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Stronger rubber cement?



 
 
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  #251  
Old January 20th 17, 04:45 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-18 17:19, AMuzi wrote:
On 1/18/2017 7:06 PM, John B. wrote:
On Wed, 18 Jan 2017 15:01:43 -0500, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

On 1/18/2017 1:29 PM, wrote:
On Tuesday, January 17, 2017 at 8:10:41 PM UTC-6, John B. wrote:
I have a set of wheels with sew ups somewhere. I last used them
maybe
40 years ago. I've never raced, so sew ups offer no benefits to
me. I
wonder if they still will hold air?


When you have a flat they are much faster to fix. Just rip the flat
off the rim and stick on another from the collection you have strapped
under the seat :-)

John B.

Have you ever fixed a tubular on the side of the road? Or even in
the shop at home? No one just rips off the flat tubular and quickly
sticks the new one on the rim. Does not happen that way in the real
world. Maybe in fantasy land. Tubulars are glued on very well. It
takes a lot of pulling and prying to get a little bit of the tire
off the rim. Then a lot of strength to slowly pull the rest of the
tire off the rim. Several minutes of work or more. Then to put the
new one on, you better pray it is well stretched on an old rim. You
start at one side and slowly work it onto the rim with old glue.
Slowly pulling it on. Then the last few inches you strain and
stress until maybe hopefully you get it on. Then you spend several
more minutes trying to get the tire somewhat straight on the rim.
The old glue does not allow the tire to be moved very easily. Keep
living in your fantasy world.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYwfMlEGWlA



Or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07LT-fGnpvk
which parallels my experiences.
--
Cheers,

John B.


Good technique.
If the last bit is tight on the rim, you will have a lumpy valve area
and short tire life.

I usually do that without neon nail polish. Is that OK?


But with a hula skirt :-)

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
Ads
  #252  
Old January 20th 17, 06:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/20/2017 10:43 AM, Joerg wrote:


As explained many times 20mph is the speed on flat sections of trail or
slightly higher when downsloping a little. My average trail speed is
more around 10-12mph depending on turf unless I want to push it. Meaning
there are murky or gnarly stretches in the low single digit mph. There
are people on this NG who do not understand the difference between top
speed and average speed.


Well, to be fair, you've bragged endlessly about how fast you ride when
that suits you, and you've switched to saying how slow you ride when
that suits you. You seldom clarified whether you were talking about
average or instantaneous speed, until people began calling you on the
discrepancies in your posts.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #253  
Old January 20th 17, 07:17 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
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Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-20 09:35, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/20/2017 10:43 AM, Joerg wrote:


As explained many times 20mph is the speed on flat sections of trail or
slightly higher when downsloping a little. My average trail speed is
more around 10-12mph depending on turf unless I want to push it. Meaning
there are murky or gnarly stretches in the low single digit mph. There
are people on this NG who do not understand the difference between top
speed and average speed.


Well, to be fair, you've bragged endlessly about how fast you ride when
that suits you, and you've switched to saying how slow you ride when
that suits you. You seldom clarified whether you were talking about
average or instantaneous speed, until people began calling you on the
discrepancies in your posts.


No. All I wrote was that I routinely ride 20mph on trails and that's a
fact. There are no discrepancies. Back then I brought that up because I
expect the riding equipment to hold up under those conditions and some
doesn't.

And yes, I do take the liberty of riding 1mph at times when I want to.
On singletrack watching animals or scenery. Or recently on a MUP to
watch the massive release of water at Folsom Lake dam. For me bicycling
is about freedom and that also means freedom from motor vehicle traffic
whenever possible. Whether I ride at 20mph or 1mph nobody gets bothered
by it.

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #254  
Old January 20th 17, 08:29 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/20/2017 1:17 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-20 09:35, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/20/2017 10:43 AM, Joerg wrote:


As explained many times 20mph is the speed on flat sections of trail or
slightly higher when downsloping a little. My average trail speed is
more around 10-12mph depending on turf unless I want to push it. Meaning
there are murky or gnarly stretches in the low single digit mph. There
are people on this NG who do not understand the difference between top
speed and average speed.


Well, to be fair, you've bragged endlessly about how fast you ride when
that suits you, and you've switched to saying how slow you ride when
that suits you. You seldom clarified whether you were talking about
average or instantaneous speed, until people began calling you on the
discrepancies in your posts.


No...


Yes.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #255  
Old January 20th 17, 08:31 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 12:28:02 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 12:53, wrote:

Jeorg, perhaps you like your present road bike or cannot afford
another but otherwise I do not see why you don't get a cyclocross
bike.



Because I am married :-)


Tell me about it. :-)

I love this old steel frame bike and considering that I also have two
MTB in the garage my wife would (rightfully) want me to get rid of it
should I buy a cyclocross bike.


I have two and enough room between the stays and fork to mount
32 mm tires. Since these are little more than standard road bikes
with more room between the stays you can set them up for anything
from hard off-road to street.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/5960735902.html


Nice but if I ever get a new road bike it'll be similar to one of these
in titanium:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...comp_ti_xv.htm


There is a LOT of BS about hydraulic disks but as a crasher let me tell you that you DO NOT want them on your bike. Normally you ride with your hands over the brakes and in the case of hitting a hard bump your instinct is to squeeze the brakes. This is OK on an MTB with full suspension and a great deal more weight, but on a street or CX bike the bike will simply crash. I suppose you could ride with just your index finger on the brake but that loses you the control you need.

I put TRP 9.0 V-brakes on the Ridley and the difference in control is amazing. And despite what so many people say I've seen too many Titanium bikes crack at the welds in a pretty short time.

Ideally not 11-speed (7 or 8 would be nice but I guess I'd have to
settle for 10) and eyelets for a rear rack would be great but I'll
probably have to make brackets.

My current steel-frame road bike has very sturdy rack mounts which is
important to me. I often carry a lot of load on roads of that dreaded
"Californian quality". It is 7-speed, was 6-speed but I converted it
after the last UG freehub went ka-crunch.


You could fit a rack to the Ridley but I don't know of the reliability of the rear drop-out mounts.
  #256  
Old January 20th 17, 08:41 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,345
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 11:30:04 AM UTC-8, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/20/2017 1:17 PM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-20 09:35, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 1/20/2017 10:43 AM, Joerg wrote:


As explained many times 20mph is the speed on flat sections of trail or
slightly higher when downsloping a little. My average trail speed is
more around 10-12mph depending on turf unless I want to push it. Meaning
there are murky or gnarly stretches in the low single digit mph. There
are people on this NG who do not understand the difference between top
speed and average speed.

Well, to be fair, you've bragged endlessly about how fast you ride when
that suits you, and you've switched to saying how slow you ride when
that suits you. You seldom clarified whether you were talking about
average or instantaneous speed, until people began calling you on the
discrepancies in your posts.


No...


Yes.


So you think of sprint speeds through stop lights as an average speed do you? I've noted many times that average speeds around here are 12 mph for a hilly ride to 14 mph for a flat ride. So higher speeds wouldn't be "averages" now would they?

You certainly have a lot of memory problems for someone that is complaining about my memory problems.
  #257  
Old January 20th 17, 08:46 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 1,424
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 11:31:21 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 12:28:02 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 12:53, wrote:

Jeorg, perhaps you like your present road bike or cannot afford
another but otherwise I do not see why you don't get a cyclocross
bike.



Because I am married :-)


Tell me about it. :-)

I love this old steel frame bike and considering that I also have two
MTB in the garage my wife would (rightfully) want me to get rid of it
should I buy a cyclocross bike.


I have two and enough room between the stays and fork to mount
32 mm tires. Since these are little more than standard road bikes
with more room between the stays you can set them up for anything
from hard off-road to street.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/5960735902.html


Nice but if I ever get a new road bike it'll be similar to one of these
in titanium:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...comp_ti_xv.htm


There is a LOT of BS about hydraulic disks but as a crasher let me tell you that you DO NOT want them on your bike. Normally you ride with your hands over the brakes and in the case of hitting a hard bump your instinct is to squeeze the brakes. This is OK on an MTB with full suspension and a great deal more weight, but on a street or CX bike the bike will simply crash. I suppose you could ride with just your index finger on the brake but that loses you the control you need.


That is what you are supposed to do
Independant and simultaneous operation of controls is fundamental


  #258  
Old January 20th 17, 09:43 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
JBeattie
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,870
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 11:31:21 AM UTC-8, wrote:
On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 12:28:02 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 12:53, wrote:

Jeorg, perhaps you like your present road bike or cannot afford
another but otherwise I do not see why you don't get a cyclocross
bike.



Because I am married :-)


Tell me about it. :-)

I love this old steel frame bike and considering that I also have two
MTB in the garage my wife would (rightfully) want me to get rid of it
should I buy a cyclocross bike.


I have two and enough room between the stays and fork to mount
32 mm tires. Since these are little more than standard road bikes
with more room between the stays you can set them up for anything
from hard off-road to street.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/5960735902.html


Nice but if I ever get a new road bike it'll be similar to one of these
in titanium:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...comp_ti_xv.htm


There is a LOT of BS about hydraulic disks but as a crasher let me tell you that you DO NOT want them on your bike. Normally you ride with your hands over the brakes and in the case of hitting a hard bump your instinct is to squeeze the brakes. This is OK on an MTB with full suspension and a great deal more weight, but on a street or CX bike the bike will simply crash. I suppose you could ride with just your index finger on the brake but that loses you the control you need.

I put TRP 9.0 V-brakes on the Ridley and the difference in control is amazing. And despite what so many people say I've seen too many Titanium bikes crack at the welds in a pretty short time.


I have hydraulic discs on a Roubaix and cable discs on my CX commuter bike. I've never gone OTB because of my brakes. The last time I went OTB it was with ordinary caliper brakes and because my son had crashed in front of me on a wet descent.

The hydraulic brakes are powerful and they do take some use to understand. Front braking is not all that much different from a good dual pivot; however, rear braking is much more positive, and that is where you have to avoid ham-handedness. This takes about 90 seconds to figure out, and most rear wheel skids are controllable during the learning period.

Both the cable and hydraulic brakes beat the hell out of calipers in rain and slop, like the snow slop I've been trying to ride in. In dry weather, any good rim brake will do the job. I don't see any reason for hydraulic discs on high-end race bikes that will never be ridden in the rain, except maybe to avoid over-heating CF rims -- which could be a real problem with tubulars, although I'm just speculating. Personally, I think its just marketing.

-- Jay Beattie.


lthough the rear braking is so good that you have to be careful.
  #259  
Old January 20th 17, 09:58 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Joerg[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6,016
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On 2017-01-20 11:31, wrote:
On Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 12:28:02 PM UTC-8, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-18 12:53,
wrote:

Jeorg, perhaps you like your present road bike or cannot afford
another but otherwise I do not see why you don't get a
cyclocross bike.



Because I am married :-)


Tell me about it. :-)


But I still love her :-)


I love this old steel frame bike and considering that I also have
two MTB in the garage my wife would (rightfully) want me to get rid
of it should I buy a cyclocross bike.


I have two and enough room between the stays and fork to mount 32
mm tires. Since these are little more than standard road bikes
with more room between the stays you can set them up for
anything from hard off-road to street.

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/bik/5960735902.html


Nice but if I ever get a new road bike it'll be similar to one of
these in titanium:

http://www.bikesdirect.com/products/...comp_ti_xv.htm



There is a LOT of BS about hydraulic disks but as a crasher let me
tell you that you DO NOT want them on your bike. Normally you ride
with your hands over the brakes and in the case of hitting a hard
bump your instinct is to squeeze the brakes. This is OK on an MTB
with full suspension and a great deal more weight, but on a street or
CX bike the bike will simply crash. I suppose you could ride with
just your index finger on the brake but that loses you the control
you need.


My MTB has very fast reacting disc brakes. I generally ride with just
the index and middle fingers over the brake handles. A good squeeze from
two fingers can lock up the wheels. Yet I only locked them up when I
wanted to. Like when I accidentally blew by a trail turn-off and was
heading for a rock slide, and let the front and rear dig into the loose
gravel.

Rim brakes do not work well in mud and rain. The worst is the delay when
the rim is soaked. Precious seconds go by and that could cause a crash.
Almost has on my old MTB with rim brakes.

The only time I almost went over the bar was when I test-rode the new
MTB in the LBS parking lot. I didn't instantly remember that bicycle
disc brakes could be this powerful and the rear wheel came off the
pavement for a second.

Ever since I rode a bicycle with disc brakes for the first time I never
looked back.


I put TRP 9.0 V-brakes on the Ridley and the difference in control is
amazing. And despite what so many people say I've seen too many
Titanium bikes crack at the welds in a pretty short time.


My MTB buddy has a Ti-MTB from BikesDirect. It's been through nyumerous
nasty crashes and ... not even a dent.


Ideally not 11-speed (7 or 8 would be nice but I guess I'd have to
settle for 10) and eyelets for a rear rack would be great but I'll
probably have to make brackets.

My current steel-frame road bike has very sturdy rack mounts which
is important to me. I often carry a lot of load on roads of that
dreaded "Californian quality". It is 7-speed, was 6-speed but I
converted it after the last UG freehub went ka-crunch.


You could fit a rack to the Ridley but I don't know of the
reliability of the rear drop-out mounts.


It would have to tolerate well in excess of 50lbs while going at a good
clip on road like this:

http://www.themirrornewspaper.com/wp.../AW_Noward.jpg

--
Regards, Joerg

http://www.analogconsultants.com/
  #260  
Old January 20th 17, 10:06 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 3,345
Default Stronger rubber cement?

On Friday, January 20, 2017 at 12:43:50 PM UTC-8, jbeattie wrote:

I have hydraulic discs on a Roubaix and cable discs on my CX commuter bike. I've never gone OTB because of my brakes. The last time I went OTB it was with ordinary caliper brakes and because my son had crashed in front of me on a wet descent.


Well you I don't remember the last time I ever had any sort of exceptional power with dual axle caliper brakes. Very much the opposite in fact. Mechanical disks are NOTHING like hydraulics that are properly set up.

Does your Roubaix have one of those 7" disks? I would imagine that there is a great deal less danger from the power of a disk on roads compared to off-road. On steep off-road you take your hand off of the brakes and in 40 feet you can go from 8 mph to 30 mph only to hit more rough roads. On full suspension that isn't a problem but CX not only doesn't have suspension but is about the weight of a road bike. With low gearing it simply lifts the front wheel off of the ground on hard push up a steep uphill (20% or more).

The hydraulic brakes are powerful and they do take some use to understand.. Front braking is not all that much different from a good dual pivot; however, rear braking is much more positive, and that is where you have to avoid ham-handedness.


This takes about 90 seconds to figure out, and most rear wheel skids are controllable during the learning period.
This isn't anything that isn't part of the game. Talking to the local shop mechanic he said that you can't use the bottom two gears usually and the trick is to use third (which is about the same as a low road bike triple gear 30-28) for climbing the steep part and then use the lower gears to go ultra-slow and rest when the trail flattens out a little. This really works well and my average over a hard trail went up a couple of MPH using this trick..

Both the cable and hydraulic brakes beat the hell out of calipers in rain and slop, like the snow slop I've been trying to ride in. In dry weather, any good rim brake will do the job. I don't see any reason for hydraulic discs on high-end race bikes that will never be ridden in the rain, except maybe to avoid over-heating CF rims -- which could be a real problem with tubulars, although I'm just speculating. Personally, I think its just marketing.


I don't ride in rain though it is muddy off road a good deal. And I had no problems with V-brakes.
 




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