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Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers fromDonegal you promised to prove?



 
 
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  #21  
Old August 1st 20, 06:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,969
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers fromDonegal you promised to prove?

So, Franki-boy, why didn't you offer the relevant references on day one? We might suspect that you're trolling by withholding relevant references in the hope of making a little storm in a passport into a mountain. That's genuinely scummy, but no more slimy than we expect from you on a daily basis.

In any event, I want to see the references on which your sources relied to prove that Donegal peasants in particular went all the way to Scotland. Post them at your earliest convenience. I bet, when I have these references, I'll discover that they're contradicted by more modern research, which concludes the same as I did: Donegallers had no reason to go any further than into the Plantation to find seasonal work -- and pick up Scottish fiddling methods.

Who paid to transport them all the way from Donegal to Scotland and back again? You make so little sense, it comes as no surprise to discover that your references, when at long last we see them, make as little sense as you do..

Andre Jute
Looking forward to hearing from you, Franki-boy

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 5:37:30 PM UTC+1, Frank Krygowski wrote:

From p.69, _Celtic Music, A Complete Guide_, J.S. Sawyers:

"The style of Donegal fiddling, for example, is marked by strong bowing
and double stopping and is often compared to Cape Breton fiddling.
Because of the historical connection with Scotland - seasonal migrations
were common to southeastern Scotland - there is also a strong Scots
influence such as single-stroke bowing, a strong staccato that indicates
the influence of the bagpipe, and an overall forceful and driving attack."

About five minutes of browsing yields, from p. 120, _The Northern
Fiddler_, A. Feldman & E. O'Doherty:

"At the end of the nineteenth century, which was the period in which
most of the fiddlers we met were born, South-west Donegal was a region
of severe poverty. ... It was virtually a moneyless society, dependent
on a good drop of potatoes, the presence of offshore herring, and the
demand for migratory labour in Scotland for its economic continuity."

I could find more citations, but they won't affect the trolling.

--
- Frank Krygowski

Ads
  #22  
Old August 1st 20, 07:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
SMS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,109
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers fromDonegal you promised to prove?

On 7/31/2020 8:38 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

snip

Last October, I bought a new used phone (Google Pixel 1).


I read about the Pixel 1 in my history book.

Of course,
it needed a suitable ring tone. I soon discovered that on the
original Pixel 1, the maximum ringer volume was barely sufficient to
be heard over the road noise, and totally lost if the car radio was
playing.


Can you not connect the phone to your radio via Bluetooth? Have you not
replaced that old stock radio yet? Besides Bluetooth you can get HD Radio.
  #23  
Old August 1st 20, 08:54 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,372
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers from Donegal you promised to prove?

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 11:54:47 -0700, sms
wrote:

On 7/31/2020 8:38 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

snip

Last October, I bought a new used phone (Google Pixel 1).


I read about the Pixel 1 in my history book.


Book? Are those still being printed? I thought everything these days
was online, streaming, eBooks, or Zoom lectures.

Hint: It runs Android 10. It cost me $75 including tacks and
shipping on eBay. Verizon pulled the plug on my LG VX-8300 dumb phone
without warning, and wouldn't activate any of my other ancient phones.
So I bought the first phone that looked reasonable. AccuBattery Pro
says that the battery is half dead, which was initially a problem
until I turned off polling for email every few minutes. With polling
and digital data turned off, it runs about 24 hr with light use.
Unfortunately, the local LTE site in Ben Lomond is broken. It works
just fine with any other LTE site, but not the one at the BL fire
department. When I complain to Page Plus, they say call Verizon. When
I complain to Verizon, they say I'm not their customer, and politely
ask me not to bother them. I may need to switch to T-Mobile in order
to get service in downtown BL. Other than that, the Pixel 1 has been
just fine for the previous 10 months. I also bought one for my
neighbor that has a better battery.

I'll shortly be looking into buying a Lenovo Motorola Moto G Power
phone as a present to myself for closing the office and half-way
retiring. The phone seems ok, but I'm not so thrilled about Lenovo
service and support.
https://www.motorola.com/us/smartphones-moto-g-power/p

Of course,
it needed a suitable ring tone. I soon discovered that on the
original Pixel 1, the maximum ringer volume was barely sufficient to
be heard over the road noise, and totally lost if the car radio was
playing.


Can you not connect the phone to your radio via Bluetooth? Have you not
replaced that old stock radio yet? Besides Bluetooth you can get HD Radio.


Bluetooth was still on the drawing board when my 2001 Subaru Forester
was manufactured. There's no easy way to add external audio. I've
though of doing that, but found it easier to buy a used EcoCarbon
Bluetooth speaker with built in speakerphone.
https://ecoxgear.com/shop/ecocarbon/
When the phone rings, the streaming (stored) music from my Pixel 1
phone stops, and is replaced by some noises that are suppose to
imitate a phone ringing. So far, it's been acceptable. The audio
quality seems to be better from the Subaru speakers. The only problem
so far is remembering to turn on the BT speakers and finding the phone
pickup button in the dark while not watching where I'm driving.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  #24  
Old August 1st 20, 09:36 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers fromDonegal you promised to prove?

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 8:06:05 AM UTC-7, Andre Jute wrote:
Read the headline, Dingleberry. Frank-boy is claiming seasonal workers from *Donegal*, specifically. I've already put him down for generic handwaving. And here you are, generically handwaving about seasonal Irish workers, who were in the time and place, very unlikely ever to return to Ireland, never mind return annually. How would they have saved the passage on what harvesting paid? You're an idiot non pareil, Peter Howard, aka news18. How would the starving families in the Gap of Dunlop which I was talking about the first time you tried your silly handwaving about seasonal workers have come by the money for passage even to England? Show us "seasonal workers" leaving from *and returning to* Donegal, and we'll take you seriously. Until you can do that, leave economic history to people with brains.

You're a stupid waste of oxygen.

Andre Jute
I wonder what made this kindergarten wannabe debater think he could be a writer.

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 4:05:41 AM UTC+1, news18 wrote:
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 17:19:47 -0700, Andre Jute, waffling from his
delusions, wrote:

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 9:19:59 PM UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann wrote:


Good luck. If you have problems, just ask one of the seasonal workers
for help. They might not know much about keyboard cleaning, but the
probably know more than the local bicycle blacksmith.


Sadly, in the times Frank & I are talking about, it might have been
quills only.

Poor Franki-boy got misled by that useful idiot (to me, not to
Franki-boy, heh-heh!), news18, known here as the thief Peter Howard, who
in falling over himself to contradict me reported absolutely erroneously
about the peasants I was talking about that they went to England as
seasonal labourers, and I couldn't be bothered to correct the wretched
little man.


" As far back as the 14th century, itinerant Irish migrants were known to
travel throughout England and Scotland in search of employment. This
became more prevalent by the end of the 18th century when groups such as
the “spalpeens” and “tattie howkers”, large travelling gangs of Irish
men, women and children, would help bring in the annual harvest. "

https://theconversation.com/who-pick...nd-veg-before-
migrant-workers-63279

"Irish immigration to Britain - emigration from Ireland to England,
Scotland or Wales - was nothing new even before the mass exodus of the
Famine years (1845-1849). Up to the time of that crisis, Britain had
always been the principal destination of Irish migrants, whether their
movement was temporary eg. for seasonal work, or permanent. "

https://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit....o-Britain.html

Oh dear, so easy to find and much more of it.

See Tommy, living there doesn't give you magical insight into the history
of a location.

Of course, AJ is just really not even seasonal labour as he had to move
from country to country for some reason and still doesn't understand,
that 'Northern Ireland' is a recent British political solution that next
year will 'celebrate' 100 years of existence.


You keep calling him Peter Howard. While I don't remember that person specifically in relation to bicycles I do remember that name leaving a very bad taste or smell.news18 claims to be an Aussie so I can't connect the two.
  #25  
Old August 1st 20, 09:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default Lol, AJ eats his shoe, Was Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, whereare those seasonal workers from Donegal you promised to prove?

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 9:37:30 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 7/31/2020 11:05 PM, news18 wrote:
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 17:19:47 -0700, Andre Jute, waffling from his
delusions, wrote:

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 9:19:59 PM UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann wrote:


Good luck. If you have problems, just ask one of the seasonal workers
for help. They might not know much about keyboard cleaning, but the
probably know more than the local bicycle blacksmith.


Sadly, in the times Frank & I are talking about, it might have been
quills only.

Poor Franki-boy got misled by that useful idiot (to me, not to
Franki-boy, heh-heh!), news18, known here as the thief Peter Howard, who
in falling over himself to contradict me reported absolutely erroneously
about the peasants I was talking about that they went to England as
seasonal labourers, and I couldn't be bothered to correct the wretched
little man.


" As far back as the 14th century, itinerant Irish migrants were known to
travel throughout England and Scotland in search of employment. This
became more prevalent by the end of the 18th century when groups such as
the “spalpeens” and “tattie howkers”, large travelling gangs of Irish
men, women and children, would help bring in the annual harvest. "

https://theconversation.com/who-pick...nd-veg-before-
migrant-workers-63279

"Irish immigration to Britain - emigration from Ireland to England,
Scotland or Wales - was nothing new even before the mass exodus of the
Famine years (1845-1849). Up to the time of that crisis, Britain had
always been the principal destination of Irish migrants, whether their
movement was temporary eg. for seasonal work, or permanent. "

https://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit....o-Britain.html

Oh dear, so easy to find and much more of it.

Indeed. This took me roughly 30 seconds to find once I pulled the book
from my shelf. From p.69, _Celtic Music, A Complete Guide_, J.S. Sawyers:

"The style of Donegal fiddling, for example, is marked by strong bowing
and double stopping and is often compared to Cape Breton fiddling.
Because of the historical connection with Scotland - seasonal migrations
were common to southeastern Scotland - there is also a strong Scots
influence such as single-stroke bowing, a strong staccato that indicates
the influence of the bagpipe, and an overall forceful and driving attack."

About five minutes of browsing yields, from p. 120, _The Northern
Fiddler_, A. Feldman & E. O'Doherty:

"At the end of the nineteenth century, which was the period in which
most of the fiddlers we met were born, South-west Donegal was a region
of severe poverty. ... It was virtually a moneyless society, dependent
on a good drop of potatoes, the presence of offshore herring, and the
demand for migratory labour in Scotland for its economic continuity."

I could find more citations, but they won't affect the trolling.

--
- Frank Krygowski


You really have to be pretty stupid to not know why seasonal migrations would occur between Scotland and Southern Ireland which isn't even in the same country as Donegal.
  #26  
Old August 1st 20, 10:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Andre Jute[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,969
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers fromDonegal you promised to prove?

On Saturday, August 1, 2020 at 1:27:27 AM UTC+1, jbeattie wrote:
On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 4:12:15 PM UTC-7, Jeff Liebermann wrote:
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 20:56:13 -0000 (UTC), Duane
wrote:

Jeff Liebermann wrote:
Please do it again. Wikipedia seems to think Donegal is a town:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donegal_(town)
http://www.donegaltown.ie


Not to get involved too much except out of boredom, Donegal is a county,
isn’t it?


The secret to long life is to never resist temptation. You're likely
to live a long life, along with many other bicyclists who post such
comments.

Yes, Donegal is a county. However, it's also:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donegal
a bay, a town, a castle, an airport, an Irish parliamentary
constituency, various communities in Canada and Pennsylvania, two
gunships, a ferry boat, a brand of wool carpet, and a dairy company.
Which of these are responsible for seasonal workers is a subject of
which I know nothing. However, it doesn't really matter because the
objective of my comments was to inspire Andre Jute to repeat his
performance before the keyboard so that I have a defensible excuse for
demonstrating my expertise in the fine art of keyboard cleansing.

Drivel: Did you know he has a chandelier named in his honor?
https://www.google.com/search?q=regina+andrew+jute&hl=en&tbm=isch


He is also the author of the "scratch and sniff" runaway best seller: https://tinyurl.com/y6qjfmdb

-- Jay Beattie.


I heard Jeffrey Epstein was a big donor to the Donkey Party. -- AJ
  #27  
Old August 1st 20, 11:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 988
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers fromDonegal you promised to prove?

On Sat, 01 Aug 2020 11:54:47 -0700, sms wrote:

On 7/31/2020 8:38 PM, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

snip

Last October, I bought a new used phone (Google Pixel 1).


I read about the Pixel 1 in my history book.

Of course,
it needed a suitable ring tone. I soon discovered that on the original
Pixel 1, the maximum ringer volume was barely sufficient to be heard
over the road noise, and totally lost if the car radio was playing.


Can you not connect the phone to your radio via Bluetooth? Have you not
replaced that old stock radio yet? Besides Bluetooth you can get HD
Radio.


Err, but can you get HD radio signals to make it worth while. it seems to
me that broadcast audio quality has not improved in decades.

  #28  
Old August 1st 20, 11:57 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,127
Default Lol, AJ eats his shoe, Was Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers from Donegal you promised to prove?

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 12:37:21 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 7/31/2020 11:05 PM, news18 wrote:
On Fri, 31 Jul 2020 17:19:47 -0700, Andre Jute, waffling from his
delusions, wrote:

On Friday, July 31, 2020 at 9:19:59 PM UTC+1, Jeff Liebermann wrote:


Good luck. If you have problems, just ask one of the seasonal workers
for help. They might not know much about keyboard cleaning, but the
probably know more than the local bicycle blacksmith.


Sadly, in the times Frank & I are talking about, it might have been
quills only.

Poor Franki-boy got misled by that useful idiot (to me, not to
Franki-boy, heh-heh!), news18, known here as the thief Peter Howard, who
in falling over himself to contradict me reported absolutely erroneously
about the peasants I was talking about that they went to England as
seasonal labourers, and I couldn't be bothered to correct the wretched
little man.


" As far back as the 14th century, itinerant Irish migrants were known to
travel throughout England and Scotland in search of employment. This
became more prevalent by the end of the 18th century when groups such as
the spalpeens and tattie howkers, large travelling gangs of Irish
men, women and children, would help bring in the annual harvest. "

https://theconversation.com/who-pick...nd-veg-before-
migrant-workers-63279

"Irish immigration to Britain - emigration from Ireland to England,
Scotland or Wales - was nothing new even before the mass exodus of the
Famine years (1845-1849). Up to the time of that crisis, Britain had
always been the principal destination of Irish migrants, whether their
movement was temporary eg. for seasonal work, or permanent. "

https://www.irish-genealogy-toolkit....o-Britain.html

Oh dear, so easy to find and much more of it.

Indeed. This took me roughly 30 seconds to find once I pulled the book
from my shelf. From p.69, _Celtic Music, A Complete Guide_, J.S. Sawyers:

"The style of Donegal fiddling, for example, is marked by strong bowing
and double stopping and is often compared to Cape Breton fiddling.
Because of the historical connection with Scotland - seasonal migrations
were common to southeastern Scotland - there is also a strong Scots
influence such as single-stroke bowing, a strong staccato that indicates
the influence of the bagpipe, and an overall forceful and driving attack."

About five minutes of browsing yields, from p. 120, _The Northern
Fiddler_, A. Feldman & E. O'Doherty:

"At the end of the nineteenth century, which was the period in which
most of the fiddlers we met were born, South-west Donegal was a region
of severe poverty. ... It was virtually a moneyless society, dependent
on a good drop of potatoes, the presence of offshore herring, and the
demand for migratory labour in Scotland for its economic continuity."

I could find more citations, but they won't affect the trolling.


Frank, you just have to stop this foolishness. Posting references to
prove your statements are correct. It isn't consider a fair practice.
Knowing what you are talking about?

Why it is positively un-american, isn't it? It must be, based on your
current President' tweets.
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #29  
Old August 2nd 20, 12:05 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
news18
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 988
Default OT Lol, AJ eats his shoe,

On Sat, 01 Aug 2020 12:37:21 -0400, Frank Krygowski wrote:



I could find more citations, but they won't affect the trolling.


No, it will not. Tweedledee & Tweedledum are both desperate for attention.
I haven't mentioned that I knew it happened from family history as
multiple lines came from Ireland.

On more relevant bicycle information, two of my lines rode bicycles
together to take part in the ballot for the opening up of Leeton, NSW,
Australia and the information didn't come out until a chance comment was
passed years later.

  #30  
Old August 2nd 20, 02:56 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Jeff Liebermann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,372
Default Hey, Franki-boy Krygowski, where are those seasonal workers from Donegal you promised to prove?

On Sat, 1 Aug 2020 22:53:33 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

Err, but can you get HD radio signals to make it worth while. it seems to
me that broadcast audio quality has not improved in decades.


I live in the Santa Cruz mountains of Californai and listen mostly to
classical music in the car. There are 3 classical stations within
range for regular FM broadcasting, and 2 more on HD Radio
sub-channels. Because of the mountains causing reflections and
presenting obstructions, reception is marginal on regular FM, and
dismal on the HD Radio sub-channels. In other words, it's not worth
the effort listening to OTA (over the air) music in my area. I
wouldn't mind streaming Pandora in the car, but I don't want to pay
for the bandwidth, or switch phone vendor to T-Mobile to get free
audio streaming as part of the plan:
https://www.t-mobile.com/support/plans-features/unlimited-music-streaming-with-music-freedom
For now, I have a 128GB flash drive that is crammed full of digitized
music that I plug into my Pixel 1 phone with a USB-OTG cable. While a
bit clumsy, the lack of commercial advertising and talking heads makes
this scheme quite attractive to me.


--
Jeff Liebermann
150 Felker St #D
http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
 




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