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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #231  
Old June 22nd 15, 12:53 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,001
Default AG: Riding is Communication


I had a conversation on the road Saturday:

I was riding down a lightly-traveled county road when I saw a pick-up
truck coming toward me, and a car in my mirror. So I turned my head
as if looking back, then shifted toward the middle of my half of the
road. Once the truck was past, I looked back again and shifted to the
edge of the pavement. The car promptly overtook me properly.

In English:

Me: Oops, it's not safe to pass right now.
Driver: Now that you mention it, I can see that.
Me: Now it's safe.
Driver: So it is.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


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  #232  
Old June 22nd 15, 03:54 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,394
Default AG: Riding is Communication

On 6/21/2015 7:53 PM, Joy Beeson wrote:

I had a conversation on the road Saturday:

I was riding down a lightly-traveled county road when I saw a pick-up
truck coming toward me, and a car in my mirror. So I turned my head
as if looking back, then shifted toward the middle of my half of the
road. Once the truck was past, I looked back again and shifted to the
edge of the pavement. The car promptly overtook me properly.

In English:

Me: Oops, it's not safe to pass right now.
Driver: Now that you mention it, I can see that.
Me: Now it's safe.
Driver: So it is.


Beautiful!

It's sad that so many people think that's impossible.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #233  
Old June 28th 15, 05:12 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,001
Default AG: On being overtaken


Always check your mirror immediately after a motor vehicle passes you.
There might be another hidden in its noise.

That includes low-flying airplanes! (Luckily, the driver of the truck
that I didn't see saw me. After that I looked back every time the
cropduster passed.)

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.
  #234  
Old June 28th 15, 05:19 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,001
Default AG: Twist-ties

(written 24 June 2015)

I solved a problem with twist-ties yesterday.

I stopped at a fruit market, where I bought a bag of Jonagold apples
and, for lunch, a ham sandwich and a small bag of potato chips.

As usual, I ate only half my lunch. (I ate all of the taco salad that
I bought for supper, and lived to regret it.) The sandwich was no
problem; I re-wrapped it in the sheet of plastic it had come in and
put it beside the bottle of ice in my cooler.

But I had no clothespin to close the potato-chip bag, and there was no
use in searching my pockets for a paper clip: I'd inventoried my
pockets before the ride. (Gets up to string a couple of paper clips
on the safety pin in my emergency bag.)

Perhaps if I wrap the bag around the remaining chips instead of
rolling it down -- that works, but if I wedge it in tightly enough to
keep the bag from unrolling, I'll crush the chips. What I need is a
piece of string. There was a little paper bobbin of linespun-linen
carpet thread in the first-aid kit in the lost toolkit. I'll never
see linespun linen again, but upon thought, I do have some pre-wound
"bobbins" (they are actually cakes of thread, so wound as to hold
their shape with no actual bobbin) of nylon sewing thread. (Gets up
to pop one into a "pill pouch" (mini zip-lock bag) and add it to
emergency kit.)

Then I remembered that I had a sheet of twist-ties in my memo-book
case, peeled off four, hooked them end-to-end, secured my potato
chips, and tossed them into a pannier.


--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.

  #235  
Old June 28th 15, 01:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Twist-ties

On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 01:19:19 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

(written 24 June 2015)

I solved a problem with twist-ties yesterday.

I stopped at a fruit market, where I bought a bag of Jonagold apples
and, for lunch, a ham sandwich and a small bag of potato chips.

As usual, I ate only half my lunch. (I ate all of the taco salad that
I bought for supper, and lived to regret it.) The sandwich was no
problem; I re-wrapped it in the sheet of plastic it had come in and
put it beside the bottle of ice in my cooler.

But I had no clothespin to close the potato-chip bag, and there was no
use in searching my pockets for a paper clip: I'd inventoried my
pockets before the ride. (Gets up to string a couple of paper clips
on the safety pin in my emergency bag.)

Perhaps if I wrap the bag around the remaining chips instead of
rolling it down -- that works, but if I wedge it in tightly enough to
keep the bag from unrolling, I'll crush the chips. What I need is a
piece of string. There was a little paper bobbin of linespun-linen
carpet thread in the first-aid kit in the lost toolkit. I'll never
see linespun linen again, but upon thought, I do have some pre-wound
"bobbins" (they are actually cakes of thread, so wound as to hold
their shape with no actual bobbin) of nylon sewing thread. (Gets up
to pop one into a "pill pouch" (mini zip-lock bag) and add it to
emergency kit.)

Then I remembered that I had a sheet of twist-ties in my memo-book
case, peeled off four, hooked them end-to-end, secured my potato
chips, and tossed them into a pannier.


I tried plastic "wire ties", or "cable ties" they are sometimes
called. Bad Move. They are impossible to get loose without a knife or
a pair of shears :-)

I've been using rubber bands, or just throwing the half bag of chips
away :-)
--
cheers,

John B.

  #236  
Old June 28th 15, 03:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Andrew Chaplin
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 207
Default AG: Twist-ties

John B. wrote in
:

On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 01:19:19 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

(written 24 June 2015)

I solved a problem with twist-ties yesterday.

I stopped at a fruit market, where I bought a bag of Jonagold apples
and, for lunch, a ham sandwich and a small bag of potato chips.

As usual, I ate only half my lunch. (I ate all of the taco salad that
I bought for supper, and lived to regret it.) The sandwich was no
problem; I re-wrapped it in the sheet of plastic it had come in and
put it beside the bottle of ice in my cooler.

But I had no clothespin to close the potato-chip bag, and there was no
use in searching my pockets for a paper clip: I'd inventoried my
pockets before the ride. (Gets up to string a couple of paper clips
on the safety pin in my emergency bag.)

Perhaps if I wrap the bag around the remaining chips instead of
rolling it down -- that works, but if I wedge it in tightly enough to
keep the bag from unrolling, I'll crush the chips. What I need is a
piece of string. There was a little paper bobbin of linespun-linen
carpet thread in the first-aid kit in the lost toolkit. I'll never
see linespun linen again, but upon thought, I do have some pre-wound
"bobbins" (they are actually cakes of thread, so wound as to hold
their shape with no actual bobbin) of nylon sewing thread. (Gets up
to pop one into a "pill pouch" (mini zip-lock bag) and add it to
emergency kit.)

Then I remembered that I had a sheet of twist-ties in my memo-book
case, peeled off four, hooked them end-to-end, secured my potato
chips, and tossed them into a pannier.


I tried plastic "wire ties", or "cable ties" they are sometimes
called. Bad Move. They are impossible to get loose without a knife or
a pair of shears :-)

I've been using rubber bands, or just throwing the half bag of chips
away :-)


I use Bulldog Clips (paper clamps) to hold chip bags closed.
--
Andrew Chaplin
SIT MIHI GLADIUS SICUT SANCTO MARTINO
(If you're going to e-mail me, you'll have to get "yourfinger." out.)
  #237  
Old June 28th 15, 04:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,394
Default AG: On being overtaken

On 6/28/2015 12:12 AM, Joy Beeson wrote:

Always check your mirror immediately after a motor vehicle passes you.
There might be another hidden in its noise.


Yep. That's precisely the reason I began using an eyeglass mirror, way
back in the 1970s, when they were even weirder than they are now!

That includes low-flying airplanes! (Luckily, the driver of the truck
that I didn't see saw me. After that I looked back every time the
cropduster passed.)


Cropduster? I hope you were holding your breath!


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #238  
Old June 29th 15, 01:18 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
john B.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,603
Default AG: Twist-ties

On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 18:29:21 +0100, Phil W Lee
wrote:

John B. considered Sun, 28 Jun 2015 19:55:46
+0700 the perfect time to write:

On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 01:19:19 -0300, Joy Beeson
wrote:

(written 24 June 2015)

I solved a problem with twist-ties yesterday.

I stopped at a fruit market, where I bought a bag of Jonagold apples
and, for lunch, a ham sandwich and a small bag of potato chips.

As usual, I ate only half my lunch. (I ate all of the taco salad that
I bought for supper, and lived to regret it.) The sandwich was no
problem; I re-wrapped it in the sheet of plastic it had come in and
put it beside the bottle of ice in my cooler.

But I had no clothespin to close the potato-chip bag, and there was no
use in searching my pockets for a paper clip: I'd inventoried my
pockets before the ride. (Gets up to string a couple of paper clips
on the safety pin in my emergency bag.)

Perhaps if I wrap the bag around the remaining chips instead of
rolling it down -- that works, but if I wedge it in tightly enough to
keep the bag from unrolling, I'll crush the chips. What I need is a
piece of string. There was a little paper bobbin of linespun-linen
carpet thread in the first-aid kit in the lost toolkit. I'll never
see linespun linen again, but upon thought, I do have some pre-wound
"bobbins" (they are actually cakes of thread, so wound as to hold
their shape with no actual bobbin) of nylon sewing thread. (Gets up
to pop one into a "pill pouch" (mini zip-lock bag) and add it to
emergency kit.)

Then I remembered that I had a sheet of twist-ties in my memo-book
case, peeled off four, hooked them end-to-end, secured my potato
chips, and tossed them into a pannier.


I tried plastic "wire ties", or "cable ties" they are sometimes
called. Bad Move. They are impossible to get loose without a knife or
a pair of shears :-)

Not if you get the reusable ones with the longer locking tab - easy to
flick open with a fingernail, and last almost forever.


I don't believe I ever saw such a thing.... not to say that they don't
exist, of course, as I am not really a major user of cable ties.


I've been using rubber bands, or just throwing the half bag of chips
away :-)


I also have a resealable sandwich bag in my normal kit, so could use
that as an alternative.

--
cheers,

John B.

  #239  
Old June 29th 15, 01:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,001
Default AG: Twist-ties

On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 18:29:21 +0100, Phil W Lee
wrote:

I also have a resealable sandwich bag in my normal kit, so could use
that as an alternative.


And I had a snack bag full of sandwich bags in the cooler! I wonder
whether I'd have remembered that if I hadn't figured out how to close
the potato-chip bag.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
  #240  
Old June 29th 15, 02:07 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,001
Default AG: On being overtaken

On Sun, 28 Jun 2015 11:24:13 -0400, Frank Krygowski
wrote:

Cropduster? I hope you were holding your breath!


I don't think he was actually dusting crops -- they were the wrong
kind of crops, for one thing -- but he was flying back and forth in a
cropdusterly manner. Perhaps sight-seeing, or practicing turns -- or
trying not to get too far from the airstrip before it was his turn to
land, though I don't know of any airstrips in that area.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
 




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