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Stronger rubber cement?



 
 
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  #231  
Old January 19th 17, 09:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-18 17:36, Phil Lee wrote:
Joerg considered Mon, 16 Jan 2017
10:01:41 -0800 the perfect time to write:

On 2017-01-05 08:31, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/5/2017 9:59 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-05 07:34, wrote:
On Wednesday, January 4, 2017 at 8:47:35 PM UTC-8, Phil
Lee wrote:
Joerg considered Wed, 04 Jan
2017
07:38:10 -0800 the perfect time to write:

On 2017-01-04 01:19, Tosspot wrote:
On 04/01/17 01:04, Joerg wrote:
Gentlemen,

Is there something stronger than the usual rubber
cement in
the patch kits? Ideally something that won't dry out
so fast
or where multiple cheap small tubes are available.

The reason is that I sometimes have larger holes from
side
wall blow-outs. Not inch-long gashes but one or two
tenths of
an inch long. The tubes I use are super thick and,
therefore,
expensive. $15-20 each and that's not something to be
thrown
out lightly. Instead of the li'l REMA patches I need
to use
thicker rubber from an older sacrified tube but this
has to
be vulcanized/cemented really well.

UK, but must be available all over

http://www.tyre-equipment.co.uk/acat...r-Patches.html






Go up to 180mmx95mm and are less than a UKP per patch.


Thanks! Time for a trip to the autoparts store since
there is

http://www.vipal-usa.com/repair_line_e.html

Looks like a Brazilian company.


The 30mm patches are 13 squids per 100! Surely, surely
even
Joerg can't get through that amount that fast!


I hardly get flats but when I do they are hardcore.
Typically
caused by those notorious #%&^!! flimsy side walls of
bicycle
tires. Which is also why I am always on the lookout for
tires
with better side walls. For the MTB I found that Asian
ones do
better in that domain but haven't found any yet for the
road
bike. Will try CST, their Conquistare tires look
promising but I
could not find reviews.

Heavier tires are generally better and finally those
appeared for
29". For 700c it's still slim pickens.

You do know that 29" ARE 700c, both using a bead seat
diameter of
622mm? It's just that one description is used for MTB and
the other
for road use.

I have been told that many times. But my CX bike feels
absolutely
NOTHING like the 29er did. On that the wheels felt massive
and heavy.
On the CX bike they are nothing of the sort.


Phil should try to mount a 29" Intense Trail Taker tire or
similar on a 700c road bike. Then it would quickly sink in
why this will never work :-)


Joerg, don't be ridiculous. Phil Lee was correct.


Tires formally labeled as 29" are simply not available in 25mm. At least
AFAICT.

I know you struggle with the real world, and complex mathematical
concepts like wheel diameters, but surely even YOU can add 2x 25mm to
622mm, and conclude that the result is less than 29"!
Just in case, 672mm = 26.46, or in round figures, 26 1/2", so it's
hardly surprising that it is not mislabeled as 29"!

A 559mm 26x2.3 tire will mount on the rim but can't possibly fit inside
the frame or fork of a Bridgestone CB1. So what? A perfectly common
700-35C touring tire won't clear in your road bike either.

That unsuitably wide tires exist for any given rim diameter in any given
frame doesn't make them different ISO sizes. There are a spectrum of
widths for almost every ISO format, choice is good!


Well, there aren't skinny 29" tires.

The thing you need for compatibility is BEAD SEAT DIAMETER, which is
622mm for both the so-called 29" (which isn't really 29" except in
2.25" width, and even then only roughly), and so-called 700C (which
again, isn't really 700mm in diameter in anything other than 39mm
width either). The move from using overall diameter of a mounted and
inflated tyre to the use of bead seat diameters, as approved by ISO
and ETRTO is because it is only by using the bead seat diameter that
you can tell which tyre fits which rim.
And any 29", 700C, xx-622 will fit your rims, whatever width it may
be. Of course, it may not be the ideal width for the rim, or too wide
for the frame or forks, but it WILL mount on the rim.

GET IT?


The thing you need is the tire to _fit_ _through_ the chain stay. _No_
29" tire does on my road bike.

Get it now?


I can only hope that you never have to deal with the complexities of
the various 26" formats!

p.s. A 700-18 ultralight tire would fit your road bike rim as well. For
you, I'd suggest a wider tire.


Yes, I had very narrow tires before and found that 25mm is better for
where I now ride. 28mm would theoretically fit but only when the rear is
very well trued which does not hold for long on my routes. I am also not
very talented for trueing a wheel.


Maybe that (along with your notable level of machinery abuse) is the
real reason you insist that only disk brakes are worth using.


They are vastly superior to rim brakes in rain, mud, sleet et cetera.
Any MTB rider worth their salt knows this.

Oh, they have a "minor" additional advantage: They do not eat rims.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
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  #232  
Old January 19th 17, 09:25 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,447
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/19/2017 2:04 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 12:11, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/18/2017 11:33 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 09:18, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 7:36:44 AM UTC-8, Joerg
wrote:
On 2017-01-17 15:26, DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH wrote:
analog,

I will not explain tire mounting again. Retard at your
own speed


I have explained to you that these are _flat_ rims.
Hard to
understand?

The Argent rim is just a Mod E2. Right?


Mine are Mavic Module “3” Argent “D”. Almost flat
inside.


http://equusbicycle.com/bike/mavic/images/11and12.jpg
Pretty
standard rim of the era. Get VAR lever. It lifts the bead
over the
rim. Your problems will be solved. Getting another tire
or rim will
also solve your problems. Most people will not wrestle
with a tire
for a half-an-hour, at least not more than once.


I have broken many high quality levers on those and bike
shop owners have confirmed that issue. When they say "Good
luck getting them on" you know what you are up to.

The thick tubes I have do not exactly help in keeping the
bead towards the center but I made myself Delrin pieces to
do that. The relief that this provides is very limited
though, as evidenced by the fact that even with thin tubes
Gatorskins are really hard to mount onto these rims.

Fact is, the Vredestein tires always went on with ease and
the Gatorskin tires do not. Huge difference. However, the
Vredesteins had too many flats. So, I am looking for a tire
that is very puncture-resistant, has sturdy side walls _and_
is easy to mount. Eventually I will find one and then buy a
stack of them. Just like I did for the MTB where I found
three brands that work well.


That's a known deficient design with hardly any drop
between the bead
seats and the center well. Not only those Mavic, but Trek
copied it for
some all-time-lousy rims under their Bontrager brand. Very
hard to
mount/remove tires; Joerg is not making that up.


The weird phenomenon is that in the olden days all tires fit
fine. All of them. I put north of 50k miles on that bike
just in the 80's and used up rear tires as if they were
popcorn. All kinds of brands but mostly Vredestein. The
beads went on with ease, in minutes. Now some tires seem to
be subpar in bead diameter tolerance. For example,
Gatorskins take over an hour to wrestle them on (with breaks
because the thumbs hurt so much). Once they have been on
there for a while it becomes easier to take them off and put
them back on. How much easier depends on the time they've
been on the rim, not how many times they were mounted or how
many miles were ridden. That seems to indicate that the
beads stretch while on there.

Sometimes things really were better in the good old days. I
realized that again just now when re-working a wine fridge.
The design and the workmanship was, in part, rather messed
up. That somehow rarely happened in the 50's (we have a
Bosch fridge from 1956, still running great).


The good old days were sometimes but mostly not.

Anyone who wrestled tires to seat on undersized steel rims
all day long [1] will have a different view from yours. That
process involves tedium, muscle and the occasional chunks of
rubber in the eye after a loud bang. Sharp edges, swarf and
slag from seam welds were very common when steel rims were
the norm, in all brands. Even on good rims, oversized
Pirelli and Carideng cotton tires blew off frequently. Then
French bikes with spokes sticking through the nipples. I
could go on.

[1] I'm thinking here of several batches of off-spec
Schwinn EA1 chromed rims.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #233  
Old January 19th 17, 09:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-18 12:53, wrote:
On Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 7:51:06 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-17 20:21, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 17 Jan 2017 07:43:37 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-01-16 18:04, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 16 Jan 2017 17:11:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-01-16 16:50, John B. wrote:
On Mon, 16 Jan 2017 10:16:51 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

On 2017-01-05 02:04, Tosspot wrote:
On 04/01/17 20:05, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-03 17:04, Joerg wrote:
Gentlemen,

Is there something stronger than the usual rubber
cement in the patch kits? Ideally something that
won't dry out so fast or where multiple cheap
small tubes are available.

The reason is that I sometimes have larger holes
from side wall blow-outs. Not inch-long gashes
but one or two tenths of an inch long. The tubes
I use are super thick and, therefore, expensive.
$15-20 each and that's not something to be thrown
out lightly. Instead of the li'l REMA patches I
need to use thicker rubber from an older
sacrified tube but this has to be
vulcanized/cemented really well.


Thanks to all responders (also Barry and Doug).
I'll order Slime Rubber Cement with my next Amazon
shipment because that's what David uses, he says it
works well and it isn't expensive:

https://www.amazon.com/Slime-1050-Ru.../dp/B003V9UU66



Whatwhat!! Are you *seriously* claiming r.b.t has been useful!? What
ever is the world coming to?


Usenet is very useful, I guess that's where the name
comes from. A lot of hints here go into my bicycle
files, in the sense of "If ... ever breaks consider
replacing it with ..." or "If it breaks don't ever use
...".

When I mentioned in a post in a newsgroup that I had
bonked, want to avoid it but can't stand the cyclist
astronaut food or any sweet stuff someone responded
with a link to a recipe for homemade non-sweet power
bars. My wife bakes them to this day. Yesterday I
shared these bars with another rider who really likes
them as well. Can't buy them anywhere.


Out of curiosity, is your wife's recipe actually free of
sugar, in any form, or it just doesn't taste sweet?


It has a pinch of sugar for some reason, not sure if that
can be left out or replaced with something else. You can't
taste it though. While they also mention just a pinch of
salt we add several pinches because in summer one sweats
out a lot of salt here.

Got it only in German but if really interested I could
translate it:

http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/14555...sliriegel.html



It's a little more work than it looks like, with the bacon and all that,
and cutting into bars at the end so they can be packed on a
bicycle. My wife puts all of them into the freezer and then
moves as many as needed to the fridge a couple days before
rides.

That looks like a recipe for some sort of Oatmeal cookies
with bacon, rather than the usual "power Bar" concept, which
is usually something that your body can get a quick bunch of
energy from to replace what you have lost.


I make sure I eat them during a scheduled break at some nice
and scenic area, not after I begin to feel a hard bonk coming
up. The latter is a mistake I only made once and don't want to
experience that again. These bar get me through the rides quite
nicely. Usually 40-45 miles, partially under a lot of power.

The difference is usually in how fast your body converts
carbohydrates to energy. Simple carbohydrates, essentially
sugars, are converted rapidly and complex carbohydrates like
starches are converted much slower. Which is, of course, why all
the energy drinks contain dextrose or sucrose or some other
simple carbs.


This is why I carry dextrose tablets in my first aid kit. So far I
never needed one of those myself but others did.


Back when I was running I "bonked" or may better, "crashed and
burned". I reached the point where even after sitting down and
resting for a while I physically could not run any longer. I
would sit down and rest until I felt better and set off again and
within 100 yards, or less, wouldn't be able to run any more.



That is exactly how one MTB ride ended for me. I still had to ride
about 10 miles home and did. Unfortunately mostly uphill. Those 10
miles took me about two hours and several times I had the urge to
just plop myself into the grass and sleep. Luckily I was riding
with a friend who made sure I didn't do that. Early on he gave me a
liquid energy pack but it didn't help at all. I guess once you are
in the bonk it's too late.

-- Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/


Jeorg, perhaps you like your present road bike or cannot afford
another but otherwise I do not see why you don't get a cyclocross
bike.



Because I am married :-)

I love this old steel frame bike and considering that I also have two
MTB in the garage my wife would (rightfully) want me to get rid of it
should I buy a cyclocross bike.


I have two and enough room between the stays and fork to mount
32 mm tires. Since these are little more than standard road bikes
with more room between the stays you can set them up for anything
from hard off-road to street.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/5960735902.html


Nice but if I ever get a new road bike it'll be similar to one of these
in titanium:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...comp_ti_xv.htm

Ideally not 11-speed (7 or 8 would be nice but I guess I'd have to
settle for 10) and eyelets for a rear rack would be great but I'll
probably have to make brackets.

My current steel-frame road bike has very sturdy rack mounts which is
important to me. I often carry a lot of load on roads of that dreaded
"Californian quality". It is 7-speed, was 6-speed but I converted it
after the last UG freehub went ka-crunch.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #234  
Old January 19th 17, 09:28 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 13,447
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/19/2017 2:16 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 17:36, Phil Lee wrote:
Joerg considered Mon, 16 Jan
2017
10:01:41 -0800 the perfect time to write:

On 2017-01-05 08:31, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/5/2017 9:59 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-05 07:34, wrote:
On Wednesday, January 4, 2017 at 8:47:35 PM UTC-8, Phil
Lee wrote:
Joerg considered Wed, 04
Jan
2017
07:38:10 -0800 the perfect time to write:

On 2017-01-04 01:19, Tosspot wrote:
On 04/01/17 01:04, Joerg wrote:
Gentlemen,


snip snip snip
The thing you need is the tire to _fit_ _through_ the chain
stay. _No_ 29" tire does on my road bike.
Get it now?


http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/brknaxle.jpg

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #235  
Old January 19th 17, 09:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-18 14:10, James wrote:
On 19/01/17 02:51, Joerg wrote:


This is why I carry dextrose tablets in my first aid kit. So far I
never needed one of those myself but others did.


Wow. Dextrose tablets for others, but no chain breaker tool, instead
preferring rocks and fencing wire to fix the broken chains.


The reasoning is simple. Rocks and wire can easily be found in the
wilderness. Dextrose tablets can't be. A friend and I once came upon a
guy who had simply walked off the trail and dropped. After waking him
which took a long time he was prety much catatonic. Luckily we noticed
him. I don't know if he would have made the long trek out if we didn't
have ample water and dextrose to pump into him.


I guess it is more practical for me to be able to fix a chain and still
be able to ride. I have never been so hunger flat that I cannot turn
the pedals at all.


Yeah, but you might come upon other people who are. If you never venture
far into the wilderness you may never encounter that situation and are
probably unaware of how dangerous it can be. No cell phone signal, no
roads, no nothing, just the relentlessly scorching sun and lots of miles
to get yourself and the victim out.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #236  
Old January 19th 17, 10:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Fuel: was: Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-18 19:28, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Mon, 16 Jan 2017 17:11:50 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

Got it only in German but if really interested I could translate it:

http://www.chefkoch.de/rezepte/14555...sliriegel.html

I was rather surprised that I could read that. For example, knowing
the history of the haversack told me at once that "haferfloken" are
rolled oats. Knowing for sure that the extraneous parts were
extraneous took some dictionary work, though.


That's a situation I often encounter during my job when a technical
document comes in and it's in Portuguese or some other language that I
do not know well.


It's a little more work than it looks like, with the bacon and all that,
and cutting into bars at the end so they can be packed on a bicycle.


I think that I could substitute Aldi's bacon bits for finely-gewrfelt
bacon; "Speck ausbraten ohne Fett" appears to say that one should fry
all the fat out.


The site does not render well anymore on my PC. But yes, my wife fries
thick bacon cut in little cubes until the fat is gone. Otherwise I'd
soon have a bunch of mountain lions trailing me :-)


My
wife puts all of them into the freezer and then moves as many as needed
to the fridge a couple days before rides.


Back when I made high-calorie muffins (one cup each of raisins,
sunflower seed, self-rising mixed edible powder, and sweet liquid), I
put them into my pannier still frozen, so that they would stay fresh
longer.

I don't think that I used them on cold days, since I wanted to stop
inside warm places as often as possible. Also, I rode down into the
cities instead of up into the boonies in the winter.


I also ride down into the valley a lot, where the cities are. While I
usually drop by at a brewpub on the way back I have my meal break
somewhere along a pristine bike path or singletrack, out in the
wilderness. No man-made noises except occasional an aircraft.


It took me years, maybe decades, to figure out that I could cut them
into bars after baking if I spread the dough on a cookie sheet
(technically a jelly-roll pan). Cutting into bars is nothing compared
to filling eighteen muffin cups.


We use a regular large kitchen knife and they don't crumble.


I tried baking the dough in a square pan and slicing the cake, but the
slices fell into crumbs. I don't know how long it took me to realize
that all they needed was more crust.


My wife uses one extra egg in the recipe which makes it all stick
together better. The bars don't even come apart on very rough MTB rides
where the stuff in the panniers sloshes round and round (it all
literally does rotate around in there).


But these days I mostly eat Aldi's "protein bars" -- more like Rice
Krispies Treats, if you remember that fad, but denser and not sticky.
I've gotten into the habit of carrying more food than I intend to eat,
and I'm glad of it several times a year.


We have no Aldi in the California Sierra but I remember those stores
from Europe.


Since I now *start* inside the city, I usually plan to buy food along
the way, and seldom intend to eat *any* of what's in my pannier.
Store-bought bars have the overwhelming advantage that left-overs can
be saved for the next trip even if it's a week off.

I forgot to bring spare food once, and said, no sweat, I'll buy a
package of bars at Owen's West. After circling the store several
times, I realized that there is a good reason that I always buy my
food bars at Aldi. (This was before Breakfast Biscuits appeared, and
even those require a little cream cheese.) Just as I despaired of
finding anything edible, I noticed a store employee re-arranging the
bananas. Duh!


If you can get fruit, all the better. I usually can't, on account of no
stores being found along singletrack. When heading west on the El Dorado
Trail I pack baby carrots but they are almost all for Ivan the horse.
Got permission from the owner. The deal with Ivan is that he gets to eat
25, I get two or three. After all, he is much bigger.

Now that I started brewing beer again I am planning on changing back to
bread for bike rides. The trub that is the very nutricious residue after
racking off the beer from the primary fermenter is just dumped by most
brewers. Sad. Not here, we use it and make this bread:

http://hubpages.com/food/SALLIEANNES...sing-Beer-Trub

Ours deviates in that we keep the dough on the hard side. I use an
electric drill with a kneading hook to mix it (after smoking out
numerous kitchen mixers in the past) and then bake it on a steel plate
in the regular Weber Kettle barbecue. Mostly over almond wood fire
burned down to the coals which results in a dark thick and crunchy
crust. Lots of hop flavor in the bread. That with chease and cold cuts
is an excellent meal on a bike ride. I don't use butter or margarine.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #237  
Old January 19th 17, 10:13 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Mark J.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 840
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/18/2017 5:45 PM, jbeattie wrote:
With that said, I have spent an inordinate amount of time trying to get my studs to bead. Getting them on the rim is no problem at all, I just have to beat on them to get them to seat properly. But then the whole act of snow riding around here is an act of self-abuse, so beating on the tires is just kind of a warm-up. But I will not endure that sort of abuse just mounting an every-day tires.


Studded Nokian Hakkapeliittas (700x32-5ish) seat really easily, wear
long, and have great grip. I broke down and bought a set a few years
back and have never regretted it; life is too short to ride crappy tires.

Mark J., 50 miles south of you (where ice is less frequent, and the
commute is flat.)

  #238  
Old January 19th 17, 10:38 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-19 12:25, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2017 2:04 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 12:11, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/18/2017 11:33 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 09:18, jbeattie wrote:
On Wednesday, January 18, 2017 at 7:36:44 AM UTC-8, Joerg
wrote:
On 2017-01-17 15:26, DATAKOLL MARINE RESEARCH wrote:
analog,

I will not explain tire mounting again. Retard at your
own speed


I have explained to you that these are _flat_ rims.
Hard to
understand?

The Argent rim is just a Mod E2. Right?


Mine are Mavic Module “3” Argent “D”. Almost flat
inside.


http://equusbicycle.com/bike/mavic/images/11and12.jpg
Pretty
standard rim of the era. Get VAR lever. It lifts the bead
over the
rim. Your problems will be solved. Getting another tire
or rim will
also solve your problems. Most people will not wrestle
with a tire
for a half-an-hour, at least not more than once.


I have broken many high quality levers on those and bike
shop owners have confirmed that issue. When they say "Good
luck getting them on" you know what you are up to.

The thick tubes I have do not exactly help in keeping the
bead towards the center but I made myself Delrin pieces to
do that. The relief that this provides is very limited
though, as evidenced by the fact that even with thin tubes
Gatorskins are really hard to mount onto these rims.

Fact is, the Vredestein tires always went on with ease and
the Gatorskin tires do not. Huge difference. However, the
Vredesteins had too many flats. So, I am looking for a tire
that is very puncture-resistant, has sturdy side walls _and_
is easy to mount. Eventually I will find one and then buy a
stack of them. Just like I did for the MTB where I found
three brands that work well.


That's a known deficient design with hardly any drop
between the bead
seats and the center well. Not only those Mavic, but Trek
copied it for
some all-time-lousy rims under their Bontrager brand. Very
hard to
mount/remove tires; Joerg is not making that up.


The weird phenomenon is that in the olden days all tires fit
fine. All of them. I put north of 50k miles on that bike
just in the 80's and used up rear tires as if they were
popcorn. All kinds of brands but mostly Vredestein. The
beads went on with ease, in minutes. Now some tires seem to
be subpar in bead diameter tolerance. For example,
Gatorskins take over an hour to wrestle them on (with breaks
because the thumbs hurt so much). Once they have been on
there for a while it becomes easier to take them off and put
them back on. How much easier depends on the time they've
been on the rim, not how many times they were mounted or how
many miles were ridden. That seems to indicate that the
beads stretch while on there.

Sometimes things really were better in the good old days. I
realized that again just now when re-working a wine fridge.
The design and the workmanship was, in part, rather messed
up. That somehow rarely happened in the 50's (we have a
Bosch fridge from 1956, still running great).


The good old days were sometimes but mostly not.

Anyone who wrestled tires to seat on undersized steel rims all day long
[1] will have a different view from yours. That process involves tedium,
muscle and the occasional chunks of rubber in the eye after a loud bang.
Sharp edges, swarf and slag from seam welds were very common when steel
rims were the norm, in all brands. Even on good rims, oversized Pirelli
and Carideng cotton tires blew off frequently. Then French bikes with
spokes sticking through the nipples. I could go on.

[1] I'm thinking here of several batches of off-spec Schwinn EA1
chromed rims.


That sounds horrid. I must have been very lucky while living in Europe.
My current and back then expensive custom bike was only used for
longhaul rides and only if the theft risk was low. Meaning never for
rides into Aachen, Maastricht or other large cities. For that, regular
commutes and also my whole time at highschool I used "beater bikes".
Cheap department store road bikes, steel rims, none of them of a value
when new than what around $150 would nowadays buy. Yet I never had any
issues with tires and rims. I generally use the cheapest tires I could
find in order not to cause a dent in more important budgets such as the
ones for dates and for beer.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #239  
Old January 19th 17, 10:39 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,538
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/19/2017 3:28 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/19/2017 2:16 PM, Joerg wrote:

snip snip snip
The thing you need is the tire to _fit_ _through_ the chain
stay. _No_ 29" tire does on my road bike.
Get it now?


http://www.yellowjersey.org/photosfr...t/brknaxle.jpg


On one tour, we stayed at a Warm Showers host who had a bike identical
to my Cannondale tourer. He showed me the frame, hanging in his garage.
That place was completely worn through on both chainstays. He had
done a long tour (Illinois to New Mexico, IIRC) that involved lots of
gravel roads, probably with extra wide tires. The road grit eventually
ground a big hole in each chainstay.

Interestingly, he said the holes were there for about half the tour, and
didn't seem to affect the ride at all.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #240  
Old January 19th 17, 10:51 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-17 17:51, John B. wrote:
On Tue, 17 Jan 2017 10:27:27 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 1/16/2017 11:10 PM, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, January 16, 2017 at 10:28:41 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, January 16, 2017 at 4:23:53 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-16 13:39, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Monday, January 16, 2017 at 2:39:18 PM UTC-5, jbeattie wrote:
On Monday, January 16, 2017 at 11:03:05 AM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-16 10:43, David Scheidt wrote:
Joerg wrote:

:Yup. Standard bicycle tubes are usually junk. Would you accept
it if you :had to pump up the tires of your car every two
weeks? Yet most cyclists :think this is "normal".

Automotive tires have a much lower ratio of surface area to
volume than bike tires. They're also run a lower pressure, for
the most part.


Truck tires are often operated around 50psi or higher. Like my
MTB tires are.

A truck tire weights as a much as TWO UCI minimum race bikes -- or
one DH bike. Now throw in the rim. You have peculiar expectations
for bicycles. You're theoretically perfect bike would weigh about
250lbs.

-- Jay Beattie.

I've said it before and I'll say it again. What Joerg's wants in a
bicycle are would be met by a 250cc dirt-motorcycle converted to
pedal power and the engine removed.

I find it astounding that so many others who ride in very harsh
conditions do NOT have the breakages or other problems that Joerg
does.


According to several bicycle shop owners they do. Many said that two
factors allowed them to survive as a business:

1. Mountain bikers breaking stuff all the time.

2. Department store bike buyers who needed help and found that the store
that sold their bikes was less than helpful.

Unlike cars, which never need to be fixed, and that's why there are no auto repair shops. http://tinyurl.com/jba5fgb

-- Jay Beattie.

Read Joerg's post from over the years and you'll see that Joerg takes great delight in complaining. Joerg does not want/need a bicycle - he needs/wants a pedal powered motorcycle.

For his bicycle he should just buy solid rubber tires and be done with every needing to fix a flat or pump them up.


Seriously, Joerg, why are you _not_ using solid tires? (I mean, except
for the general principle that nothing ever works for Joerg.)

Yes, they would be heavy and slow, but you've said dozens of times that
you don't care about that. They would be rugged and thorn proof. The
sidewalls would never blow out.

Is it because you'd have to stop typing your sound effects?
("Kabloooeeee!")


After the "Ka pow" post I got to thinking. I've never seen a tire
sidewall fail except when the tire was run with no, or very low,
pressure. It is fairly common on large trucks. One tire of a dual tire
set gets a leak and runs flat for a while and the heat build up causes
the tire to nearly disintegrate. My wife had one a while ago. Never
checks her tires and set off on a 300 Km trip on a high speed highway
with "soft" tires. Ka pow!


On road bikes it usually happens when hitting a rock "just so". Like
when the rock gets under the tire off center and flies off to the side
with gusto. Or when going through a lot of gravel. On the MTB it can
happen at any time during gnarly trail sections.

The other side wall wearing effect is mud. The tire begins to load up
with that and eventually a huge clump cakes around the BB area and
sometimes under the crown of the fork. Later things start to grind ...
phssseeeeeeeee ... now what on earth is that noise? Oh!

The last Gatorskin had threads many inches long flopping about off a
side wall.

This was different decades ago. I sometimes had a dynamo that was frozen
up but I kept riding because I thought it was just another bulb
burn-out. Until I noticed the noise and that there was a rubbing chunk
of frozen slush instead of a turning knurled roller. Yet no kaboom.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
 




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