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Finally shifted the seized seat post.



 
 
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  #11  
Old October 11th 17, 08:31 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
dave[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.

On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 15:08:12 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 10/9/2017 1:37 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 at 12:56:21 PM UTC-7, Ian Field wrote:
had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery powder
on the seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.


Nice! But copper?


For a seat post, molybdenum base or copper base paste are fine.
The high temp aspect of copper is irrelevant but if that's the can he
has then that's the can he should use.


I understand the reason for lubing a seat post to be preventing
dissimilar metals such as aluminium post and steel frame tubes from
coming into contact and galling together. Does galvanic corrosion of the
aluminium with the copper element not cause problems?

--
davethedave
Ads
  #12  
Old October 11th 17, 10:21 AM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
John B.[_3_]
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Posts: 3,666
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.

On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 07:31:06 -0000 (UTC), dave
wrote:

On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 15:08:12 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 10/9/2017 1:37 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 at 12:56:21 PM UTC-7, Ian Field wrote:
had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery powder
on the seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice! But copper?


For a seat post, molybdenum base or copper base paste are fine.
The high temp aspect of copper is irrelevant but if that's the can he
has then that's the can he should use.


I understand the reason for lubing a seat post to be preventing
dissimilar metals such as aluminium post and steel frame tubes from
coming into contact and galling together. Does galvanic corrosion of the
aluminium with the copper element not cause problems?


It might. On the other hand most anti-seize mixes contain oil or
grease that probably insulate the copper particles from the aluminum
post or prevent the access of an electrolyte (water).
--
Cheers,

John B.

  #13  
Old October 11th 17, 02:47 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.

On Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 12:31:09 AM UTC-7, davethedave wrote:
On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 15:08:12 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 10/9/2017 1:37 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 at 12:56:21 PM UTC-7, Ian Field wrote:
had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery powder
on the seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice! But copper?


For a seat post, molybdenum base or copper base paste are fine.
The high temp aspect of copper is irrelevant but if that's the can he
has then that's the can he should use.


I understand the reason for lubing a seat post to be preventing
dissimilar metals such as aluminium post and steel frame tubes from
coming into contact and galling together. Does galvanic corrosion of the
aluminium with the copper element not cause problems?


By the best mechanic I ever new I was taught that you NEVER put lube on a seat post because it would cause it to slip at the tightest you could get it.. Having tried it I found him as usual to be completely correct. So I prevent problems by removing the aluminum post on the yearly service and making sure that everything is clean.
  #14  
Old October 11th 17, 03:42 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,080
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.

On 10/11/2017 2:31 AM, dave wrote:
On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 15:08:12 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 10/9/2017 1:37 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 at 12:56:21 PM UTC-7, Ian Field wrote:
had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery powder
on the seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice! But copper?


For a seat post, molybdenum base or copper base paste are fine.
The high temp aspect of copper is irrelevant but if that's the can he
has then that's the can he should use.


I understand the reason for lubing a seat post to be preventing
dissimilar metals such as aluminium post and steel frame tubes from
coming into contact and galling together. Does galvanic corrosion of the
aluminium with the copper element not cause problems?


I can't speak to the chemistry of it but in practice both
molybdenum and copper based antiseize pastes work well for
seatposts and similar bicycle applications. For auto
exhaust systems, I use copper.

http://www.antiseize.com/Anti-Seize-Compounds

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #15  
Old October 11th 17, 05:21 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Tosspot[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,101
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.

On 10/10/17 22:56, Ian Field wrote:


"Doug Landau" wrote in message
...

had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery
powder on
the
seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and
twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice!** But copper?

Copper based anti-seize paste is what they have on the shelves round
here. I
have a tub of something based on a silvery colour metal, but I
generally buy
more Copperslip when it gets used up.

molybdenum is a "friction modifier" - I had to do the clamp bolt up
seriously tight with just the copper stuff on it.


This reply does not address the validity - or lack thereof - of the
alleged theory of operation of anti-sieze compounds, which says that
the metal used therein should match the metal which is having a
corrosion problem, so as to be taken up by the reaction and thus spare
or partially spare the coated part.


Translation please...................


Yer grease goes manky not yer seat post.

  #16  
Old October 11th 17, 07:53 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 220
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.



"dave" wrote in message
news
On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 15:08:12 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 10/9/2017 1:37 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 at 12:56:21 PM UTC-7, Ian Field wrote:
had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery powder
on the seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice! But copper?


For a seat post, molybdenum base or copper base paste are fine.
The high temp aspect of copper is irrelevant but if that's the can he
has then that's the can he should use.


I understand the reason for lubing a seat post to be preventing
dissimilar metals such as aluminium post and steel frame tubes from
coming into contact and galling together. Does galvanic corrosion of the
aluminium with the copper element not cause problems?


No idea - i haven't got an aluminium seat post.

  #17  
Old October 11th 17, 08:00 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 220
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.



"AMuzi" wrote in message
news
On 10/11/2017 2:31 AM, dave wrote:
On Mon, 09 Oct 2017 15:08:12 -0500, AMuzi wrote:

On 10/9/2017 1:37 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Sunday, October 8, 2017 at 12:56:21 PM UTC-7, Ian Field wrote:
had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery powder
on the seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice! But copper?


For a seat post, molybdenum base or copper base paste are fine.
The high temp aspect of copper is irrelevant but if that's the can he
has then that's the can he should use.


I understand the reason for lubing a seat post to be preventing
dissimilar metals such as aluminium post and steel frame tubes from
coming into contact and galling together. Does galvanic corrosion of the
aluminium with the copper element not cause problems?


I can't speak to the chemistry of it but in practice both molybdenum and
copper based antiseize pastes work well for seatposts and similar bicycle
applications. For auto exhaust systems, I use copper.


my first tin of coppaslip after not having any for a while, was for fitting
a new motorcycle exhaust system - but it works very well for all sorts of
things on a bicycle.

Generally speaking; any corroded part that gives me trouble dismantling it -
gets Coppaslip in the way back.

The local bicycle shop *ADVISED* me to Coppaslip the threads on the type of
sprocket cassette that unscrews as a unit.

  #18  
Old October 11th 17, 08:05 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Ian Field
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 220
Default Finally shifted the seized seat post.



"Tosspot" wrote in message
...
On 10/10/17 22:56, Ian Field wrote:


"Doug Landau" wrote in message
...

had to replace the saddle, so I put a few dabs of flour-emery
powder on
the
seat clamp. There was enough grip that I could get hold of the
saddle and
twist the post out.

Now re assembled with copper slip anti seize compound.

Nice! But copper?

Copper based anti-seize paste is what they have on the shelves round
here. I
have a tub of something based on a silvery colour metal, but I
generally buy
more Copperslip when it gets used up.

molybdenum is a "friction modifier" - I had to do the clamp bolt up
seriously tight with just the copper stuff on it.

This reply does not address the validity - or lack thereof - of the
alleged theory of operation of anti-sieze compounds, which says that the
metal used therein should match the metal which is having a corrosion
problem, so as to be taken up by the reaction and thus spare or
partially spare the coated part.


Translation please...................


Yer grease goes manky not yer seat post.


Hardened old grease wouldn't been as difficult as the corrosion on the frame
I rescued from a hedge.

Marine grade prop shaft grease would beat the weather - but Coppaslip is
easier to get this far from a coast.

 




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