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drill/tap in frames



 
 
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  #101  
Old July 13th 18, 04:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,271
Default drill/tap in frames

On 7/12/2018 9:37 PM, AMuzi wrote:

One might argue that we make good hardware, software, armament and kit.
One might also argue that arms sales are more political than economic so
quality, price or performance may not even be factors when compared to
arm-bending 'deals one cannot refuse' as it were.

How political can arms sales possibly be?

https://sputniknews.com/us/201807081...ell-old-tanks/

Being Canadian, they wouldn't want their surplus tanks used to hurt
people or anything like that:


They should follow Bob Hope's lead. Few people know it, but Hope made a
killing buying and selling obsolete military equipment after WW2. He had
the connections due to his volunteer work, and he was able to get lots
of tanks, cannons, etc. for next to nothing.

He turned them around, selling them profitably to VFW halls, little
towns, etc. at prices that seemed great. They were bought for the war
memorials that still stand today.

Hope even used his TV shows and stage performances to do subliminal
advertising. He was a pioneer at that. At every show, he promoted his
business by singing "Tanks for the memories." It worked.


--
- Frank Krygowski
Ads
  #102  
Old July 13th 18, 06:15 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 87
Default drill/tap in frames

On Thu, 12 Jul 2018 20:37:07 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 7/12/2018 5:43 PM, John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 12 Jul 2018 17:20:56 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 7/12/2018 12:50 PM, AMuzi wrote:
Sometimes, the crowd looks to The Left while
visionaries look Right:

https://www.zerohedge.com/sites/defa...20nato%204.jpg

Two proud parents waited for the middle school marching band to pass by
during the town parade. Soon they saw all the children concentrating
hard, blaring on their clarinets and trumpets, and marching left, right,
left, right...

Except for their own little boy, who was marching right, left, right, left.

"Look, dear!" said the proud mother. "Everyone's out of step except our
little Donnie!"


One always wonders whether there will be a secondary effect of some of
these actions.

The U.S. is the largest exporter of arms in the world with $10 billion
of exports last year. How much of the $10 B is procured by Nato?

One might also not want to ignore the fact that NATO IS a neuclar
power with 200 odd neuclar bombs stored in various places in Europe.



One might argue that we make good hardware, software,
armament and kit. One might also argue that arms sales are
more political than economic so quality, price or
performance may not even be factors when compared to
arm-bending 'deals one cannot refuse' as it were.

This is undoubtedly correct but if 10 billion is entering the economic
system there is some justification for saying "what difference does it
make where it comes from.... it is 10 billion!

How political can arms sales possibly be?

https://sputniknews.com/us/201807081...ell-old-tanks/

My experience has been that arms deals are generally either political
or corrupt, or both.

Some years ago we were quietly asked by the Indonesian A.F. if we
could supply some bits and pieces for Huey helicopters. As soon as we
placed the first order we were informed that the parts were
unavailable (to us).

Being Canadian, they wouldn't want their surplus tanks used
to hurt people or anything like that:

the list of potential buyers was rather short due to
Canada's policy not to sell weapons to "problematic countries."

https://globalnews.ca/news/4318852/c...orces-fizzles/

At least in the two wheeler world I really don't care about
your personal morals once your charge card runs and your
bike leaves my premises.

--

Cheers,

John B.
  #103  
Old July 13th 18, 06:30 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 87
Default drill/tap in frames

On Fri, 13 Jul 2018 00:10:02 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

James wrote:

Then you should definitely not just drill
and tap the frame tube itself.

Why not?


The material is too thin.


Is it more thick at the bottom of the bottom
bracket shell and at the bottom-mid section of
the down tube where I have seen this numerous
times, and also the chainguard stays to the
chainguard intersection?


A bottom bracket is usually specified as 7 - 8 mm thick.
--

Cheers,

John B.
  #104  
Old July 13th 18, 06:42 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 87
Default drill/tap in frames

On Thu, 12 Jul 2018 23:19:23 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 7/12/2018 9:37 PM, AMuzi wrote:

One might argue that we make good hardware, software, armament and kit.
One might also argue that arms sales are more political than economic so
quality, price or performance may not even be factors when compared to
arm-bending 'deals one cannot refuse' as it were.

How political can arms sales possibly be?

https://sputniknews.com/us/201807081...ell-old-tanks/

Being Canadian, they wouldn't want their surplus tanks used to hurt
people or anything like that:


They should follow Bob Hope's lead. Few people know it, but Hope made a
killing buying and selling obsolete military equipment after WW2. He had
the connections due to his volunteer work, and he was able to get lots
of tanks, cannons, etc. for next to nothing.

He turned them around, selling them profitably to VFW halls, little
towns, etc. at prices that seemed great. They were bought for the war
memorials that still stand today.


And doing a good thing :-) In the 1945 period war surplus had almost
literally no value at all. If one could turn it into money it was
probably a patriotic act :-)

Hope even used his TV shows and stage performances to do subliminal
advertising. He was a pioneer at that. At every show, he promoted his
business by singing "Tanks for the memories." It worked.


--

Cheers,

John B.
  #105  
Old July 13th 18, 11:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,021
Default drill/tap in frames

John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is it more thick at the bottom of the bottom
bracket shell and at the bottom-mid section
of the down tube where I have seen this
numerous times, and also the chainguard
stays to the chainguard intersection?


A bottom bracket is usually specified as 7 -
8 mm thick.


And the mid-bottom part of the down tube?
The screws are interchangeable in size
and length.

Yesterday BTW I saw a second bike with the
exact same configuration. The bracket is bent
so it is round along the tube surface, but what
holds it in its place seems to be a single M5
screw with a flat PZ2 head.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #106  
Old July 13th 18, 01:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 87
Default drill/tap in frames

On Fri, 13 Jul 2018 12:18:26 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

John B. Slocomb wrote:

Is it more thick at the bottom of the bottom
bracket shell and at the bottom-mid section
of the down tube where I have seen this
numerous times, and also the chainguard
stays to the chainguard intersection?


A bottom bracket is usually specified as 7 -
8 mm thick.


And the mid-bottom part of the down tube?
The screws are interchangeable in size
and length.


Well that depends. Probably on the cost and class of the bike. The
down tube is pretty thin on most better class road bikes. Say Perhaps
..6 - .7 mm in wall thickness. Depending on whether it is butted, non
butted, etc,

Yesterday BTW I saw a second bike with the
exact same configuration. The bracket is bent
so it is round along the tube surface, but what
holds it in its place seems to be a single M5
screw with a flat PZ2 head.


Given that all the pedaling torque passes through the bottom bracket
I'd doubt if a new bike would use a single screw to hold the BB onto
the frame tubes.

--

Cheers,

John B.
  #107  
Old July 13th 18, 01:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 166
Default drill/tap in frames

John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Thu, 12 Jul 2018 23:19:23 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 7/12/2018 9:37 PM, AMuzi wrote:

One might argue that we make good hardware, software, armament and kit.
One might also argue that arms sales are more political than economic so
quality, price or performance may not even be factors when compared to
arm-bending 'deals one cannot refuse' as it were.

How political can arms sales possibly be?

https://sputniknews.com/us/201807081...ell-old-tanks/

Being Canadian, they wouldn't want their surplus tanks used to hurt
people or anything like that:


They should follow Bob Hope's lead. Few people know it, but Hope made a
killing buying and selling obsolete military equipment after WW2. He had
the connections due to his volunteer work, and he was able to get lots
of tanks, cannons, etc. for next to nothing.

He turned them around, selling them profitably to VFW halls, little
towns, etc. at prices that seemed great. They were bought for the war
memorials that still stand today.


And doing a good thing :-) In the 1945 period war surplus had almost
literally no value at all. If one could turn it into money it was
probably a patriotic act :-)

Hope even used his TV shows and stage performances to do subliminal
advertising. He was a pioneer at that. At every show, he promoted his
business by singing "Tanks for the memories." It worked.


--

Cheers,

John B.


John, I suspect Frank's post was a very long, subtle joke.

  #108  
Old July 13th 18, 01:49 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ralph Barone[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 166
Default drill/tap in frames

John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 13 Jul 2018 00:10:02 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

James wrote:

Then you should definitely not just drill
and tap the frame tube itself.

Why not?

The material is too thin.


Is it more thick at the bottom of the bottom
bracket shell and at the bottom-mid section of
the down tube where I have seen this numerous
times, and also the chainguard stays to the
chainguard intersection?


A bottom bracket is usually specified as 7 - 8 mm thick.
--

Cheers,

John B.


Maybe 3-4 mm. Are you quoting the difference between the OD and ID, or the
wall thickness?

  #109  
Old July 13th 18, 03:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Emanuel Berg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,021
Default drill/tap in frames

John B. Slocomb wrote:

And the mid-bottom part of the down tube?
The screws are interchangeable in size
and length.


Well that depends. Probably on the cost and
class of the bike. The down tube is pretty
thin on most better class road bikes.
Say Perhaps .6 - .7 mm in wall thickness.
Depending on whether it is butted, non
butted, etc,


These are not road bikes but ordinary standard
steel frames for commuting, shopping, and
everyday transport, say from the 80s.

Yesterday BTW I saw a second bike with the
exact same configuration. The bracket is
bent so it is round along the tube surface,
but what holds it in its place seems to be
a single M5 screw with a flat PZ2 head.


Given that all the pedaling torque passes
through the bottom bracket I'd doubt if a new
bike would use a single screw to hold the BB
onto the frame tubes.


What is held are two stays that then hold
the chainguard.

--
underground experts united
http://user.it.uu.se/~embe8573
  #110  
Old July 13th 18, 11:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B. Slocomb
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 87
Default drill/tap in frames

On Fri, 13 Jul 2018 12:49:33 +0000 (UTC), Ralph Barone
wrote:

John B. Slocomb wrote:
On Fri, 13 Jul 2018 00:10:02 +0200, Emanuel Berg
wrote:

James wrote:

Then you should definitely not just drill
and tap the frame tube itself.

Why not?

The material is too thin.

Is it more thick at the bottom of the bottom
bracket shell and at the bottom-mid section of
the down tube where I have seen this numerous
times, and also the chainguard stays to the
chainguard intersection?


A bottom bracket is usually specified as 7 - 8 mm thick.
--

Cheers,

John B.


Maybe 3-4 mm. Are you quoting the difference between the OD and ID, or the
wall thickness?


I just looked at their catalog which red, for example:
"LB100R - For 22.2mm Chainstays. 60.30x62.30x7\ufffd.
No guides or cut-outs".
or
"LB109R - With Oval 30x17mm. Chainstays.
Angles 60x64x7.30\ufffd. No guides or cut-outs."

Given that the first two numbers were obviously length and breadth
assumed the last was thickness. Not so?

--

Cheers,

John B.
 




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