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  #241  
Old October 12th 17, 08:07 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
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Posts: 9,080
Default Road Discs

On 10/12/2017 1:49 PM, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/12/2017 10:24 AM, wrote:
On Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 10:52:20 AM UTC-7, Frank
Krygowski wrote:


Solid axles are almost universal on all trains. I don't
know of an
exception, although I expect someone will soon post one.


BART is a rapid transit system and they should not have
been using 19th century technology.


Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?


A completely unskilled industry-jargon-free search turned up
nothing except engineering and metallurgy improvements to
traditional solid axles, trucks, wheels, bearings and tires.
Don't know, but if they exist it's a secret.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


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  #244  
Old October 13th 17, 07:55 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
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Posts: 3,346
Default Road Discs

On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 9:19:06 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/13/2017 11:07 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 11:49:38 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/12/2017 10:24 AM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 10:52:20 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:


Solid axles are almost universal on all trains. I don't know of an
exception, although I expect someone will soon post one.

BART is a rapid transit system and they should not have been using 19th century technology.

Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?


As a mechanical engineer you're telling me you can't answer that? All of the rapid transit systems in the world have cars built in I think three assembly lines. They are all identical.


I notice you didn't answer the question.


You are growing curiouser and curiouser.

Frank: "Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?"

Tom: "They are all identical"

Frank: "I notice you didn't answer the question."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transp...zaLine1379.jpg

New York Subway system and all the rest are generally built by a German firm - Bombadier I think.

Why is it you do not know anything yourself and expect others to feed you information you could discover for yourself if you entire idea was to learn rather than bitch like a little whinny dog?
  #245  
Old October 13th 17, 08:01 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
Doug Landau
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Posts: 1,338
Default Road Discs

On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 11:55:19 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 9:19:06 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/13/2017 11:07 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 11:49:38 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/12/2017 10:24 AM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 10:52:20 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:


Solid axles are almost universal on all trains. I don't know of an
exception, although I expect someone will soon post one.

BART is a rapid transit system and they should not have been using 19th century technology.

Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?

As a mechanical engineer you're telling me you can't answer that? All of the rapid transit systems in the world have cars built in I think three assembly lines. They are all identical.


I notice you didn't answer the question.


You are growing curiouser and curiouser.

Frank: "Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?"

Tom: "They are all identical"

Frank: "I notice you didn't answer the question."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transp...zaLine1379.jpg

New York Subway system and all the rest are generally built by a German firm - Bombadier I think.

Why is it you do not know anything yourself and expect others to feed you information you could discover for yourself if you entire idea was to learn rather than bitch like a little whinny dog?


Bombardier is Canadian not German.
  #246  
Old October 13th 17, 09:10 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
AMuzi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,080
Default Road Discs

On 10/13/2017 2:01 PM, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 11:55:19 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 9:19:06 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/13/2017 11:07 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 11:49:38 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/12/2017 10:24 AM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 10:52:20 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:


Solid axles are almost universal on all trains. I don't know of an
exception, although I expect someone will soon post one.

BART is a rapid transit system and they should not have been using 19th century technology.

Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?

As a mechanical engineer you're telling me you can't answer that? All of the rapid transit systems in the world have cars built in I think three assembly lines. They are all identical.

I notice you didn't answer the question.


You are growing curiouser and curiouser.

Frank: "Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?"

Tom: "They are all identical"

Frank: "I notice you didn't answer the question."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transp...zaLine1379.jpg

New York Subway system and all the rest are generally built by a German firm - Bombadier I think.

Why is it you do not know anything yourself and expect others to feed you information you could discover for yourself if you entire idea was to learn rather than bitch like a little whinny dog?


Bombardier is Canadian not German.


In yesterday's paper Kobe Steel says they supplied aluminum
sheet off-spec (fudged metallurgical inspection reports) to
Toyota, Boeing (! yikes!) and Bombardier.

--
Andrew Muzi
www.yellowjersey.org/
Open every day since 1 April, 1971


  #247  
Old October 13th 17, 11:04 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Road Discs

On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 12:01:11 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:
On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 11:55:19 AM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 9:19:06 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/13/2017 11:07 AM, wrote:
On Thursday, October 12, 2017 at 11:49:38 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:
On 10/12/2017 10:24 AM,
wrote:
On Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 10:52:20 AM UTC-7, Frank Krygowski wrote:


Solid axles are almost universal on all trains. I don't know of an
exception, although I expect someone will soon post one.

BART is a rapid transit system and they should not have been using 19th century technology.

Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?

As a mechanical engineer you're telling me you can't answer that? All of the rapid transit systems in the world have cars built in I think three assembly lines. They are all identical.

I notice you didn't answer the question.


You are growing curiouser and curiouser.

Frank: "Do you know what technology other cities' transit trains use?"

Tom: "They are all identical"

Frank: "I notice you didn't answer the question."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transp...zaLine1379.jpg

New York Subway system and all the rest are generally built by a German firm - Bombadier I think.

Why is it you do not know anything yourself and expect others to feed you information you could discover for yourself if you entire idea was to learn rather than bitch like a little whinny dog?


Bombardier is Canadian not German.


Doug - I know that but the Rapid Transit car division is in Germany if memory is correct. In any case - BART has gone through 4 upgrades now and they ALL have the same problems as steam engines - solid axles.

Because trains run so seldom it requires half a century for the rails to wear enough to require replacing. Rapid transit systems have trains running mere minutes apart.

I tried to convince they when I worked for BART but they know what they're doing. Derailing vehicles.
  #248  
Old October 13th 17, 11:11 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Road Discs

On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 3:04:56 PM UTC-7, wrote:
On Friday, October 13, 2017 at 12:01:11 PM UTC-7, Doug Landau wrote:

Bombardier is Canadian not German.


Doug - I know that but the Rapid Transit car division is in Germany if memory is correct. In any case - BART has gone through 4 upgrades now and they ALL have the same problems as steam engines - solid axles.

Because trains run so seldom it requires half a century for the rails to wear enough to require replacing. Rapid transit systems have trains running mere minutes apart.

I tried to convince they when I worked for BART but they know what they're doing. Derailing vehicles.


I should add that I tried to convince them to use separate wheel bearings and motorize them all. This would allow for making auto-slip corrections and would stop the problem if a motor failure killing a line. And of course the wheel drag around corners would cease.

They have turns going into and in the middle of the trans-bay tube. The system has to be closed a couple of times a year for rail replacement.
  #249  
Old October 14th 17, 05:16 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
David Scheidt
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,188
Default Road Discs

AMuzi wrote:

:Tom, I tried too and found... nothing for independent
:railcar wheel systems. They seem to be all solid-axle. Did I
:miss something new?

A spanish company called Talgo make passenger cars with indpendent
wheels. Amtrak has a few sets, I believe, and they're reasonably
popular in parts of Europe. But they're not the most common train
anywhere/


--
sig 48
  #250  
Old October 14th 17, 08:34 PM posted to rec.bicycles.tech
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,346
Default Road Discs

On Saturday, October 14, 2017 at 9:16:30 AM UTC-7, David Scheidt wrote:
AMuzi wrote:

:Tom, I tried too and found... nothing for independent
:railcar wheel systems. They seem to be all solid-axle. Did I
:miss something new?

A spanish company called Talgo make passenger cars with indpendent
wheels. Amtrak has a few sets, I believe, and they're reasonably
popular in parts of Europe. But they're not the most common train
anywhere/


Passenger cars that don't have their own electric drives are much easier to give independent suspension.
 




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