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Kuma Bicycle Company



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 12th 18, 07:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 102
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.


Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
Ads
  #2  
Old October 12th 18, 07:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
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Posts: 6
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:24:07 PM UTC-5, wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.


Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO


Thank you so much for pointing it out Andrew. I posted hastily. So, yes, it is
  #3  
Old October 12th 18, 08:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,771
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.


Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/



Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #4  
Old October 12th 18, 09:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.


Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/



Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #5  
Old October 13th 18, 12:23 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 312
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:03:49 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.

Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/



Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


The CX is a damn good looking bike. After seeing some CF bikes break for no discernable reason I was worried about them. I did a LOT of research and am now of the conclusion that what we have seen is little more than growing pains of a relatively new technology.

As a suggestion I would think it might be a very good idea to lay a couple of layers of graphene in between the carbon fiber layers. Done correctly I think you could kiss off ever seeing a frame failure.
  #6  
Old October 13th 18, 01:10 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,771
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On 10/12/2018 6:23 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:03:49 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM,
wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.

Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/


Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.


The CX is a damn good looking bike. After seeing some CF bikes break for no discernable reason I was worried about them. I did a LOT of research and am now of the conclusion that what we have seen is little more than growing pains of a relatively new technology.

As a suggestion I would think it might be a very good idea to lay a couple of layers of graphene in between the carbon fiber layers. Done correctly I think you could kiss off ever seeing a frame failure.


Maybe, maybe not.
https://phys.org/news/2016-02-graphe...ong-tough.html

Right now best technology is carbon and other fibers
randomly aligned then pressure molded. This seems, in
practice, to perform better than multilayer sheets.

For example, look at your Campagnolo cranks in a good light.
The random shapes in random directions perform very well as
compared to older designs.
https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Com...ecord_crankset

For frames, pressure molding is prohibitive so misaligned
sheet layers are a reasonable path.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #7  
Old October 13th 18, 01:32 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,429
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 5:10:21 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 6:23 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:03:49 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM,
wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.

Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/


Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.


The CX is a damn good looking bike. After seeing some CF bikes break for no discernable reason I was worried about them. I did a LOT of research and am now of the conclusion that what we have seen is little more than growing pains of a relatively new technology.

As a suggestion I would think it might be a very good idea to lay a couple of layers of graphene in between the carbon fiber layers. Done correctly I think you could kiss off ever seeing a frame failure.


Maybe, maybe not.
https://phys.org/news/2016-02-graphe...ong-tough.html

Right now best technology is carbon and other fibers
randomly aligned then pressure molded. This seems, in
practice, to perform better than multilayer sheets.

For example, look at your Campagnolo cranks in a good light.
The random shapes in random directions perform very well as
compared to older designs.
https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Com...ecord_crankset

For frames, pressure molding is prohibitive so misaligned
sheet layers are a reasonable path.


The problem with carbon cranks are the pedal thread inserts. I had an OE SRAM Red crank on a SuperSix, and the pedal thread insert broke on that. I had the same problem on an aftermarket FSA crank -- not that I expect much from FSA (Failure Speedily Approaching). I think the crank arms themselves are plenty strong, but the mixing and matching of materials needs work. I have mostly Shimano cranks with Wheels MFG shims. The Kuma looks like it uses a threaded BB, which IMO, is the right approach -- although I'm now personally stuck with a lot of BB30 variants.

-- Jay Beattie.
  #8  
Old October 13th 18, 01:35 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 312
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 5:10:21 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 6:23 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:03:49 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM,
wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.

Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/


Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.


The CX is a damn good looking bike. After seeing some CF bikes break for no discernable reason I was worried about them. I did a LOT of research and am now of the conclusion that what we have seen is little more than growing pains of a relatively new technology.

As a suggestion I would think it might be a very good idea to lay a couple of layers of graphene in between the carbon fiber layers. Done correctly I think you could kiss off ever seeing a frame failure.


Maybe, maybe not.
https://phys.org/news/2016-02-graphe...ong-tough.html

Right now best technology is carbon and other fibers
randomly aligned then pressure molded. This seems, in
practice, to perform better than multilayer sheets.

For example, look at your Campagnolo cranks in a good light.
The random shapes in random directions perform very well as
compared to older designs.
https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Com...ecord_crankset

For frames, pressure molding is prohibitive so misaligned
sheet layers are a reasonable path.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


That's why I said to put it between the layers. Graphene is somewhat flexible but in tension it is the strongest material known.
  #9  
Old October 13th 18, 01:41 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

Yes, threaded. I am not a firm believer of the other kind... yet. I am working on frame #5 so I have two at CX races. I am still trying to configure the painjob and logo design for it. All pink, partially pink. purple... AAAAA!!!

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 7:32:48 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 5:10:21 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 6:23 PM, wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:03:49 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM,
wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.

Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/


Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.


The CX is a damn good looking bike. After seeing some CF bikes break for no discernable reason I was worried about them. I did a LOT of research and am now of the conclusion that what we have seen is little more than growing pains of a relatively new technology.

As a suggestion I would think it might be a very good idea to lay a couple of layers of graphene in between the carbon fiber layers. Done correctly I think you could kiss off ever seeing a frame failure.


Maybe, maybe not.
https://phys.org/news/2016-02-graphe...ong-tough.html

Right now best technology is carbon and other fibers
randomly aligned then pressure molded. This seems, in
practice, to perform better than multilayer sheets.

For example, look at your Campagnolo cranks in a good light.
The random shapes in random directions perform very well as
compared to older designs.
https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Com...ecord_crankset

For frames, pressure molding is prohibitive so misaligned
sheet layers are a reasonable path.


The problem with carbon cranks are the pedal thread inserts. I had an OE SRAM Red crank on a SuperSix, and the pedal thread insert broke on that. I had the same problem on an aftermarket FSA crank -- not that I expect much from FSA (Failure Speedily Approaching). I think the crank arms themselves are plenty strong, but the mixing and matching of materials needs work. I have mostly Shimano cranks with Wheels MFG shims. The Kuma looks like it uses a threaded BB, which IMO, is the right approach -- although I'm now personally stuck with a lot of BB30 variants.

-- Jay Beattie.


  #10  
Old October 13th 18, 01:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,771
Default Kuma Bicycle Company

On 10/12/2018 7:41 PM, wrote:
Yes, threaded. I am not a firm believer of the other kind... yet. I am working on frame #5 so I have two at CX races. I am still trying to configure the painjob and logo design for it. All pink, partially pink. purple... AAAAA!!!

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 7:32:48 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 5:10:21 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 6:23 PM,
wrote:
On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 1:03:49 PM UTC-7, wrote:
Thank you Andrew!

E

On Friday, October 12, 2018 at 2:52:11 PM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
On 10/12/2018 1:24 PM,
wrote:
On Friday, October 5, 2018 at 7:24:51 AM UTC-4, wrote:
www.kumabicyclecompany.
Slowly getting traction.

Your post might have helped them get more traction if you had posted a complete link.
https://www.kumabicyclecompany.com/


Did a quick perusal, assumed another chinese 'brand'. But
no, these are Chicago built carbon frames. Amazing. Wish
them well.

The CX is a damn good looking bike. After seeing some CF bikes break for no discernable reason I was worried about them. I did a LOT of research and am now of the conclusion that what we have seen is little more than growing pains of a relatively new technology.

As a suggestion I would think it might be a very good idea to lay a couple of layers of graphene in between the carbon fiber layers. Done correctly I think you could kiss off ever seeing a frame failure.


Maybe, maybe not.
https://phys.org/news/2016-02-graphe...ong-tough.html

Right now best technology is carbon and other fibers
randomly aligned then pressure molded. This seems, in
practice, to perform better than multilayer sheets.

For example, look at your Campagnolo cranks in a good light.
The random shapes in random directions perform very well as
compared to older designs.
https://www.campagnolo.com/US/en/Com...ecord_crankset

For frames, pressure molding is prohibitive so misaligned
sheet layers are a reasonable path.


The problem with carbon cranks are the pedal thread inserts. I had an OE SRAM Red crank on a SuperSix, and the pedal thread insert broke on that. I had the same problem on an aftermarket FSA crank -- not that I expect much from FSA (Failure Speedily Approaching). I think the crank arms themselves are plenty strong, but the mixing and matching of materials needs work. I have mostly Shimano cranks with Wheels MFG shims. The Kuma looks like it uses a threaded BB, which IMO, is the right approach -- although I'm now personally stuck with a lot of BB30 variants.

-- Jay Beattie.



You're the builder?
Why did you spell out 'ku ma' in kana rather than using the
kanji?

https://www.stockkanji.com/images/wo...eri-takase.gif

As long as I'm being pedantic, you might try replies below
previous for readability.
http://html-faq.com/etiquette/?toppost

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


 




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