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Stronger rubber cement?



 
 
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  #341  
Old January 26th 17, 08:14 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
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Posts: 10,538
Default Fuel: was: Stronger rubber cement?

On 1/26/2017 9:32 AM, Phil Lee wrote:
Frank Krygowski considered Sun, 22 Jan 2017
11:56:03 -0500 the perfect time to write:

On 1/22/2017 10:50 AM, Joerg wrote:
On 2017-01-21 18:11, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Sat, 21 Jan 2017 07:42:00 -0800, Joerg
wrote:

When you go on trails, it will. I have had very tightly packed panniers
stuffed out with towels and other things. Two miles down the trail I
opened one to look if I had turned on the cell phone. Everything was
upside down. It is like a roller coaster in there.

You've got to leave it no room to wiggle.


Doesn't work.


Not surprising! Has anyone here ever seen any suggestion work for Joerg?


It's just another thing that we can add to the ever-growing list of
"stuff that Joerg doesn't know how to do properly".

Just for Joerg's information, the level of shaking experienced by
things packed properly into a pannier on a bicycle (especially as he
is so enthusiastic about full suspension) is as nothing compared to
what cartons of goods go through when being handled by contract
carriers, the staff of who's warehouses are often minimum wage and the
prevalent attitude is that if the box is marked "fragile" then it
must've been particularly well packed, and can therefore be abused
even more!


Many years ago, one American tech magazine (Popular Mechanics or Popular
Science?) bought a few "drop meters" (to register heights of drop and
resulting impacts) and packaged them for mailing, using various shipping
methods and markings. IIRC, the "FRAGILE" ones were dropped from
something like four feet. The meters without any special caution
markings were found to be broken on arrival.


Most people will have seen airline baggage handlers at work, where
cases slip off trolleys or conveyors and get thrown back on - now
think what happens when similar people are working all day with
anonymous looking beige boxes completely out of sight of the public!
Throw in the harsh suspension of most large goods vehicles, which
leaves anything in the back bouncing around with LOTS of space to
gather momentum before it slams into the walls, doors, or even roof (I
**** you not).


I've mentioned this before, but when we and our bikes (full sized,
packed in bike boxes, marked "FRAGILE, BICYCLE, THIS END UP" etc.)
arrived at Dublin's airport, I got to see our bikes lying on their
sides, stacked three high, on the roof of the cab of the luggage truck.
So much for "THIS END UP."

Then I got to watch the driver reach up and push them off the roof,
where they slid BANG! down onto the asphalt.

Amazingly, there was no damage. Made me a little proud of my packing
technique.


--
- Frank Krygowski
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  #342  
Old January 26th 17, 08:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 1,424
Default Fuel: was: Stronger rubber cement?


Many years ago, one American tech magazine (Popular Mechanics or Popular
Science?) bought a few "drop meters" (to register heights of drop and
resulting impacts) and packaged them for mailing, using various shipping
methods and markings. IIRC, the "FRAGILE" ones were dropped from
something like four feet. The meters without any special caution
markings were found to be broken on arrival.


Most people will have seen airline baggage handlers at work, where
cases slip off trolleys or conveyors and get thrown back on - now
think what happens when similar people are working all day with
anonymous looking beige boxes completely out of sight of the public!
Throw in the harsh suspension of most large goods vehicles, which
leaves anything in the back bouncing around with LOTS of space to
gather momentum before it slams into the walls, doors, or even roof (I
**** you not).


I've mentioned this before, but when we and our bikes (full sized,
packed in bike boxes, marked "FRAGILE, BICYCLE, THIS END UP" etc.)
arrived at Dublin's airport, I got to see our bikes lying on their
sides, stacked three high, on the roof of the cab of the luggage truck.
So much for "THIS END UP."


Transporting contraband in your water bottle is similarly futile.




 




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