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hex entry at the back of pedal



 
 
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  #21  
Old September 30th 18, 11:39 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
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Posts: 1,202
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 2018-09-30 01:02, news18 wrote:
On Sat, 29 Sep 2018 19:49:42 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:

was skeptical about its adequacy when we first got the bikes, but I've
used it many times without problems. Pedal spindles tend to self-tighten
into the crank arms anyway. Getting them out is more of a problem than
tightening them sufficiently.


IME, I found a touch of grease on the thread makes it easier to remove
them when required without resaorting to major toolage. It is part of my
regular bearing maintenance.


Miss! MISS!! He put grease on his threads Miss! Tell him Miss, tell him!!



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  #22  
Old September 30th 18, 12:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Default hex entry at the back of pedal

jbeattie wrote:

I'm not sure if I'm following, but all you do
is put an 8mm hex socket on your torque
wrench.
https://images.homedepot-static.com/...77-64_1000.jpg
Or buy an el-cheapo 8mm pedal wrench and just
give it a good hard push.


Right, that's a much better idea than the open
end spanner approach.

Maybe others have a more scientific approach.


Well, not me, I never thought of pedals in
terms of torque before David Scheidt mentioned
35-40nm, but it can be fun to do. When I did
the single speed steel bikes I always used the
torque wrench to put the wheel axle dome nuts
in 28-32nm, because that was what Shimano
recommended for their coaster brakes. I never
met anyone else who bothered, but I thought the
torque wrench (with deep weel sockets, 14 or
15mm) was just an interesting tool

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  #23  
Old September 30th 18, 12:18 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Default hex entry at the back of pedal

BTW I just checked the pedals which I replaced
the fancy ones with and they don't come with an
allen/hex broach anywhere on the pedal
spindle/axle, or anywhere else for that
matter

Maybe this is yet another indication how much,
or little, people care about the exact pedal
torque

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underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #24  
Old September 30th 18, 04:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Default hex entry at the back of pedal

(with deep weel sockets

*wall

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underground experts united
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  #25  
Old September 30th 18, 07:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
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Default hex entry at the back of pedal

Emanuel Berg wrote:
: (with deep weel sockets

:*wall

well.

deep well socket,

https://www.irwin.com/tools/impact-a...p-well-sockets



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sig 61
  #26  
Old September 30th 18, 09:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
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Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 9/29/2018 11:12 AM, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike
with regular ones, which are just commodity
items from the hardware store. The modern
pedals are too short and, without using such
shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.

Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for
a hex key at the back of the pedal "screw
block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the
single speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long
pipe, a 15mm wrench, a string to hold the crank
to the chainstay, CRC 5-56 (probably not needed
even), left pedal LT, right pedal regular, and
so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and
when do you use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts
and terminology? I image googled but didn't
find anything to that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg


offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007


Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach only on
the inside.


And some pedals (~10 year old Time ATAC) omit the wrench flats and have
a /6mm/ allen socket (broach?) only on the inside. It's a bad design,
IMHO, and the 8mm socket works far better.

Mark J.
  #27  
Old September 30th 18, 09:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Default hex entry at the back of pedal

David Scheidt wrote:

well.

deep well socket


From now on I'll stop correcting my own typos.
Actually they are not really typos BTW. I do it
in my speech all the time, e.g., say "tanks
a lot" instead of "thanks". Something with my
brain that doesn't click. Well, I suppose
I trivial problem in the grande scheme
of things.

--
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http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #28  
Old September 30th 18, 09:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
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Posts: 1,035
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

well.

deep well socket


From now on I'll stop correcting my own
typos. Actually they are not really typos
BTW. I do it in my speech all the time, e.g.,
say "tanks a lot" instead of "thanks".
Something with my brain that doesn't click.
Well, I suppose I trivial problem in the
grande scheme


*a trivial problem. Case in point

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #29  
Old October 2nd 18, 12:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 5,552
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 2018-09-29 14:01, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 1:19:02 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 13:12, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 12:36:21 PM UTC-7, Joerg
wrote:
On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:
On 9/29/2018 12:59 PM, Emanuel Berg wrote:
Today I replaced the pedals on a modern bike with regular
ones, which are just commodity items from the hardware
store. The modern pedals are too short and, without using
such shoes, the interface to fixate them becomes an
uncomfortable blob under the foot.


You aren't supposed to ride click pedals with regular shoes
:-)


Anyway first thing I noticed was an entry for a hex key at
the back of the pedal "screw block" (?)

I removed the pedals just like a would with the single
speed, old steel bikes, i.e. a long pipe, a 15mm wrench, a
string to hold the crank to the chainstay, CRC 5-56
(probably not needed even), left pedal LT, right pedal
regular, and so very little force needed for the pedal to
come loose.

So what is the reason for the hex entry and when do you
use it?

BTW does anyone have an image with pedal parts and
terminology? I image googled but didn't find anything to
that end.


Pedal spindle (or axle - people use both terms) with allen
broach:
https://outdoorgearlab-mvnab3pwrvp3t...46_3693_XL.jpg






offers faster assembly:
http://i.ebayimg.com/00/$%28KGrHqZ,!lIE2EP64yPuBNhl+JMIDw~~_35.JPG?set_id= 8800005007






Or use a power drill with an allen bit in there, faster. We even use a
power drill to make bread dough.


Fully tighten, or break free to remove, with 15mm pedal
wrench.

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen
broach only on the inside.


That sounds scary, I'd never buy those. 8mm ist too wimpy for
a nice tight fit.

Virtually every rider in the pro peleton has pedals tightened
with an 8mm hex wrench.
https://www.excelsports.com/assets/z...y/112594-5.jpg
It's not a problem.



But those guys don't weigh over 200lbs :-)


Yah, but the pros produce two or three times your power and a much
higher seated crank bending load than you do. I raced for years at
the 200lb mark and bent or broke some pedal spindles -- with flats
(early Look and early DuraAce which were re-branded Look). I've never
had a problem with the 8mm hex spindle on recent Looks or the XT
level Shimano SPD pedals that are hex-only. Those things are bullet
proof. Plenty of big boys ride the Shimano road pedals. The design is
inconvenient, but it is not scary or dangerous.


True, it shouldn't present a danger. It just doesn't make much sense.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #30  
Old October 16th 18, 10:02 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Gregory Sutter
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Posts: 162
Default hex entry at the back of pedal

On 2018-09-29, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 13:12, jbeattie wrote:
On Saturday, September 29, 2018 at 12:36:21 PM UTC-7, Joerg wrote:
On 2018-09-29 11:12, AMuzi wrote:

Some pedals omit the wrench flats and have an 8mm allen broach
only on the inside.


It's just inconvenient as compared to the old days of
wrench flats.


It sure looks like it but probably shaves off a couple of grams in
weight so you can arrive 200 microseconds earlier than the other guy.


Right. It's a buffer so you can use 500ms posting-up before the line.

http://****yeahwhoops.tumblr.com/

--
Gregory S. Sutter Mostly Harmless

http://zer0.org/~gsutter/
 




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