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  #11  
Old July 21st 20, 09:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,174
Default Tire width

On 7/21/2020 1:52 PM, wrote:
On Monday, July 20, 2020 at 5:10:44 PM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM,
wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using 5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient air
pressure and humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are
definitely faster than worn (flat center) tires.


The Vittoria tires show no flat spots and are reportedly the tires with the lowest rolling resistance.


If that's rolling resistance as measured by a smooth drum test, I don't
think it's worth much.


--
- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #12  
Old July 21st 20, 11:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Tire width

On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 12:08:50 PM UTC-7, Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 8:07:06 PM UTC+2, wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 10:35:04 AM UTC-7, Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient air pressure and
humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are definitely faster than worn (flat
center) tires.

I wonder if there's data proving that. It's the kind of thing that's
really ripe for the placebo effect: "I put on new tires and they're SO
much better!"

Sort of related: I remember way back when some tires were sold with a
narrower center belt of rubber that protruded farther than the rest of
the tread surface. That center stripe might have been about 10mm wide on
a 32mm tire. As I recall, they were claimed to reduce rolling
resistance. It may have been Jobst who showed they increased it instead.

--
- Frank Krygowski

I ignore all claims comparing different tire widths if the tires are not the same make and type. Let alone the riding conditions and fitness. That is ridiculous.

Lou


Up to a point I agree with you. But the place where the radar speed sign is I have often gone by it and I am quite familiar with the speed I normally get there on several different bikes. And they are all comparable. In is in a canyon that blocks a great deal of the wind except at the very top of the climb.

Talking about same brand and model of tires is ridiculous when we have tire rolling resistance tests that show that my slower speeds were on faster tires. And high speeds on a slower tire. We know that the pro racers who are much smaller and lighter than I am are using tires much wider for their weight than I was doing.

I noticed this same rather surprising increase in speeds several years ago and wrote about it then. Again, I'm pretty convinced that it has to do with the vertical compliance instead of the rolling resistance. I will keep an eye on it and see. Do you think it could be that clinchers somehow roll faster than tubeless? Regardless of the various tests I didn't see any real decrease in rolling resistance with Tubeless so it must be pretty small.


At the moment I'm trying to compare Continental GP 5000 25 mm tires (7 bar pressure) on my Canyon Aeroad (7.2 kg) with Continental GP 5000 32 mm tires (5 bar pressure) on my Moots gravel bike (9.2 kg) both on the same Zipp rims. After several rides I still can't draw any conclusions. I only noticed and surprised that I am pretty fast on that tank of a gravel bike with aerodynamics of a hippo. I'm very pleased with that.

Lou


When and did that ride again with the 25 mm tires. So of course the wind was coming right up the canyon. That's pretty rare. Coming off the hill I notice I don't let it go anymore. I suppose I'm gaining good sense in my old age. As I was approaching the radar speed sign, A light truck passed me. My speed in his draft increased to 26 mph and as soon as the draft broken I was going 24 mph. None of this means much except the 25's are about as comfortable ss sleeping on tacks. I have a superlight saddle and didn't take my flat kit be cause it won't fit on the oval rails. With the water bottle and the superlight saddle 18.63 lbs for the Madone with manual DuraAce. Once you get used to Di2 you miss it. I almost have the Colnago set up with Di2 All I need are the wires. Damned expensive at about $140. But I suppose they last forever.
  #13  
Old July 22nd 20, 01:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 12,012
Default Tire width

On 7/21/2020 10:10 AM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to
revisit it. I have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm
tires. Somehow I had gotten the idea that these were
faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using 5 or so
years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to
clinchers again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm
clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill
section I travel on regularly. There is a radar speed
limit sign on this route so that I can double check my
speedo. My speed through this rough area is normally 24
mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and
the radar reported 26 mph through this section. And the
fatter tires at a 10 psi less inflation pressure rode so
much smoother that I cannot for the life of me remember
why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not
ride that Time with 23's on it unless you had a butt of
cast iron. When I changed to the 28's on the Time it was
and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure
there is some dividing point though I don't know where
that might be since the Tour riders are using 26 mm
sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you I won't
make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from
now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient
air pressure and humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are
definitely faster than worn (flat center) tires.


I wonder if there's data proving that. It's the kind of
thing that's really ripe for the placebo effect: "I put on
new tires and they're SO much better!"

Sort of related: I remember way back when some tires were
sold with a narrower center belt of rubber that protruded
farther than the rest of the tread surface. That center
stripe might have been about 10mm wide on a 32mm tire. As I
recall, they were claimed to reduce rolling resistance. It
may have been Jobst who showed they increased it instead.


That's right.

I was thinking more along the lines of Michelin Pro and
similar in 23-25-28 for road bikes. Wear probably doesn't
affect fat tires for crr, or at least minimally.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #14  
Old July 22nd 20, 08:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,969
Default Tire width

On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 6:35:04 PM UTC+1, Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.

  #15  
Old July 31st 20, 09:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 258
Default Tire width

Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient air pressure and
humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are definitely faster than worn (flat
center) tires.


I wonder if there's data proving that. It's the kind of thing that's
really ripe for the placebo effect: "I put on new tires and they're SO
much better!"

Sort of related: I remember way back when some tires were sold with a
narrower center belt of rubber that protruded farther than the rest of
the tread surface. That center stripe might have been about 10mm wide on
a 32mm tire. As I recall, they were claimed to reduce rolling
resistance. It may have been Jobst who showed they increased it instead.

--
- Frank Krygowski


I ignore all claims comparing different tire widths if the tires are not
the same make and type. Let alone the riding conditions and fitness. That is ridiculous.

Lou


I’ve used Strava for best part of a decade now over quite a few bikes from
old steel bike with down tube shifters, a SS road bike, CX and Gravel bike.

There is surprising little difference, what seems to make the difference is
how fit and how much I’ve tried! The bike within reason makes little
difference.

Don’t get me wrong having a full suspension MTB plus Gravel can be big
differences as the Gravel is fair bit quicker on smoother stuff, but though
it can do it, the MTB can monster down rocky tracks that the Gravel you
have to pick your way through.

In short the rider seems to be the big difference, I notice how tyres feel
but and grip and how robust they are, CX tyres seem to be made of paper
being race tyres! Hence moving to cheaper/heavier hybrid/Gravel tyres that
feel just if not more grippy, my times are static, and the tyres I’ve yet
to rip which is a 1st!

Roger Merriman

  #16  
Old July 31st 20, 04:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Tire width

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 1:53:05 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.

  #17  
Old July 31st 20, 07:27 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Lou Holtman[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 455
Default Tire width

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 5:53:46 PM UTC+2, wrote:
On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 1:53:05 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it.. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient air pressure and
humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are definitely faster than worn (flat
center) tires.

I wonder if there's data proving that. It's the kind of thing that's
really ripe for the placebo effect: "I put on new tires and they're SO
much better!"

Sort of related: I remember way back when some tires were sold with a
narrower center belt of rubber that protruded farther than the rest of
the tread surface. That center stripe might have been about 10mm wide on
a 32mm tire. As I recall, they were claimed to reduce rolling
resistance. It may have been Jobst who showed they increased it instead.

--
- Frank Krygowski

I ignore all claims comparing different tire widths if the tires are not
the same make and type. Let alone the riding conditions and fitness. That is ridiculous.

Lou


I’ve used Strava for best part of a decade now over quite a few bikes from
old steel bike with down tube shifters, a SS road bike, CX and Gravel bike.

There is surprising little difference, what seems to make the difference is
how fit and how much I’ve tried! The bike within reason makes little
difference.

Don’t get me wrong having a full suspension MTB plus Gravel can be big
differences as the Gravel is fair bit quicker on smoother stuff, but though
it can do it, the MTB can monster down rocky tracks that the Gravel you
have to pick your way through.

In short the rider seems to be the big difference, I notice how tyres feel
but and grip and how robust they are, CX tyres seem to be made of paper
being race tyres! Hence moving to cheaper/heavier hybrid/Gravel tyres that
feel just if not more grippy, my times are static, and the tyres I’ve yet
to rip which is a 1st!

Roger Merriman


Have you or anyone else used Continental 4 Seasons which are supposed to have more puncture protection than Gatorskins? I bought a set since I just bought a new set of Campy Clincher wheels. Are the 4 Seasons really high rolling resistance to the point where you would notice it?


I use them during the dark season. Never had a puncture with those tires. RR is OK'ish. Expensive tire BTW.

Lou
  #18  
Old July 31st 20, 08:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Tire width

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 11:27:09 AM UTC-7, Lou Holtman wrote:
On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 5:53:46 PM UTC+2, wrote:
On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 1:53:05 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient air pressure and
humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are definitely faster than worn (flat
center) tires.

I wonder if there's data proving that. It's the kind of thing that's
really ripe for the placebo effect: "I put on new tires and they're SO
much better!"

Sort of related: I remember way back when some tires were sold with a
narrower center belt of rubber that protruded farther than the rest of
the tread surface. That center stripe might have been about 10mm wide on
a 32mm tire. As I recall, they were claimed to reduce rolling
resistance. It may have been Jobst who showed they increased it instead.

--
- Frank Krygowski

I ignore all claims comparing different tire widths if the tires are not
the same make and type. Let alone the riding conditions and fitness.. That is ridiculous.

Lou


I’ve used Strava for best part of a decade now over quite a few bikes from
old steel bike with down tube shifters, a SS road bike, CX and Gravel bike.

There is surprising little difference, what seems to make the difference is
how fit and how much I’ve tried! The bike within reason makes little
difference.

Don’t get me wrong having a full suspension MTB plus Gravel can be big
differences as the Gravel is fair bit quicker on smoother stuff, but though
it can do it, the MTB can monster down rocky tracks that the Gravel you
have to pick your way through.

In short the rider seems to be the big difference, I notice how tyres feel
but and grip and how robust they are, CX tyres seem to be made of paper
being race tyres! Hence moving to cheaper/heavier hybrid/Gravel tyres that
feel just if not more grippy, my times are static, and the tyres I’ve yet
to rip which is a 1st!

Roger Merriman


Have you or anyone else used Continental 4 Seasons which are supposed to have more puncture protection than Gatorskins? I bought a set since I just bought a new set of Campy Clincher wheels. Are the 4 Seasons really high rolling resistance to the point where you would notice it?


I use them during the dark season. Never had a puncture with those tires. RR is OK'ish. Expensive tire BTW.

Lou


Thanks Lou. My Campy Sirocco's just came in and I intend to put them on those wheels.
  #19  
Old July 31st 20, 08:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Tire width

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 1:53:05 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.

  #20  
Old July 31st 20, 10:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Roger Merriman[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 258
Default Tire width

wrote:
On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 1:53:05 AM UTC-7, Roger Merriman wrote:
Lou Holtman wrote:
On Tuesday, July 21, 2020 at 5:10:32 PM UTC+2, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/20/2020 8:10 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 7/20/2020 6:34 PM, wrote:
I think we had this discussion before but it is time to revisit it. I
have been riding Vittoria Corse G+ 25 mm tires. Somehow I had gotten
the idea that these were faster than the 28 mm tires I had been using
5 or so years ago. Well, Since I have been switching over to clinchers
again I got a set of Michelin Power 28 mm clinchers.

There is a sharp descent and a long slightly downhill section I travel
on regularly. There is a radar speed limit sign on this route so that
I can double check my speedo. My speed through this rough area is
normally 24 mph on the sign and about that on my speedo. I just
changed over to the 28 mm tires and did that section and the radar
reported 26 mph through this section. And the fatter tires at a 10 psi
less inflation pressure rode so much smoother that I cannot for the
life of me remember why I changed to the 25's.

Before I had 23's on my Time and you simply could not ride that Time
with 23's on it unless you had a butt of cast iron. When I changed to
the 28's on the Time it was and entirely different bike.

As you probably know, I am 6'4" and 190 lbs so I'm sure there is some
dividing point though I don't know where that might be since the Tour
riders are using 26 mm sew-up tires on their bikes. But I can tell you
I won't make that mistake again and I will be riding 28's from now on.



I don't know but there are more factors such as ambient air pressure and
humidity, wind etc. Also new tires are definitely faster than worn (flat
center) tires.

I wonder if there's data proving that. It's the kind of thing that's
really ripe for the placebo effect: "I put on new tires and they're SO
much better!"

Sort of related: I remember way back when some tires were sold with a
narrower center belt of rubber that protruded farther than the rest of
the tread surface. That center stripe might have been about 10mm wide on
a 32mm tire. As I recall, they were claimed to reduce rolling
resistance. It may have been Jobst who showed they increased it instead.

--
- Frank Krygowski

I ignore all claims comparing different tire widths if the tires are not
the same make and type. Let alone the riding conditions and fitness. That is ridiculous.

Lou


I’ve used Strava for best part of a decade now over quite a few bikes from
old steel bike with down tube shifters, a SS road bike, CX and Gravel bike.

There is surprising little difference, what seems to make the difference is
how fit and how much I’ve tried! The bike within reason makes little
difference.

Don’t get me wrong having a full suspension MTB plus Gravel can be big
differences as the Gravel is fair bit quicker on smoother stuff, but though
it can do it, the MTB can monster down rocky tracks that the Gravel you
have to pick your way through.

In short the rider seems to be the big difference, I notice how tyres feel
but and grip and how robust they are, CX tyres seem to be made of paper
being race tyres! Hence moving to cheaper/heavier hybrid/Gravel tyres that
feel just if not more grippy, my times are static, and the tyres I’ve yet
to rip which is a 1st!

Roger Merriman


Have you or anyone else used Continental 4 Seasons which are supposed to
have more puncture protection than Gatorskins? I bought a set since I
just bought a new set of Campy Clincher wheels. Are the 4 Seasons really
high rolling resistance to the point where you would notice it?


I used them though haven’t for many years, much nicer than the Gatorskins
which unless they have changed dramatically, gave a fairly wooden ride,
plus fairly terrible grip in the wet.

Being critical I’d say that a budget training tyre is fairly close to
4seasons which are better but not that much so.

Roger Merriman

 




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