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  #1  
Old July 22nd 20, 03:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 11,995
Default Bicycle Security News

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971

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  #2  
Old July 22nd 20, 05:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 884
Default Bicycle Security News

On Wednesday, July 22, 2020 at 7:12:01 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


The material is real and a lock made out of that would soon teach thieves that it doesn't pay to try and break that sort of lock.
  #3  
Old July 22nd 20, 11:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 4,103
Default Bicycle Security News

On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/


See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #4  
Old July 23rd 20, 03:16 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
bob prohaska
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Posts: 80
Default Bicycle Security News

John B. wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/


See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--


I vote fake. The description says aluminum, the sparks say steel and the
grinder says soft. Not sure if the fake is intentional or accidental, but
the story so far does not add up.

Hope this doesn't offend too much,

bob prohaska

  #5  
Old July 23rd 20, 03:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11,995
Default Bicycle Security News

On 7/22/2020 9:16 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/


See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--


I vote fake. The description says aluminum, the sparks say steel and the
grinder says soft. Not sure if the fake is intentional or accidental, but
the story so far does not add up.

Hope this doesn't offend too much,

bob prohaska


In my capacity of regularly removing 'impenetrable' locks
with lost keys from bicycles, I scoff at the term 'cut proof'

Here's an example. There's a cute elegant little lock with
14mm tempered aluminum shackle and body, 'can't be cut with
disc grinder'. Yeah, so what? There are many methods for
many materials. If the thief with a battery disc grinder is
thwarted, the next guy will break it differently.

Oh, and the savages are just as likely to bash in your
wheels as steal your bike anyway...

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #6  
Old July 23rd 20, 10:37 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
bob prohaska
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Bicycle Security News

AMuzi wrote:
On 7/22/2020 9:16 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/

See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--


I vote fake. The description says aluminum, the sparks say steel and the
grinder says soft. Not sure if the fake is intentional or accidental, but
the story so far does not add up.

Hope this doesn't offend too much,

bob prohaska


In my capacity of regularly removing 'impenetrable' locks
with lost keys from bicycles, I scoff at the term 'cut proof'

Here's an example. There's a cute elegant little lock with
14mm tempered aluminum shackle and body, 'can't be cut with
disc grinder'. Yeah, so what? There are many methods for
many materials. If the thief with a battery disc grinder is
thwarted, the next guy will break it differently.


Modern abrasive disks are remarkably good. Add a decent battery
powered drive and it's probably the best attack off the shelf.

I have to admit the idea of a composite material has some merit.
A mix of something hard to resist sawing and shearing plus a
material that "loads up" abrasives to make grinding difficult
might be resistant to quick attack. I don't know of such a combo,
most metals hard enough to resist shearing won't load a wheel.
Those that will load a wheel are soft enough to saw or shear.

A resin-bonded SiC wheel is difficult to fend off directly. A
lock material (or structure) that causes rotary tools to bind
and grab is the best defense that comes to mind. I've broken
lots of abrasive cutting disks that way....

For the curious, there is a YouTube channel by "Lock Picking
Lawyer" where various gadgets, including bike locks, are tested.

bob prohaska




  #7  
Old July 25th 20, 09:09 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,965
Default Bicycle Security News

On Thursday, July 23, 2020 at 10:37:45 PM UTC+1, bob prohaska wrote:
AMuzi wrote:
On 7/22/2020 9:16 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/

See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--

I vote fake. The description says aluminum, the sparks say steel and the
grinder says soft. Not sure if the fake is intentional or accidental, but
the story so far does not add up.

Hope this doesn't offend too much,

bob prohaska


In my capacity of regularly removing 'impenetrable' locks
with lost keys from bicycles, I scoff at the term 'cut proof'

Here's an example. There's a cute elegant little lock with
14mm tempered aluminum shackle and body, 'can't be cut with
disc grinder'. Yeah, so what? There are many methods for
many materials. If the thief with a battery disc grinder is
thwarted, the next guy will break it differently.


Modern abrasive disks are remarkably good. Add a decent battery
powered drive and it's probably the best attack off the shelf.

I have to admit the idea of a composite material has some merit.
A mix of something hard to resist sawing and shearing plus a
material that "loads up" abrasives to make grinding difficult
might be resistant to quick attack. I don't know of such a combo,
most metals hard enough to resist shearing won't load a wheel.
Those that will load a wheel are soft enough to saw or shear.

A resin-bonded SiC wheel is difficult to fend off directly. A
lock material (or structure) that causes rotary tools to bind
and grab is the best defense that comes to mind. I've broken
lots of abrasive cutting disks that way....

For the curious, there is a YouTube channel by "Lock Picking
Lawyer" where various gadgets, including bike locks, are tested.

bob prohaska


Depressing. I go a different way. We don't have a lot of trucks where I live, and most vans have a lot of stuff in them, so there are very few vehicles to take a bike away. I therefore merely make my bike unrideable by uncoupling the steerer shaft from the stem so that the wheel flops here, there and everywhere and becomes a danger to the would-be thief. See http://thorncyclesforum.co.uk/index.php?topic=3930.0 for a description and some images down thread.

Andre Jute
No reason not to bring rationality to bear on cycling as on everything else
  #8  
Old July 25th 20, 06:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
bob prohaska
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 80
Default Bicycle Security News

Andre Jute wrote:
On Thursday, July 23, 2020 at 10:37:45 PM UTC+1, bob prohaska wrote:
AMuzi wrote:
On 7/22/2020 9:16 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/

See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--

I vote fake. The description says aluminum, the sparks say steel and the
grinder says soft. Not sure if the fake is intentional or accidental, but
the story so far does not add up.

Hope this doesn't offend too much,

bob prohaska


In my capacity of regularly removing 'impenetrable' locks
with lost keys from bicycles, I scoff at the term 'cut proof'

Here's an example. There's a cute elegant little lock with
14mm tempered aluminum shackle and body, 'can't be cut with
disc grinder'. Yeah, so what? There are many methods for
many materials. If the thief with a battery disc grinder is
thwarted, the next guy will break it differently.


Modern abrasive disks are remarkably good. Add a decent battery
powered drive and it's probably the best attack off the shelf.

I have to admit the idea of a composite material has some merit.
A mix of something hard to resist sawing and shearing plus a
material that "loads up" abrasives to make grinding difficult
might be resistant to quick attack. I don't know of such a combo,
most metals hard enough to resist shearing won't load a wheel.
Those that will load a wheel are soft enough to saw or shear.

A resin-bonded SiC wheel is difficult to fend off directly. A
lock material (or structure) that causes rotary tools to bind
and grab is the best defense that comes to mind. I've broken
lots of abrasive cutting disks that way....

For the curious, there is a YouTube channel by "Lock Picking
Lawyer" where various gadgets, including bike locks, are tested.

bob prohaska


Depressing. I go a different way. We don't have a lot of trucks where I live, and most vans have a lot of stuff in them, so there are very few vehicles to take a bike away.


I don't think that will ever be the case in the US. Bikes and cars
park within feet of each other except in very special circumstances.

I therefore merely make my bike unrideable


The n'Lock does have the advatage of visibility, but one hundred
Euros seems like an expensive method. Some Raleighs had a steering
lock built in, as do most motorcycles. My Breezer has a frame lock
that keeps the rear wheel from turning. All three are good enough
to prevent a quick ride-off.

A combination of fine hard steel wire to thwart shearing and some
sort of sticky polymer resin to promote binding and grabbing would
certainly make use of a grinder slower and more obvious. If the
polymer could be made to crosslink under friction so as to load the
wheel that would help considerably. Kevlar _might_ substitute for
steel.

As with fine jewelry, the best security requires supervision....
stealth helps too.

Thanks for reading,

bob prohaska

  #9  
Old August 1st 20, 12:37 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Bicycle Security News

On Saturday, July 25, 2020 at 10:46:18 AM UTC-7, bob prohaska wrote:
Andre Jute wrote:
On Thursday, July 23, 2020 at 10:37:45 PM UTC+1, bob prohaska wrote:
AMuzi wrote:
On 7/22/2020 9:16 PM, bob prohaska wrote:
John B. wrote:
On Wed, 22 Jul 2020 09:11:50 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/

See
https://bgr.com/2020/07/21/uncuttabl...cutting-tools/
for a demonstration of "cutting" the above material
--

I vote fake. The description says aluminum, the sparks say steel and the
grinder says soft. Not sure if the fake is intentional or accidental, but
the story so far does not add up.

Hope this doesn't offend too much,

bob prohaska


In my capacity of regularly removing 'impenetrable' locks
with lost keys from bicycles, I scoff at the term 'cut proof'

Here's an example. There's a cute elegant little lock with
14mm tempered aluminum shackle and body, 'can't be cut with
disc grinder'. Yeah, so what? There are many methods for
many materials. If the thief with a battery disc grinder is
thwarted, the next guy will break it differently.


Modern abrasive disks are remarkably good. Add a decent battery
powered drive and it's probably the best attack off the shelf.

I have to admit the idea of a composite material has some merit.
A mix of something hard to resist sawing and shearing plus a
material that "loads up" abrasives to make grinding difficult
might be resistant to quick attack. I don't know of such a combo,
most metals hard enough to resist shearing won't load a wheel.
Those that will load a wheel are soft enough to saw or shear.

A resin-bonded SiC wheel is difficult to fend off directly. A
lock material (or structure) that causes rotary tools to bind
and grab is the best defense that comes to mind. I've broken
lots of abrasive cutting disks that way....

For the curious, there is a YouTube channel by "Lock Picking
Lawyer" where various gadgets, including bike locks, are tested.

bob prohaska


Depressing. I go a different way. We don't have a lot of trucks where I live, and most vans have a lot of stuff in them, so there are very few vehicles to take a bike away.


I don't think that will ever be the case in the US. Bikes and cars
park within feet of each other except in very special circumstances.

I therefore merely make my bike unrideable


The n'Lock does have the advatage of visibility, but one hundred
Euros seems like an expensive method. Some Raleighs had a steering
lock built in, as do most motorcycles. My Breezer has a frame lock
that keeps the rear wheel from turning. All three are good enough
to prevent a quick ride-off.

A combination of fine hard steel wire to thwart shearing and some
sort of sticky polymer resin to promote binding and grabbing would
certainly make use of a grinder slower and more obvious. If the
polymer could be made to crosslink under friction so as to load the
wheel that would help considerably. Kevlar _might_ substitute for
steel.

As with fine jewelry, the best security requires supervision....
stealth helps too.

Thanks for reading,

bob prohaska


I have a small Master combination lock designed for bikes. Because a pair of wirecutters would free it you can't get too far away from your bike for very long but it is effective. http://www.1st-in-padlocks.com/maste...26_95_127.html
  #10  
Old August 1st 20, 08:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AK[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 206
Default Bicycle Security News

On Wednesday, July 22, 2020 at 9:12:01 AM UTC-5, AMuzi wrote:
or maybe fake news

https://cyclingindustry.news/scienti...bike-security/
--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


I wonder if a battery angle grinder could cut it?

Andy
 




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