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AG: Aunt Granny's Advice, or How to become an elderly cyclist:



 
 
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  #1001  
Old September 20th 19, 03:45 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
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Posts: 1,411
Default Top-Not Come Down: was: AG: Eight Days of Gibson

On Mon, 16 Sep 2019 22:56:52 -0400, Joy Beeson
wrote:

I'll probably be tired on Thursday.


Ayup.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
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  #1002  
Old September 20th 19, 05:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
NFN Smith[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default AG: Special clothing for the bike

Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/18/2019 12:19 AM, Vladimir Sedach wrote:
Joy Beeson writes:

I don't want to fray the hems of my only seeing-a-lawyer jeans, and I
don't keep safety pins in the left-side pocket.


Never tried safety pins. I tight-roll the hems 1980s style, works
great.


Starting back in the 1970s, I tried tucking my cuffs into my socks. The
cuffs slipped out. Then I tried rolling the cuffs up. That took too
long, and if not done perfectly, the cuffs slipped out. I tried pants
clips made of spring steel, and reflective ones made of nylon fabric and
velcro. I tried thick rubber bands.

Most of those would work for a while, but eventually come loose enough
that my dress trousers (when I was riding to work) would end up with
some chain grease on them.

Safety pins work for me. I flip the front of the cuffs to the outside,
wrap them tightly around my ankle and pin them. They stay pinned and
never come loose.

Switching to a waxed chain helped too, but the pins are more important.



When I was in college, I had a couple of different straps that were
about 9" long and between half and full inch wide. Velcro at the ends,
and reflective tape on the outside. One was a braded strap with velcro
sewn to the outside, the other was entirely plastic, where the entire
outside was reflective. Besides keeping the pant leg out of the chain,
I found the effectiveness to be especially useful, since I was out
frequently after dark. When I was done riding, I don't remember if I
threw the strap in the pocket of my backpack (probably) or simply looped
around my locking cable.

Just for grins, I took a quick look at Amazon, and found a number of
representative samples, and probably could find several more by varying
the search terms.
https://www.amazon.com/slp/velcro-pa...e3mdmg5uccf9w7

Smith
  #1003  
Old September 20th 19, 05:20 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,802
Default AG: Special clothing for the bike

On 9/20/2019 12:00 PM, NFN Smith wrote:
Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/18/2019 12:19 AM, Vladimir Sedach wrote:
Joy Beeson writes:

I don't want to fray the hems of my only seeing-a-lawyer jeans, and I
don't keep safety pins in the left-side pocket.

Never tried safety pins. I tight-roll the hems 1980s style, works
great.


Starting back in the 1970s, I tried tucking my cuffs into my socks.
The cuffs slipped out. Then I tried rolling the cuffs up. That took
too long, and if not done perfectly, the cuffs slipped out. I tried
pants clips made of spring steel, and reflective ones made of nylon
fabric and velcro. I tried thick rubber bands.

Most of those would work for a while, but eventually come loose enough
that my dress trousers (when I was riding to work) would end up with
some chain grease on them.

Safety pins work for me. I flip the front of the cuffs to the outside,
wrap them tightly around my ankle and pin them. They stay pinned and
never come loose.

Switching to a waxed chain helped too, but the pins are more important.



When I was in college, I had a couple of different straps that were
about 9" long and between half and full inch wide.* Velcro at the ends,
and reflective tape on the outside.* One was a braded strap with velcro
sewn to the outside, the other was entirely plastic, where the entire
outside was reflective.* Besides keeping the pant leg out of the chain,
I found the effectiveness to be especially useful, since I was out
frequently after dark.* When I was done riding, I don't remember if I
threw the strap in the pocket of my backpack (probably) or simply looped
around my locking cable.

Just for grins, I took a quick look at Amazon, and found a number of
representative samples, and probably could find several more by varying
the search terms.
https://www.amazon.com/slp/velcro-pa...e3mdmg5uccf9w7


Yes, we have a few of those around the house.

Another design my wife likes is an ankle strap modeled on the "slap
bracelet" that was briefly popular with kids. It's a thin spring steel
strap about 10" long that's pre-stressed in such a way that if you
extend it all the way, it stays straight; but if you bend it at any
point, it snaps into a circular shape.

She has one leg strap made with that spring steel, covered with
reflective plastic. It snaps in place around her pant cuffs. And I don't
doubt that the reflective surface helps at night. The "biomotion" of
pedaling grabs attention.

But she doesn't do the utility mileage that I do. IME my cuffs gradually
creep out of those types of straps.


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #1004  
Old September 20th 19, 07:23 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
NFN Smith[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default AG: Special clothing for the bike

Frank Krygowski wrote:
Another design my wife likes is an ankle strap modeled on the "slap
bracelet" that was briefly popular with kids. It's a thin spring steel
strap about 10" long that's pre-stressed in such a way that if you
extend it all the way, it stays straight; but if you bend it at any
point, it snaps into a circular shape.

She has one leg strap made with that spring steel, covered with
reflective plastic. It snaps in place around her pant cuffs. And I don't
doubt that the reflective surface helps at night. The "biomotion" of
pedaling grabs attention.



When I was writing, I did think of the spring steel bracelet, but didn't
mention. I was never comfortable with that design. I never used it, and
just by appearance, it felt too constricting. I was much more content
with designs of soft plastic, or nylon strap.

Now that I think of it, I wonder what I did with my old ankle bands... I
don't remember throwing them away, but I can't imagine that I didn't.

Smith

  #1005  
Old September 21st 19, 02:48 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
pH
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default AG: Eight Days of Gibson

On Saturday, September 14, 2019 at 7:57:29 PM UTC-7, Joy Beeson wrote:
Friday 13 September 2019


It takes a while to reverse the direction of every hair on my head, so
when I noticed that I'd want to pin my hair up again on Wednesday, I
didn't take it down Sunday night.

Then an unexpected invitation to a barbecue canceled my usual Saturday
ride, so here it is Friday night and I'm still wearing my hair in a
Gibson.

From Sunday to Sunday -- eight days pinned up must be a new record!

I may go for eleven: I'm driving home from Fort Wayne on Wednesday,
on Monday I'm staying home to do the wash, and I don't want to push
myself on the day before Wednesday. I did a major shopping today, so
I probably won't need to take a short ride. (The nearest grocery is
so close that I've ridden there on my Trek Pure, and before the
sciatica, I walked it more than once.)

Perhaps I can start getting my leg strength back on Thursday.

At any rate, I haven't thunk up any bike-riding topics this week.

But if'n you want a very good recipe for pickled garlic, I could
pontificate.

--
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


Even though I was born just after dirt had been invented, I had to look up a Gibson.
Lovely.
I don't think guys realize just how rough girls have it....they have to do everything we all do AND look lovely at all times along the way. Whew!
Although I've noticed that it seems to be by far other girls ripping each other up than the guys.

As far as recipes...do you have a simple/foolproof way of making saeurkraut that you like?

To work biking in, today I went on a ten mile ride. Found some wood from recent P.G.&E. (the local power company) tree trimming and played "wood vulture" after I got back to the pickup truck. I resisted the urge to attempt picking up things that my back would later regret.

pH in Aptos.

  #1006  
Old September 21st 19, 03:01 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
pH
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 41
Default AG: Special clothing for the bike

On Wednesday, September 18, 2019 at 12:48:48 PM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 9/18/2019 12:19 AM, Vladimir Sedach wrote:
Joy Beeson writes:

I don't want to fray the hems of my only seeing-a-lawyer jeans, and I
don't keep safety pins in the left-side pocket.


Never tried safety pins. I tight-roll the hems 1980s style, works
great.


Starting back in the 1970s, I tried tucking my cuffs into my socks. The
cuffs slipped out. Then I tried rolling the cuffs up. That took too
long, and if not done perfectly, the cuffs slipped out. I tried pants
clips made of spring steel, and reflective ones made of nylon fabric and
velcro. I tried thick rubber bands.

Most of those would work for a while, but eventually come loose enough
that my dress trousers (when I was riding to work) would end up with
some chain grease on them.

Safety pins work for me. I flip the front of the cuffs to the outside,
wrap them tightly around my ankle and pin them. They stay pinned and
never come loose.

Switching to a waxed chain helped too, but the pins are more important.


--
- Frank Krygowski


When I went to college back in the day I simply started wearing shorts when I got tired of bike chain stains.
I've never looked back and have essentially worn shorts for the rest of my life (so far).

Time out for weddings and sadly, at this stage of the game, funerals.

Saw an enlclosed chaincase "Gazelle" bike which I think was Dutch. Had an electic assist bottom bracket (a big oval shell that the frame seemed purpose-made for) and a Shimano Nexus rear hub. Now chain-stain there.

pH in Aptos
  #1007  
Old September 21st 19, 04:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,802
Default AG: Eight Days of Gibson

On 9/20/2019 9:48 PM, pH wrote:

Even though I was born just after dirt had been invented, I had to look up a Gibson.
Lovely.
I don't think guys realize just how rough girls have it....they have to do everything we all do AND look lovely at all times along the way. Whew!
Although I've noticed that it seems to be by far other girls ripping each other up than the guys.


I like the comic strip _Zits_, centered on the teenaged guy Jeremy and
his friends and family.

In one of them, Jeremy's girlfriend Sarah (or is it Sara?) complains
about all the time she spends on her hair. It was something like "Hair
and shoes! Hair and shoes! We spend all that time on hair and shoes just
to appeal to men!"

And Jeremy thinks "Yet we're mostly interested in the stuff in between."


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #1008  
Old September 22nd 19, 01:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,411
Default AG: Eight Days of Gibson

On Fri, 20 Sep 2019 18:48:52 -0700 (PDT), pH wrote:

As far as recipes...do you have a simple/foolproof way of making saeurkraut that you like?


I don't think any way of making saeurkraut can be fool proof --
everything has to be sterile, yet the ferment must survive.

I was surprised to read on the Web that vegetables can be fermented in
mason jars -- Mom always used knee-high stoneware crocks for her kraut
and pickles. And most of her pickling was done before we got
electricity and running water! When she told me that it isn't
carrying water into the house that gets you down, but carrying it out,
I didn't realize that she was speaking from experience. We moved into
town shortly after I was born, and when we moved back to the farm
after the war, we'd saved up enough money to put in plumbing and buy a
tractor.

I remember pickling -- only that the brine must be strong enough to
float an egg -- and I do know what Mom's kraut cutter looked like, but
she bought kraut -- she insisted on chopped kraut; I settle for
shredded.

About the time I got old enough to be useful, Dad retired and Mom went
back to nursing, so I never took part in pickling. I did help with
canning; when I married, I was surprised that I couldn't wash a
canning jar by putting my hand inside it.

So all I retain of Mom's preserving methods is bread-and-butter
pickles, and I learned that from the cookbook she began writing for
her children.

http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/COOKBOOK/PICKLES.HTM

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

  #1009  
Old September 29th 19, 04:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,411
Default AG: Goofing off


I forgot all about writing a post this week.

It was sprinkling when I left the house this morning, and by the time
I got to the bridge, I'd decided to come straight back from the
fairgrounds market, but it cleared up before I left the first market,
and when I left the second farmers' market, it was so sunny that I
also stopped at the grocery. Probably could have stopped at the
library without getting rained on, but I didn't even glance in that
direction.

I did go to the grocery by way of Clark street, instead of putting in
the extra distance to use Arthur. The boardwalk is slippery after a
rain anyway. We had a storm in the night, and the mountain-bike
trails are closed.

I used to wait until I got to Lincoln School to zig over to Clark, but
they painted a "please right-hook me" lane on Fort Wayne, which makes
it mentally strenous to ride there, because one can't count on car
drivers to be unconfused. Also, there is less traffic on Clark, and
the pavement is brand new at least half the way.

There were two food trucks in the park, left over from this morning's
charity ride, but I had frozen bread balls in my pannier, and I wasn't
sure the trucks would still be there after I'd put away my groceries.
Pity; I've been wanting to try Tacos Jalisco for years.


--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


  #1010  
Old September 30th 19, 06:15 PM posted to rec.bicycles.misc
Joy Beeson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,411
Default AG: Goofing off


Today I'm getting the September Banner ready to mail. Every time I
come across "I saw a couple of neat tricycles at the Trail House.", I
read it as "I saw a couple of meat tricycles."

I've been having fun trying to come up with a meaning for "meat
tricycle".

--
Joy Beeson, U.S.A., mostly central Hoosier,
some Northern Indiana, Upstate New York, Florida, and Hawaii
joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
The above message is a Usenet post.
I don't recall having given anyone permission to use it on a Web site.


 




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