers


Somewhere I visited, perhaps Arizona, or somewhere like that, had
outlawed lawn grass - too much water - and the Locals had replaced the
grass with "crushed rock".... painted green :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #59  
Old November 12th 19, 05:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,348
Default Patent updates

On Mon, 11 Nov 2019 11:47:12 -0600, AMuzi wrote:

On 11/11/2019 11:13 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 5:23 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 23:42:10 -0800 (PST),
"
wrote:

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 12:57:07 PM UTC-6, Frank
Krygowski wrote:
But isn't it amazing what people will put up with for
aesthetics?

--
- Frank Krygowski

I personally am not familiar with the process. But I
believe thousands or millions of people dye their hair.
Purely for aesthetics. I see commercials on TV all the
time. I assume they re-dye their hair every week or two
or month or so. I don't know how often dye is required.
But I know its not a one time thing. Old people hair
naturally returns to its original gray, white, silver
color. Compared to dying your hair, I'm guessing fishing
internal cables through a bike frame once or twice a
decade is fairly minor and immaterial.


To further discuss my statement above: It's actually likely
that most buyers of high-end bikes don't ever think about
the downsides of internal cables. I suspect that most of
them will never ride the bikes enough to need cable
replacement. Of those that do, most will drop their bikes at
the LBS and pay whatever it costs, so they won't deal with
any of the possible frustrations. So their thinking will be
limited to a subliminal "Hey, that's trendy; I want it."

But more generally, people will go through a LOT of
inconvenience for aesthetics. One word: tattoos.

More words: Women's shoes. Manicured lawns. Washing one's
car every Saturday. Bike jerseys that match the bike color.
Etc.


Good Lord! You go to the Beauty Salon to get your hair
dyed. Which
also gives you a chance to get up to date with all the
current gossip
:-)


The book I'm reading, _Palaces for the People_, would praise
beauty salons as a place of community, where frequent
meetings lead to personal interaction, friendships and
relationships. The author says we need more places like
that. I can see his point.

_Jayber Crow_ by Wendell Barry is a sweet novel illustrating
the same thing, centered in a small town barber shop.


"people will go through a LOT of inconvenience for
aesthetics. One word: tattoos. "

pffft.
My 2d tattoo[1], $20 in 1973, had been a great value[2].
Name something you bought for $20 in 1973 you still own, let
alone enjoy.

[1] I did my first myself. Not recommended.

Jail house tattoo?

[2] et seq- all the rest are equally long lasting.


As you grow older your skin thins and sags and the pretty little
humming bird that you had tattooed on your shoulder turns into a
vulture :-)

Jeff Foxworthy has a whole routine about getting tattoos :-)
"You might be a redneck if...
you have a tattoo that says "Born to bag groceries." :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #60  
Old November 12th 19, 08:34 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 560
Default Patent updates

On Tuesday, November 12, 2019 at 12:19:32 AM UTC+1, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/11/2019 2:45 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 12:47 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 11/11/2019 11:13 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 11/11/2019 5:23 AM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Sun, 10 Nov 2019 23:42:10 -0800 (PST),
"
wrote:

On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 12:57:07 PM UTC-6, Frank
Krygowski wrote:
But isn't it amazing what people will put up with for
aesthetics?

--
- Frank Krygowski

I personally am not familiar with the process. But I
believe thousands or millions of people dye their hair.
Purely for aesthetics. I see commercials on TV all the
time. I assume they re-dye their hair every week or two
or month or so. I don't know how often dye is required.
But I know its not a one time thing. Old people hair
naturally returns to its original gray, white, silver
color. Compared to dying your hair, I'm guessing fishing
internal cables through a bike frame once or twice a
decade is fairly minor and immaterial.

To further discuss my statement above: It's actually likely
that most buyers of high-end bikes don't ever think about
the downsides of internal cables. I suspect that most of
them will never ride the bikes enough to need cable
replacement. Of those that do, most will drop their bikes at
the LBS and pay whatever it costs, so they won't deal with
any of the possible frustrations. So their thinking will be
limited to a subliminal "Hey, that's trendy; I want it."

But more generally, people will go through a LOT of
inconvenience for aesthetics. One word: tattoos.

More words: Women's shoes. Manicured lawns. Washing one's
car every Saturday. Bike jerseys that match the bike color.
Etc.


Good Lord! You go to the Beauty Salon to get your hair
dyed. Which
also gives you a chance to get up to date with all the
current gossip
:-)

The book I'm reading, _Palaces for the People_, would praise
beauty salons as a place of community, where frequent
meetings lead to personal interaction, friendships and
relationships. The author says we need more places like
that. I can see his point.

_Jayber Crow_ by Wendell Barry is a sweet novel illustrating
the same thing, centered in a small town barber shop.


"people will go through a LOT of inconvenience for
aesthetics. One word: tattoos. "

pffft.
My 2d tattoo[1], $20 in 1973, had been a great value[2].
Name something you bought for $20 in 1973 you still own,
let alone enjoy.


The main inconvenience of tattoos, I've been told, is the
pain. My wife has a fascination with them and often asks
people about theirs. The most frequent answer to her "Did it
hurt?" is "YES!" Some then say "It was worth it." (One said
"What can I say? I was stupid.")

But whether you like having it or not is not the point. My
point was, you probably went though the pain for aesthetic
purposes.

As to what I own from that era: How about my K&E Deci-Lon
slide rule? (Sorry, I don't recall its 1966 price.) In my
desk drawer six inches from my knee. A functional tool, as
well as a thing of geeky beauty! ;-)

I'm also looking at a nice German air rifle, bought used in
about '73. It may soon have an appointment with the squirrel
I see trying to get to the bird feeder.

One of my earliest vinyl record purchases is still here and
brought out occasionally. _Medieval Roots_ by New York Pro
Musica. Still beautiful and exotic.

Other purely aesthetic objects from 1973? I can't think of
one right now - probably because my tastes have changed.
That's why I don't get tattoos.


You're a wise man of excellent taste, Frank. We have the
same slide rule of the same age, Never needs batteries and
no one ever 'borrows' it.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I still have a slide ruler somewhere for nostalgic reasons but I (still) use fountain pens to write and I have a HP '2.5 ENTER 3 x' calculator (hp11c) for 35 years. These also never get 'borrowed'.

Lou
 




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