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  #81  
Old August 15th 19, 08:32 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,062
Default Recovery and Diet

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 9:25:06 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:
On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 11:58:23 PM UTC-4, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:34:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

A power meter is a vital accessory for the elderly bicycle enthusiast
as how else can he brag about his accomplishments - "I averaged 12 mph
for two hours last Sunday".


Write down starting time in notebook. Write down finishing time in
notebook. Go to Google Maps, ask for directions along your chosen
route. Write down distance.

Apply third-grade math.

--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/


Asking for BICYCLING directions on Google Maps can often have you riding WAY out of your way if you follow them. When I use Google Maps to calculate the distance on a planned ride I right click on the map at where I'm starting from and then add markers at various points alone the route I plan to ride. Otherwise I find that Google Maps will often deviate from the shortest route to take a route that uses a rail-trail or other off-road facility and those deviations can add many miles to a route.

Cheers


In places like New York you had damn well better follow those Rails to Trails routes if you don't want to be run over.
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  #82  
Old August 15th 19, 08:35 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,062
Default Recovery and Diet

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 9:47:15 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 08:17:38 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at 4:52:50 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


For your information, not that I need to provide, I've never smoked a
cigarette or tried smoking one in my entire life. You sir, are
completely delusional.

Cheers


Your delusions began when you started considering yourself some sort of
expert at anything. What have you done for a living since your replies
seem to indicate that it was something like ditch digging or hod
carrying.


Over here, ditch diggers, also called plumbers, generally gross more over
a lifetime than top surgeons.


Chalo is an East Indian name. Ask yourself what would happen to him if he so much as mentioned abortion in India. His parents would disclaim him.
  #83  
Old August 15th 19, 08:40 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tom Kunich[_5_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,062
Default Recovery and Diet

On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 5:51:53 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2019 1:25 AM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 04:40:54 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 21:25:03 -0700, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 11:58:23 PM UTC-4, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:34:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

A power meter is a vital accessory for the elderly bicycle enthusiast
as how else can he brag about his accomplishments - "I averaged 12
mph for two hours last Sunday".

Write down starting time in notebook. Write down finishing time in
notebook. Go to Google Maps, ask for directions along your chosen
route. Write down distance.

Apply third-grade math.

--
Joy Beeson joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Asking for BICYCLING directions on Google Maps can often have you riding
WAY out of your way if you follow them.

Gogle mpas are so car orientated. There is always a (or more)better
bicycle route.

When I use Google Maps to
calculate the distance on a planned ride I right click on the map at
where I'm starting from and then add markers at various points alone the
route I plan to ride.

Otherwise I find that Google Maps will often
deviate from the shortest route to take a route that uses a rail-trail
or other off-road facility and those deviations can add many miles to a
route.

Over here, it frequently will have you travelling 1,000 miles on sealed
roads as opposed to 10miles on a gravel road.


Whatever did people do before Google Maps? I can remember driving
across the United States twice without any maps at all.
--
cheers,

John B.


+1
Look in the atlas, fill tank and go. I've been all over this
country never having used an electronic device. YMMV.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


Remember when you could get maps at any gas station? I used to get those and plan bicycle tours all over the country. You don't get lost if you have this thing called "language" and are willing to ask people.

  #84  
Old August 15th 19, 08:52 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 500
Default Recovery and Diet

On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 2:51:53 PM UTC+2, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2019 1:25 AM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 04:40:54 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 21:25:03 -0700, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 11:58:23 PM UTC-4, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:34:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

A power meter is a vital accessory for the elderly bicycle enthusiast
as how else can he brag about his accomplishments - "I averaged 12
mph for two hours last Sunday".

Write down starting time in notebook. Write down finishing time in
notebook. Go to Google Maps, ask for directions along your chosen
route. Write down distance.

Apply third-grade math.

--
Joy Beeson joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Asking for BICYCLING directions on Google Maps can often have you riding
WAY out of your way if you follow them.

Gogle mpas are so car orientated. There is always a (or more)better
bicycle route.

When I use Google Maps to
calculate the distance on a planned ride I right click on the map at
where I'm starting from and then add markers at various points alone the
route I plan to ride.

Otherwise I find that Google Maps will often
deviate from the shortest route to take a route that uses a rail-trail
or other off-road facility and those deviations can add many miles to a
route.

Over here, it frequently will have you travelling 1,000 miles on sealed
roads as opposed to 10miles on a gravel road.


Whatever did people do before Google Maps? I can remember driving
across the United States twice without any maps at all.
--
cheers,

John B.


+1
Look in the atlas, fill tank and go. I've been all over this
country never having used an electronic device. YMMV.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


All the 'tough' guys say they don't need electronic assistance and all they need is a glance at a paper map once in a while. Sure that is possible but electronic assistance makes it a hell more convenient. First time in the US, mid 80's, I drove form NYC to LA only using a Rand Mcnally atlas; one page per state. It was possible but it took me quite a while to get out of NYC. Last time a got a Garmin with my rental and driving was much more relaxing.

Lou
  #85  
Old August 15th 19, 09:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Duane[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 378
Default Recovery and Diet

On 15/08/2019 3:52 p.m., wrote:
On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 2:51:53 PM UTC+2, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2019 1:25 AM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 04:40:54 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 21:25:03 -0700, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 11:58:23 PM UTC-4, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:34:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

A power meter is a vital accessory for the elderly bicycle enthusiast
as how else can he brag about his accomplishments - "I averaged 12
mph for two hours last Sunday".

Write down starting time in notebook. Write down finishing time in
notebook. Go to Google Maps, ask for directions along your chosen
route. Write down distance.

Apply third-grade math.

--
Joy Beeson joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Asking for BICYCLING directions on Google Maps can often have you riding
WAY out of your way if you follow them.

Gogle mpas are so car orientated. There is always a (or more)better
bicycle route.

When I use Google Maps to
calculate the distance on a planned ride I right click on the map at
where I'm starting from and then add markers at various points alone the
route I plan to ride.

Otherwise I find that Google Maps will often
deviate from the shortest route to take a route that uses a rail-trail
or other off-road facility and those deviations can add many miles to a
route.

Over here, it frequently will have you travelling 1,000 miles on sealed
roads as opposed to 10miles on a gravel road.

Whatever did people do before Google Maps? I can remember driving
across the United States twice without any maps at all.
--
cheers,

John B.


+1
Look in the atlas, fill tank and go. I've been all over this
country never having used an electronic device. YMMV.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


All the 'tough' guys say they don't need electronic assistance and all they need is a glance at a paper map once in a while. Sure that is possible but electronic assistance makes it a hell more convenient. First time in the US, mid 80's, I drove form NYC to LA only using a Rand Mcnally atlas; one page per state. It was possible but it took me quite a while to get out of NYC. Last time a got a Garmin with my rental and driving was much more relaxing.

Lou


I've driven from Montreal home to New Orleans a couple of times. With
my Garmin, it took me to my sister's front door in spite of
construction, road closures, detours due to winter storms and whatever.
I'm sure I could have found my way but what's the point of struggling
with outdated maps that don't have a clue about current conditions?

Here in Montreal I use the Waze app because I never know where the
construction will be closing access to roads. Garmin doesn't even pick
up on this stuff.

To bring this back to cycling, trying to decipher an out of date map
while riding a bike is not only annoying, it's illegal here.

YMM also V g

  #86  
Old August 15th 19, 09:24 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 10,882
Default Recovery and Diet

On 8/15/2019 2:40 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 5:51:53 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2019 1:25 AM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 04:40:54 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 21:25:03 -0700, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 11:58:23 PM UTC-4, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:34:51 +0700, John B.
wrote:

A power meter is a vital accessory for the elderly bicycle enthusiast
as how else can he brag about his accomplishments - "I averaged 12
mph for two hours last Sunday".

Write down starting time in notebook. Write down finishing time in
notebook. Go to Google Maps, ask for directions along your chosen
route. Write down distance.

Apply third-grade math.

--
Joy Beeson joy beeson at comcast dot net http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Asking for BICYCLING directions on Google Maps can often have you riding
WAY out of your way if you follow them.

Gogle mpas are so car orientated. There is always a (or more)better
bicycle route.

When I use Google Maps to
calculate the distance on a planned ride I right click on the map at
where I'm starting from and then add markers at various points alone the
route I plan to ride.

Otherwise I find that Google Maps will often
deviate from the shortest route to take a route that uses a rail-trail
or other off-road facility and those deviations can add many miles to a
route.

Over here, it frequently will have you travelling 1,000 miles on sealed
roads as opposed to 10miles on a gravel road.

Whatever did people do before Google Maps? I can remember driving
across the United States twice without any maps at all.
--
cheers,

John B.


+1
Look in the atlas, fill tank and go. I've been all over this
country never having used an electronic device. YMMV.


Remember when you could get maps at any gas station? I used to get those and plan bicycle tours all over the country. You don't get lost if you have this thing called "language" and are willing to ask people.


Tried that recently? Almost nobody knows where they are,
anything about the neighborhood or especially how to go from
here to there.

I was in Omaha recently and a block away from my
destination. Residents gave me the 1000 yard stare until I
just happened to discover that 38th Street is parallel and
next to 38th Avenue.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #87  
Old August 15th 19, 09:50 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,806
Default Recovery and Diet

On 8/15/2019 4:24 PM, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2019 2:40 PM, Tom Kunich wrote:
On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 5:51:53 AM UTC-7, AMuzi wrote:
On 8/15/2019 1:25 AM, John B. wrote:
On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 04:40:54 -0000 (UTC), news18
wrote:

On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 21:25:03 -0700, Sir Ridesalot wrote:

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 11:58:23 PM UTC-4, Joy Beeson wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 05:34:51 +0700, John B.

wrote:

A power meter is a vital accessory for the elderly bicycle
enthusiast
as how else can he brag about his accomplishments - "I averaged 12
mph for two hours last Sunday".

Write down starting time in notebook.* Write down finishing time in
notebook.* Go to Google Maps, ask for directions along your chosen
route.* Write down distance.

Apply third-grade math.

--
Joy Beeson joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/

Asking for BICYCLING directions on Google Maps can often have you
riding
WAY out of your way if you follow them.

Gogle mpas are so car orientated. There is always a (or more)better
bicycle route.

When I use Google Maps to
calculate the distance on a planned ride I right click on the map at
where I'm starting from and then add markers at various points
alone the
route I plan to ride.

Otherwise I find that Google Maps will often
deviate from the shortest route to take a route that uses a
rail-trail
or other off-road facility and those deviations can add many miles
to a
route.

Over here, it frequently will have you travelling 1,000 miles on
sealed
roads as opposed to 10miles on a gravel road.

Whatever did people do before Google Maps? I can remember driving
across the United States twice without any maps at all.
--
cheers,

John B.


+1
Look in the atlas, fill tank and go. I've been all over this
country never having used an electronic device. YMMV.


Remember when you could get maps at any gas station? I used to get
those and plan bicycle tours all over the country. You don't get lost
if you have this thing called "language" and are willing to ask people.


Tried that recently? Almost nobody knows where they are, anything about
the neighborhood or especially how to go from here to there.


Way back in 1976, on our first overseas bike trip (to Great Britain) I
remember stopping to ask directions many times. A lady on crutches not
only gave us directions, but hobbled along for half a block so she could
point out the proper intersection to us.

Also, the habit over there seemed to be: Give full detailed directions;
then at the end, give a quick summary, as in "So that's left, then right
at the second intersection, then take the next left. Have you got that?"
Very, very helpful!


--
- Frank Krygowski
  #88  
Old August 15th 19, 10:03 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Frank Krygowski[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 7,806
Default Recovery and Diet

On 8/15/2019 3:52 PM, wrote:

All the 'tough' guys say they don't need electronic assistance and all they need is a glance at a paper map once in a while. Sure that is possible but electronic assistance makes it a hell more convenient. First time in the US, mid 80's, I drove form NYC to LA only using a Rand Mcnally atlas; one page per state. It was possible but it took me quite a while to get out of NYC. Last time a got a Garmin with my rental and driving was much more relaxing.


It's certainly more relaxing, especially in a city situation. But I like
checking maps in less stressful situations because they give me context
and a sense of where I actually am. I can spot the towns along the way,
better plan my rest stops, and sometimes find attractions along the way.

One example: My wife was driving, towing our camping trailer, as we
headed north in Michigan toward the Upper Peninsula. I had the map and
was searching for state parks where we might camp. Only on examining the
map did I realize that it would make sense to visit Mackinac Island -
that it was near enough to where we'd be stopping for the night. We were
able to get a last-minute hotel room for two nights, take the ferry to
the island, and had a fine time walking and cycling there before heading
further north.

The GPS never tells me "What's that lake over there? Or that mountain in
the distance? Is there a nice country road parallel to this freeway?"
etc. So I think it's best to have both.

--
- Frank Krygowski
  #89  
Old August 15th 19, 10:33 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Sir Ridesalot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 4,624
Default Recovery and Diet

On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 5:03:05 PM UTC-4, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 8/15/2019 3:52 PM, wrote:

All the 'tough' guys say they don't need electronic assistance and all they need is a glance at a paper map once in a while. Sure that is possible but electronic assistance makes it a hell more convenient. First time in the US, mid 80's, I drove form NYC to LA only using a Rand Mcnally atlas; one page per state. It was possible but it took me quite a while to get out of NYC. Last time a got a Garmin with my rental and driving was much more relaxing.


It's certainly more relaxing, especially in a city situation. But I like
checking maps in less stressful situations because they give me context
and a sense of where I actually am. I can spot the towns along the way,
better plan my rest stops, and sometimes find attractions along the way.

One example: My wife was driving, towing our camping trailer, as we
headed north in Michigan toward the Upper Peninsula. I had the map and
was searching for state parks where we might camp. Only on examining the
map did I realize that it would make sense to visit Mackinac Island -
that it was near enough to where we'd be stopping for the night. We were
able to get a last-minute hotel room for two nights, take the ferry to
the island, and had a fine time walking and cycling there before heading
further north.

The GPS never tells me "What's that lake over there? Or that mountain in
the distance? Is there a nice country road parallel to this freeway?"
etc. So I think it's best to have both.

--
- Frank Krygowski


When I plan a bicycle ride and use Google Maps to do that I can switch to satellite view, zoom in and then get a street view of the road. I can then follow that street view and see exactly what's along my planned route. Not only that there is a side bar on Google Maps that has icons for all sorts of things that I might be interested in such as restaurants, coffee, bed & breakfasts, hotels, banks, groceries, hospitals and so on. Plus it even tells me the traffic volume I can expect in the area. Another feature that's great about these electronic mapping programs is that they're often a lot more up to date than a paper map is plus if they route has been uploaded to a smart phone or is on a device that fits on your bike, the information is right at your fingertips and is easily accessible even if it's raining and/or very windy. You might not like these electronic maps but many find them much more convenient and useful than a paper map. YMMV and most likely does.

Cheers
  #90  
Old August 16th 19, 12:20 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
jOHN b.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,187
Default Recovery and Diet

On Thu, 15 Aug 2019 12:35:34 -0700 (PDT), Tom Kunich
wrote:

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019 at 9:47:15 PM UTC-7, news18 wrote:
On Wed, 14 Aug 2019 08:17:38 -0700, Tom Kunich wrote:

On Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at 4:52:50 PM UTC-7, Sir Ridesalot wrote:


For your information, not that I need to provide, I've never smoked a
cigarette or tried smoking one in my entire life. You sir, are
completely delusional.

Cheers

Your delusions began when you started considering yourself some sort of
expert at anything. What have you done for a living since your replies
seem to indicate that it was something like ditch digging or hod
carrying.


Over here, ditch diggers, also called plumbers, generally gross more over
a lifetime than top surgeons.


Chalo is an East Indian name. Ask yourself what would happen to him if he so much as mentioned abortion in India. His parents would disclaim him.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aborti...ode ,_1860%29
Abortion incidence in India

It is estimated that 15.6 million abortions take place in India every
year. A significant proportion of these are expected to be unsafe.
Unsafe abortion is the third largest cause of maternal mortality
leading to death of 10 women each day and thousands more facing
morbidities. There is a need to strengthen women's access to CAC
services and preventing deaths and disabilities faced by them.

The last large-scale study on induced abortion in India was conducted
in 2002 as part of the Abortion Assessment Project. The studies as
part of this project estimated 6.4 million[11] abortions annually in
India.
--
cheers,

John B.

 




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